How come some people get jobs so easily and even good jobs?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Alden Blankenship



How come some people get jobs so easily and even good jobs?

The first thing is that you are probably an honest person.

2020 is the devil's world, honesty and good character will leave you unemployed like me in the middle of a pandemic.

The bottom line is that people are not just exaggerating, but outright lying on their resume and inflating their previous experience. If you don't do this, you may never get a job because there will always be a charming demon who can lie with his teeth and who will swear that he has been doing 97% of the work and that he will match the exact skills and the company will. go after him.

Today, companies in the United States do not give references or even return to

Keep reading

The first thing is that you are probably an honest person.

2020 is the devil's world, honesty and good character will leave you unemployed like me in the middle of a pandemic.

The bottom line is that people are not just exaggerating, but outright lying on their resume and inflating their previous experience. If you don't do this, you may never get a job because there will always be a charming demon who can lie with his teeth and who will swear that he has been doing 97% of the work and that he will match the exact skills and the company will. go after him.

Today, companies in the United States do not give references or even disclose job duties due to lawsuits. They only reveal how long you worked there. So you could literally make up whatever you want as long as the job title justifies it. So if you managed a single intern over the summer for 3 months, now this becomes "Led a team of data scientists and spearheaded the data science revolution for the enterprise." This is really what 90% of people do.

The bottom line is that there is no longer a place for good honest people on this earth. If you don't change the devil's way and lie and cheat during the interview and hiring process, someone else will. If you are 100% absolutely truthful on your resume and in your job interview, I guarantee that you will never get a job.

God may not help you! It has not helped me. I am 46 years old, I have been out of work for 9 months due to Corona. I have a family and I have no income, I don't have health insurance in the middle of a pandemic. I have applied for about 300-400 jobs and have had about 8 interviews and they have usually vanished. I get the usual, we had several prominent candidates and we had to go with someone else. Actually, the problem is that nobody wants to hire unemployed older workers because they prefer the cunning devil mentioned above. I even tried jobs that are much lower than my current experience level, but still no luck because then you are competing with new graduates for jobs as a data scientist and senior data scientist.

So if you want to get a job, do the following:

Bears the mark of the beast

Start lying on your resume

Be good at bragging and lying in phone interviews and face-to-face interviews,

When you can look at a man and lie to his face like most people do today, you have truly mastered the devil's gift of cheating, cheating, and lying.

If you don't go the devil's way, they just won't hire you today and you'll have to retire early like me ... at 46 ... hahaha.

Try not to stop applying for work while you wait to hear from an employer - the most likely result is that you will get many layoffs before you get a job. Instead of fading, take advantage of your mistakes and keep applying until you get the right offer. Waiting to hear the results of your application or meetings will simply extend the length of time your job search takes. The most terrible result that you can imagine, will be shuffling several job offers. That's something to be thankful for.

we provide the best work-https: //turboudalenka.ru/

Make a specific cover letter to help

Keep reading

Try not to stop applying for work while you wait to hear from an employer - the most likely result is that you will get many layoffs before you get a job. Instead of fading, take advantage of your mistakes and keep applying until you get the right offer. Waiting to hear the results of your application or meetings will simply extend the length of time your job search takes. The most terrible result that you can imagine, will be shuffling several job offers. That's something to be thankful for.

we provide the best work-https: //turboudalenka.ru/

Make a specific cover letter to help your resume stand out - you only have a couple of moments to dazzle a hiring manager enough to pick you up for a meeting. Employing managers must perceive how you can help the organization by writing in the main passage of your cover letter. Here's how to coordinate your skills for a job and tips on how to write a cover letter.

Also focus on your resume for work - it's not just your cover letter. Your resume needs to be tweaked and changed, making it as close to work as you could really hope for. Otherwise, it may not be obtained by the candidate global positioning frameworks that organizations use to review resumes or the enrollment specialist who reviews them.

You don't have to include all of your experience on your resume - some job seekers put many years of job information on their resumes. Sadly, that won't dazzle anyone. It dates you, it is an excessive amount of data and could involve a lot of participation in most of the vacancies.

Remember more than a full-time job for your resume - if you've been unemployed, you don't need to make your resume look like you haven't done anything since you got laid off. There are different things besides your work history that you can use to reinforce your resume.

Dress like a manager or a person who is successful in your profession: Perhaps appearances shouldn't make that much of a difference, yet they do. A couple of initial moments in a meeting are the point where you will establish that first basic connection. Make sure you dress appropriately for the type of job and friends you are applying to. Here you have meeting clothes suitable for a wide range of jobs and workplaces.

Act naturally in the interview: rehearsed answers, fake smiles, and saying what you think the interlocutor needs to hear rather than what you really agree to mislead the business. Companies need to realize who they are employing, and that is the person they expect to show up to on the first day of work. Get tips on how to show your character during a business meeting.

Narrating during a job interview is a great way to share your experience and skills - one approach to showing the company what it's really like is telling a story. By the time you have raised questions during a job chat, please convey the particular skills and experience you have, as you dealt with the circumstances about which you received information. The more solid data you provide, the more the recruiting manager will realize how qualified you are.

Don't say anything bad about a previous employer - One of the most recognized meeting failures is insulting your boss or collaborators. The main thing the interlocutor will think about is what you will say about your organization as you move forward.

Continually send a thank you note after a job interview - Follow-up after a job meeting is critical. It is a method of showing your appreciation for being considerate for the job. It is also a way to repeat your advantage and offer anything that you did not consider during the meeting.

Put aside the effort to network - it's a critical part of an effective job search. Most jobs are found through systems administration, regardless of whether it is on the web or face-to-face. No one can know who can help you find your next position, except if you tell your associations that you are looking for work.

References can make a big difference when it comes to being hired: References are important and companies check them. Get proposals from managers, associates, clients, subordinates and suppliers. Save them to destinations like LinkedIn and offer them anywhere imaginable. In case you're stressed out about getting a shoddy referral from your boss, work on getting some close referrals that you can add to your accreditations.

The key is to have a great resume. My resume is packed with skills and qualifications that I have acquired in other jobs. That's really all that an employer cares about. Also, you want to make sure your writing is top-notch. If your resume sounds smart, it will impress an employer. Show that you could have the brain for the job.

Also, be professional but accessible during any email correspondence you may have while setting up the interview. If you are lucky enough to land an interview, look your best. That doesn't always mean wearing a suit. If the work is a little more informal,

Keep reading

The key is to have a great resume. My resume is packed with skills and qualifications that I have acquired in other jobs. That's really all that an employer cares about. Also, you want to make sure your writing is top-notch. If your resume sounds smart, it will impress an employer. Show that you could have the brain for the job.

Also, be professional but accessible during any email correspondence you may have while setting up the interview. If you are lucky enough to land an interview, look your best. That doesn't always mean wearing a suit. If the work is a bit more casual, a good button-down shirt and a pair of dress pants may be appropriate. Make sure your hair is neatly combed. Most men cut their hair before an interview. Also, if you have facial hair, make sure it is neatly combed or just remove it completely.

Then during the interview, try to appear relaxed but not too relaxed. You want to give an air of confidence but also show that you take the interview seriously because the job is important to you. Prepare for the interview by thinking about common interview questions and the answers you would give, particularly for personality questions. Questions like "why would you fit in well", "what are the three weaknesses", etc. When or if they ask you these questions, act like you need a minute to think so your answers don't come off as rehearsed. It's okay to be a little nervous, interviewers expect that, but don't get so nervous that you seem weird.

Well, I can't talk about all situations, but in my experience, those who are successful in finding and landing good jobs:

  1. Prepare for the interview by researching the organization and work environment to determine if it matches your skills, knowledge, and abilities.
  2. Practice interviewing skills and answer questions with other trusted people before any interview.
  3. Demonstrate confidence and competence by submitting your rating and handling questions.
  4. Communicate well by listening, asking thoughtful questions, and giving clear answers that demonstrate your commitment.
  5. Follow with maturity and p
Keep reading

Well, I can't talk about all situations, but in my experience, those who are successful in finding and landing good jobs:

  1. Prepare for the interview by researching the organization and work environment to determine if it matches your skills, knowledge, and abilities.
  2. Practice interviewing skills and answer questions with other trusted people before any interview.
  3. Demonstrate confidence and competence by submitting your rating and handling questions.
  4. Communicate well by listening, asking thoughtful questions, and giving clear answers that demonstrate your commitment.
  5. Follow up with maturity and professionalism after each interview by thanking the interviewer and asking good follow-up questions (NOT about pay or benefits).
  6. Show your seriousness in providing value to your potential employers in all interactions.

If the candidate has done all of these things, his success will seem easy to the viewer, but "easy" is not what is happening. Finding and landing a good job is hard work, most of which occurs before the job interview, not after.

John

It is a combination of luck, skill, and a good resume.

In most cases, you have a chance to impress the potential employer; And that happens with your resume or with a reference. As such, building your resume to show what you can and cannot do is essential, because that will give the employer the right information in an instant, to decide whether or not you are a good fit for that position, and often, it can turn the clock on. idea for another post.

Then you can have the best resume written, but if you don't present it to companies then it is as good as no resume. Promoting yourself is another important skill for

Keep reading

It is a combination of luck, skill, and a good resume.

In most cases, you have a chance to impress the potential employer; And that happens with your resume or with a reference. As such, building your resume to show what you can and cannot do is essential, because that will give the employer the right information in an instant, to decide whether or not you are a good fit for that position, and often, it can turn the clock on. idea for another post.

Then you can have the best resume written, but if you don't present it to companies then it is as good as no resume. Marketing yourself is another important skill you must have these days.

Last but not least: luck. that is not under your control; You may end up in the right place where you are noticed and hired, or you will end up in the wrong place where you have a lot of competition and you won't even get noticed. That's why sometimes you apply for 200 jobs and get none, and other times you apply for 2 and get both.

I've always had a hard time getting a job. incredibly hard. He gave up countless interviews. This is what I think about it.

  1. You are selling yourself to the person on the other side of the table, so you must show that you are adding value. Do your best to find out what they are looking for too.
  2. In order to sell, you need to know what value it brings and be confident (don't be cocky) about it. Your experiences are rich and unique. They will be useful.
  3. Sometimes it's not you, there are dozens of external factors that could derail your chances, which are not even related to you.
    eg someone internally
Keep reading

I've always had a hard time getting a job. incredibly hard. He gave up countless interviews. This is what I think about it.

  1. You are selling yourself to the person on the other side of the table, so you must show that you are adding value. Do your best to find out what they are looking for too.
  2. In order to sell, you need to know what value it brings and be confident (don't be cocky) about it. Your experiences are rich and unique. They will be useful.
  3. Sometimes it's not you, there are dozens of external factors that could derail your chances, which are not even related to you.
    For example, someone internally fits the job better, has no budget, the interviewer had a bad day and was not paying attention. The company must first hire elsewhere. etc ...

Strengthen the numbers 1 and 2, and pray that there is less than the number 3. hahahaha

all the best.

Easy. It is who you know; not what you know. If you don't have someone to help you cross the bridge and enter a company / school, you have to try many times more. It is not fair to those who have truly earned their position.

Gandhi, my take is that it is primarily KnowledgeSkillsAbilityExperience (KSAE) for a person to fit into a well designed position that has been advertised. Other than that, some have connections within an entity where they will be employed.

Carver wrightman

aka Cecil R. Williams

I'm writing a personal answer, so take it for what it's worth. I am 51 years old with a wealth of education, certifications, and positions that in the past have helped me develop to take on ever-increasing senior leadership roles, responsibilities, and positions. A company I was working for merged with another cable company and my job was eliminated. To say that I have struggled has been an understatement. First, I applied for what I considered similar jobs. Then I said to myself, okay, apply for the next level. Then I started taking more free classes online and

Keep reading

I'm writing a personal answer, so take it for what it's worth. I am 51 years old with a wealth of education, certifications, and positions that in the past have helped me develop to take on ever-increasing senior leadership roles, responsibilities, and positions. A company I was working for merged with another cable company and my job was eliminated. To say that I have struggled has been an understatement. First, I applied for what I considered similar jobs. Then I said to myself, okay, apply for the next level. Then I started taking more free online classes and really looked at my life and thought to myself. . . well, what do you think you do best and would you like to do? Then I went to the next level of good, I can do anything and I will accept anything. This is what I found.

  1. It is extremely difficult to get a job when you reach 40 years old. For whatever reason, it's seen as a liability and your experience doesn't seem to matter anymore.
  2. You can hear several things in the voice of the recruiter or hiring company.
    1. They think you'll leave if you get better.
    2. They are concerned about their previous salary and about matching it. It really doesn't matter how many different ways you try to tell them how flexible you are, money matters to them.
    3. They worry that even though you are saying all the right things, will you really fit into the culture, at a fast pace, each change (choose the words you see fit) and without saying it outright, are they telling you that you won? to fit in.
    4. They can feel your despair and love it.
  3. Job search engines are incredibly inept. Companies have taken traditional job descriptions and titles and turned them into something more. I can't even begin to tell you how many job inquiries I get when my resume has an impact on sales. I have never been in sales and there is nothing to suggest this on my resume. I also get a lot of visits for jobs that require certifications that I don't have. I would love to think, in addition to all the great things I have done in life, that I am also a nurse, an electrical engineer, a medical doctor, or some medical wonder. I am not. Why am I sharing this? Because it takes an incredible amount of work to get each of the jobs done, see if you are qualified, then be directed to your company's website and then go through the hour-long process to submit your resume. So your personal efficiency is very low at the end of the day.
  4. Times are desperate for me. I've gotten to the point where I'll take anything and everything. But with today's electronic sensing, I can't get past advanced systems for any department store, gas station, drug store, or shopping mall job. I tried to eliminate any schooling, advanced skills, certifications. Basically, I have simplified and simplified it, and these are for jobs that pay minimum wage.
  5. I have overused state resources and conducted all sorts of evaluation tests that have so far come to nothing.
  6. Despite what some may think, it takes money to make money. What I mean by this is that most states don't help you. Fortunately I receive food assistance, but not medical assistance or cash assistance. Let me also be perfectly clear to everyone on this. Getting food stamps means you can ONLY use them for food. Do you know what it is like to have no toilet paper these days? It's awful! It doesn't matter not having money for other necessities like shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, laundry detergent, dish soap, etc. I think people forget that there are needs beyond food that most don't even realize how blessed they are to have them on a daily basis. My daughter receives medical assistance because she is still in school, but that is it. The reason we are alive is because my family helps me when they can and, in return, I live frugally. It's not uncommon for them to turn off the electricity and water simply because I can't pay the bill. So let's talk about Maslow's hierarchy of needs. They are feeding us, the rest is a stressful daily gamble. Sometimes I can get my meds, most of the time I have to give them up. I just pray every day that my daughter doesn't find me dead. She found her father dead and it wouldn't be right for her to find me. Instead, he's had to watch me have seizures because, for whatever reason, my brain gets stressed sometimes. I have NO idea how that could happen. But that's okay, let's assume I have the lower levels of Maslow's needs covered. When you have no money, How do you get the fuel to go to the job resource centers, the library to use the Internet to take courses, and then there are the job interviews themselves? There is NO help when you are down.

Would you say I'm lazy? Hell no! Like you, I live to fight the fight every day. I've just shifted my focus to the immediate because some days it's hard to get through the day and looking forward can make me feel depressed. I live for my daughter and I pray that we can celebrate Christmas and birthdays again. I pray I don't always have to say, "Sorry, we can't go anywhere fun." I pray that I don't feel so bad about not taking my medication so that I can get up and function every day. . . . But most importantly, I pray for a job so I can feel normal again. When I'm not looking for a job, I keep trying to improve. I have learned that I am a good cook and how far I can stretch my food. I have learned how expensive it is to buy a loaf of bread instead of making it yourself. I have taught myself to sew better. I am probably also considered a cross stitch expert and personally I am so proud of all my finished but unframed work that I could scream. When I run out of floss, fabric, whatever, I move on to a new skill that I still have supplies for (remember, I used to have money). I took over 20 years of flute lessons when I was young. I've forgotten many things due to seizures, so what a perfect opportunity to get my books out and try again. I always try to say positive and by nature, luckily, I am a positive person. I will not lie, I have often thought that it would be much easier for everyone if I was not here anymore, but my faith and my personal beliefs would never allow it. Most importantly, I would never, ever do that to my only daughter.

I'm sure I've said a lot more than you ever wanted to hear, but it's not about poor, uneducated people who want to make a living off the "system." I am poor now, but I have a university degree, an MBA, I am a certified Help Desk Manager, I have a master's certificate in IT project management, I have a master's certificate in Human Resources Personnel and Industrial Relations, I am certified At Targeting Selection, I have taught courses at both the undergraduate and MBA levels, and have worked for nearly 30 years starting at the bottom and working up the corporate IT ranks. . . . and I'm unemployed. I hang out with old colleagues and meet new people all the time. I am still unemployed. Most of the people I have met in my position are like me. Lazy is never, never a word that has come to mind. As horrified as I am to be in this position, I also know that if I don't share my own experiences, ignorance of what our politicians share will cloud normal people's thinking. There is no trickle down effect from companies to their employees. You are only as worthy as the company feels you are at any given time. You can work 7 times a week like me for many years in many different companies, and I can promise you that the only thing that matters to them is the bottom line and what you have done for me lately. Do not get sick, do not have a sick family member, do not have any traumatic event in your life, or show signs of weakness because someone will use it against you at some point. The utilities do not care that you are unemployed or offer subsidies to help you. Don't be fooled by the commercials you see on television. Do your own research, draw your own conclusions, and realize that each state has different programs with different rules and regulations. I can tell you with a high degree of certainty that none of these programs will work in your favor or make you want to stay in that situation. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look very hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also keep smiling and helping others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also keep smiling and helping others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. I will also continue to smile and help others because, although I am unlucky, there is someone next to you who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. I will also continue to smile and help others because, although I am unlucky, there is someone next to you who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. As for me, I need a job, but as long as I keep looking for one, I will also continue to smile and help others because even though I am unlucky, there is someone by your side who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. there is someone next to you who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow. there is someone next to you who is as hungry as you are. If I've eaten today, I'll give you my sandwich. If I haven't eaten today, I'll give you half of my sandwich. If you look really hungry, I'll give you my whole sandwich because I can eat tomorrow.

In fact, getting a job is difficult for most people. Why? Because, for some strange reason, no one has yet developed a true market for jobs and talent.

In other words, if any other market were as inefficient as the so-called "labor market," we wouldn't call it markets in the first place.

But let's make a bulleted list of some quick specific problems and keep it short. In no particular order:

1. Resume Spam - Job seekers apply for every job they can find, even if they're not really a good fit for that position. Employers know this, so they do their best to filter out all "resume spam."

Keep reading

In fact, getting a job is difficult for most people. Why? Because, for some strange reason, no one has yet developed a true market for jobs and talent.

In other words, if any other market were as inefficient as the so-called "labor market," we wouldn't call it markets in the first place.

But let's make a bulleted list of some quick specific problems and keep it short. In no particular order:

1. Resume Spam - Job seekers apply for every job they can find, even if they're not really a good fit for that position. Employers know this, so they do their best to filter out all "resume spam." As a result, genuinely qualified candidates are more likely to be overlooked.

2. Too expensive to publish most jobs: It is true that there are not enough jobs for everyone, but not for the reasons you think. It turns out that most companies cannot afford to publish most of their work! Surprised? It shouldn't be - standard job posting costs range from $ 75- $ 500 per job posting, by zip code / region, per 30-day period. LinkedIn starts at a ridiculous $ 295. Subscription fees can cost many thousands of dollars for large corporations. So what becomes a major expense for a large company is a virtually disabling expense for smaller companies and startups.

3. Expensive prepaid solutions with no guarantee of real success: For job seekers willing to take a more premium approach, most of the existing options require expensive prepaid job seeker plans that you have to pay for even if you don't. get something out of it. In other words, there is no "pay only if you win" solution. (Actually, there is now, but I'm trying not to make a cheeky plug ... yet. :)) LinkedIn, for example, asks job seekers to pay a staggering $ 30 or $ 50 per month alone to be able to send 5 or 10 InMail messages (unsolicited), respectively, and 15 or 25 "introductions", respectively. First of all, InMail messages don't really work; everyone seems to know now, and secondly, you are still at the mercy of someone else to introduce you. Good luck with that.

4. Expensive prepaid solutions say nothing to employers: So an employer sees that you have paid money to get to the top of the candidate list for all jobs overall. How do they know that you are actually a good fit for their particular job? They do not do it. So either (a) they will still overlook you or (b) they will contact you and 90-95% will likely decide that you are not a good fit after all. Your time and money are a waste. Again.

5. Expensive prepaid or postpaid solutions blatantly benefit wealthier job seekers - these systems are often "promotional" in nature rather than truly functional "filter mechanisms" to precisely match job seekers to jobs perfect for your particular skills. They work effectively like eBay's "promote your item" feature, where you can pay more to enlarge your list, display eye-catching icons, and more. LinkedIn even admits this: "Move your job applications to the top of the candidate list."

6. Psychological and practically exhausting - If you really want to have any chance in the standard "job application with resume" approach, it takes a lot of work and effort and therefore time and therefore money - resumes and letters Diligently crafted presentation slides should be personalized for each and every position for which you are applying. This is exhausting and psychologically draining - job seekers generally never hear from the companies they applied to. It's like when you were in high school (college?) And you finally mustered the courage to call that girl you wanted to take on a movie date, and when she didn't answer her phone, you decided it would be really manly. leave a message. The problem then is that you spent the next few hours or days pacing back and forth in agony waiting for (a) she to finally call you back or (b) it would take another three days to be able to call her again. That sucked then, and it sucks now. With jobs or with girls.

7. No automatic match: Finally, there is no true automatic match between job applicants and the best jobs for their particular skills. For example, this is the 21st century: a job seeker should be able to list their skills, abilities, professions, personal characteristics, personality type and be automatically matched - and contacted by - an employer with the job most relevant to that. particular person, for a few dollars more or less, if and only if the employer really wants to communicate with that person. No application, no waiting, no effort. That would be amazing.

And now, my little plug: our startup, Venturocket.com, has been created specifically to solve points 1 to 6 above precisely by doing the number 7. And that's it, I'm not going to say anything more about this. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Oh, and by the way, at the end of February 2013, we are ready to hire our first employee! We need a member of the UI / UX team of the amazing website, who hopefully can also use mobile devices. I'm sure you can find out how we would like you to apply. :)

Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

Then why

Keep reading

Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

So why doesn't everyone get the first job they apply for? (Perhaps these are clearer questions that get to the heart of what you are asking?)

One reason is that the hiring is broken. It is largely a guessing game. The resume is an imperfect tool for demonstrating the critical skills and experience that many jobs require; the interview doesn't measure those actual skills, it just asks you to talk about them; And hiring managers are not hiring experts, they are usually experts in their field of choice.

Managers don't think critically about what they really need from an employee (they really need), and HR departments don't do a good job of helping them define (and make known) those skills and needs. That means that you, as an applicant, read a list of job titles and requirements, and you have to guess if you are fit or not. (So ​​you hedge your bets and apply for a bunch of jobs that you are not fit for, or just WANT to be fit for.)

Develop a resume that consists of a set of words that you have carefully selected and placed in a way that you think will be interesting to the person reading it, and it may or may not be. And you never really find out how it worked (unless you get an interview).

Interviewers ask a lot of questions that don't make sense or don't help them assess whether you would be a good employee or not. They ask stupid questions for which you have a predefined answer, or they ask questions that they should in no way trust your answer. Interviewers have “favorite” questions that they believe are divine “true” answers, but are actually trick questions that the interviewer interprets through their own biases and experience.

Interviews rarely give a candidate the opportunity to really demonstrate their expertise or ease in the skills they will use on the job. The interview is an artificial environment, and it is a scenario that hardly anyone will ever create again when doing their job. Candidates won't talk about what they do, they will. Interviews hire good storytellers.

There is also a strange imbalance of power in hiring. Companies seem to want to keep actual qualifications for the job secret. (This may be because they are very poorly defined and threats of legal action for some of the real reasons. Often times, critical skills for office jobs are work ethic, passion, drive, tact, self-motivation, independence, smart politics, etc., how do you interview someone for those things?) Most of the people you interview are rejected for rather minor reasons. "Cultural adjustment" is a big problem (what does that really mean?). Sometimes a question is answered in a bit of a roundabout way, but the hiring team places enormous importance on anything strange and they tend to exaggerate things. Full candidates are rejected on the mere suspicion of a hiring manager about a given answer! A suspicion!

Candidates often don't have enough information (or power) to ask meaningful questions in return. They have the company's website, Glassdoor, and maybe a friend or two to ask about what the job really entails, or what it's really like to work there, and then if they get an offer, they just accept it.

Interestingly, hiring managers almost always tell us that they don't want to accept the first candidate they interview. Even when that person is a perfect fit! They want to compare them to someone else! Now that's probably pretty understandable, in a way, but I guess hiring would be "easier" for about 15% of openings if the hiring manager hired that perfect first candidate without knowing anyone else. fifteen%!

Finally, some jobs are really complex. They really require what we call a "purple squirrel". It can be two jobs mixed into one and may require a strange combination of strange skills. Every company is different at any point in its history, and matching your current situation with the people who do your work can be tricky. The team you will join is also filled with unique people with their own abilities, flaws, political leanings, and finding the right mix to complement / fight / improve those people is somewhat tricky.

Entire books have been written on these challenges, but few accept the solutions that are offered. Solutions can be time consuming, expensive, and even add significant complexity to a process that you already consider "difficult." Maybe one day you'll be a hiring manager or in charge of hiring, and you can join me in trying to make things better!

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.