How can someone get a job in Sydney or Melbourne?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Connor Hart



How can someone get a job in Sydney or Melbourne?

I can't tell if this question is serious or if it's just someone frustrated because they can't find a job. Regardless, you must submit an application.

Go to GumTree and bookmark the jobs page. Update it as often as possible and fire up your resume. If you have a phone number, CALL. Business is done over the phone. If you are not comfortable with calls, work on that first.

The other option is SEEK - Australia's no. 1 job, employment, career and hiring site. I have some friends who have been successful with this, but it is not very high.

My friend and I found a job two weeks after landing in Melbourne. It takes a lot of application, but you will find one.

Go into business too. It is much easier to be remembered when someone can put a face or even a voice / attitude to a name.

For me it is an easy decision. Take a domestic flight ... or even google maps these days ... fly over Sydney, fly our Melbourne ... tell me which one would you rather live in?

To the top answer I've seen ... I couldn't disagree more with the restaurant scene. Melbourne people really think they realize food and coffee ... honestly you can get good coffee and good food for a decent price almost anywhere in Australia, get over it Melbourne, you really are not the only one here. Maybe you were 20 years ago?

Sports, no doubt Melbourne kills it over Sydney. But. I hate most sports. I hate the concept of treating sports heroes

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For me it is an easy decision. Take a domestic flight ... or even google maps these days ... fly over Sydney, fly our Melbourne ... tell me which one would you rather live in?

To the top answer I've seen ... I couldn't disagree more with the restaurant scene. Melbourne people really think they realize food and coffee ... honestly you can get good coffee and good food for a decent price almost anywhere in Australia, get over it Melbourne, you really are not the only one here. Maybe you were 20 years ago?

Sports, no doubt Melbourne kills it over Sydney. But. I hate most sports. I hate the concept of treating sports heroes as role models. They were the bullies at school most of the time, let's be honest. They're binge drinking with paid assholes who have to take media counseling to learn to behave like normal, well-adjusted human beings. What has sport done to promote humanity other than actually help us adjust steroids and peptides? I don't know why children need athletes as role models. Virtually none of them will make a living from any kind of sport.

Sydney is gorgeous. I have never met anyone who has not seen the ocean. I say that is a lie. Not only is it beautiful, but it is fairly uncrowded. I travel a lot. Compared to New York, Miami, Chicago, New Orleans, DC, Tokyo, Bangkok, London ... You can eat and drink at the opera bar on Friday nights and always get a table, always have a beer on the hand in 5 minutes and you're sitting underneath the opera house looking at the harbor bridge. You could go to the Deck and Luna Park on the other side of the harbor and share the bar with about 15 people.

You can get anywhere in an Uber in 10 minutes. Circular Quay, North Sydney, Darling Harbor, Kings Cross, Double Bay, Glebe, Pyrmont. From one side of the city to the other. Easily. You can hop on a train at the airport and get off in the heart of the city in about 12 minutes. I do it daily.

Melbourne sucks. I am there every week. Is flat. Is coffee. It's boring. It's so ugly that they line the streets with sculptures because God, what else would you look at?

Give me a coffee or a beer in a park or in a bar overlooking a harbor, lake, ocean. Give me a ferry ticket instead of a tram ticket to get to and from work. Oh yeah ... Sydney doesn't have trams (we have a couple of light rail systems that are quite nice and neat) ... so when you look up the view is not a bunch of cables all over the city like Melbourne . .

And Sydney doesn't use hook turns to turn right at an intersection. Because. Well. Who could?

—- August 2019 update

Thought I'd add this here for additional information. It was a comment on another answer to the question that was having trouble with some of my points. So for clarity ... and you can find that answer below somewhere.

////

I started writing this because it seemed like you had a misunderstanding, or a problem, with a comment I made that "I travel a lot."

That was not a statement that Sydney people travel more. We all travel. I get it. It was just a reference to the fact that I see many global cities, constantly, in a 9-5, going to the office, sitting in traffic, taking the capacity of public transport. It wasn't a boast that Sydney's people were more worldly. I caught 87 flights in 2018. A little more than my 2017 record. I see a lot of Melbourne, as well as many other major cities, constantly. I did not vacation in them or live in them 10 years ago.

So as I write ... a few more comments, I thought I'd vent, knowing full well that no champion from one city will convince the other that they are right.

1. You win. Reporters who write the top 10 articles to fill in some content for their editors always know best.

2. Coffee. Agree to disagree. If you can't have good coffee in Sydney OR Melbourne, you are an idiot (not you personally). I would put my local roaster, Deluca, against anything available in Melbourne or London.

3. I'm not sure why you need big pockets to eat in Sydney. Not all of us go to Rockpool to go out to dinner or go out to dinner on the weekend. That's the same as me assuming when Melbourne Vue De Monde or Attica are my only options. And $ 60 + for parking is typically a Monday through Friday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. fee. CBD has flat rate parking after 6:00 pm Monday through Friday and on weekends. Typically $ 15-20. Or ample street parking at $ 3-4 per hour. An Uber costs less than $ 20 from my apartment to the cbd, depending on the Uber class.

Tonight I will drive 20 minutes to the dear port. Pay $ 20 for parking and try one of the 29 new restaurants and cafes that just opened this week. My guess would be $ 80 to $ 120 for the two of us depending on the wines. I could name a dozen or more areas in the CBD like this one. Surroundings of Darling Quarter, Darling Harbor, King Street Wharf, Cockle Bay, Tram Sheds, Woolloomooloo Wharf, Kensington Street, The Rocks, Pyrmont, Barangaroo, Circular Quay. Hundreds of places to eat without hate at half price. And a bunch of 1,2 shady spots ... and the highest number (3) of 3 shady spots.

(I just did a rough review of the Goodfood Guide 2019, the folks who award these hats to Australian restaurants ... our version of Michelin actually.)

NSW = 79 restaurants with hats

VIC = 67 restaurants with hats

And I guess on the subject of deep pockets ... we live in a modest 2 bedroom, 1 bedroom studio apartment. Newly built, off plan, 15 minute walk to a bayside beach, 13 minute drive to 3 coastal beaches. 20 minute drive from CBD. It costs $ 900k. The mortgage is roughly what we were paying for rent. We are not rich. Both high school, good careers, but in terms of housing, we have the least expensive house / apartment in my social group. Sub 1 million. Which is standard for an average Sydney residence I think.

4. Not sure which city you are saying is cleanest? By world standards, I consider both to be the cleanest cities in the world that I travel to. Maybe Auckland, Singapore got over it ... Tokyo ... meh ... it's clean ... but ... dirty? No trash anyway, but a homeless problem, and the road walls always seem black and sooty to me.

5. You win. But sports suck.

6. You have confused me here. Sydney does not have a grid. It is a labyrinth. I guess each his own. I hate the New York network. I hate Canberra. Melbourne doesn't bother me too much. But I find planned CBD boring. Give me an organic urban maze any day. Google maps make everything navigable.

7. I find that Melbourne people don't really care how they look. Football caps with business suits. No one seems concerned about their appearance or cares what other people think. Maybe it's a good thing. My opinion is mainly based on the flinders street station and its surroundings. Sydney is vain. A generalization I know. But people take to Instagram to see how good they look. In winter we all have layers. It's 8-15 most nights in winter. Boots. Trench scarves. It is not unique. We just don't freeze when we remove them.

Finally...

I spent over 2 hours at 12:30 pm going from Melbourne airport to the Hyatt last week. A Tuesday. I couldn't disagree more with anyone who tells me that Melbourne's traffic is better than Sydney's. Maybe I just don't expose myself to that in Sydney. By world standards, I think both cities have practically no traffic.

I think I would always prefer a nice city to a functional one. But ultimately, both have their charms and drawbacks in both categories.

Sorry for the long comment. The misconception of "traveling a lot" bothered me. I had to get it out of my system.

Hello there

Is not difficult. Simply speaking from personal experience and not from anyone else's experiences.

I am spending time writing this because I want you to come here and help Australia with your skills. We need trained people. Many of you.

I studied Masters in Australia. I came back to India and got about a year of work experience and got technical certification.

I returned to Australia (Sydney) and got a job in a few days. It was a contract position. But my day usually started at 4 PM implementing software at a law firm. This gave me ample opportunity to attend other interviews during

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Hello there

Is not difficult. Simply speaking from personal experience and not from anyone else's experiences.

I am spending time writing this because I want you to come here and help Australia with your skills. We need trained people. Many of you.

I studied Masters in Australia. I came back to India and got about a year of work experience and got technical certification.

I returned to Australia (Sydney) and got a job in a few days. It was a contract position. But my day usually started at 4 PM implementing software at a law firm. This gave me ample opportunity to attend other interviews during the day. I would have applied for at least 100 jobs and attended 25 interviews. Almost one every day. I got a full-time position in a month or so. I've never looked back again.

To get a job:

  1. Be prepared to do whatever job you get. I worked at the BP gas station for the first few weeks
  2. Be modest in interviews. Do not oversell. This starts from the recruiters to the technical managers of the company you will be working for. Do not push. Did I say 'Be modest'? It is a great disappointment when you are insistent. The right recruiters and managers will see what you are worth to them if you are modest
  3. Interviews are about evaluating the person you are more than your technical skills. At the end of the day, the interviewers assess your ability to work as a team. After all, you will be spending at least 38 hours a week with your colleagues. You can learn new technologies, but you cannot learn skills and attitudes.
  4. Research the company you will be working for before going to the interview. This will show the hiring team that you are genuinely interested in the company and willing to contribute.
  5. Prepare for the interview, there are many interview techniques on the internet. Prepare for at least the 10 most likely questions. This also helps, as you are not making up answers. It just presents adequate and well-researched answers. It takes away the advantage of the interview. Makes you look smart and confident
  6. In the interview, talk about why you will fit the position and be useful to the company. Stay away from your personal ambitions and expectations unless they ask.
  7. If you think you will not fit the position or have nothing to offer, do not apply for it or attend the interview. Do everyone a favor and invest this time in a job that you are truly qualified for and interested in.
  8. Be confident to get a job. There is always another interview around the corner. Be positive at all times. This will show up in the interview. It's not the end of the world if you don't get this job
  9. There are many jobs in Australia. Put your foot somewhere. Any job. We need trained people like you to help our country
  10. Don't expect immediate returns on your investment. Believe in return on investment over a period of time. Keep trying
  11. Please take this with a grain of salt. Australia is much more. Don't just think of it as a place to earn money. Australia is a melting pot of cultures. Australia is made by immigrants. It is wrong to think that immigrants do not get a job, as it is not true. Here you can learn a lot about other cultures and food. You are destined to become a tolerant person. A tolerant person is more peaceful than a successful person in life.
  12. Getting a job that suits your college degree doesn't mean you're not fulfilling your destiny. I know many friends who started stacking aisles in supermarkets and worked their way up to store managers. Of course they pay them well
  13. Australia is an egalitarian society. You are not respected for your position or the amount of money you have. You are respected because you are honest, trustworthy, and modest.
  14. Want to learn new things. When learning stops, you stop growing as a person. It is not uncommon in Australia for people to change careers. Even if it means starting as an apprentice in the new career
  15. While working here in Australia, you will find that money won't make you happy, but learning new things will.
  16. Be open to understanding that the work culture in Australia may be different than where you are from. We believe in efficiency more than the number of hours you spend at your desk

Australia has a minimum wage, so even if you earn minimum wage, your lifestyle will not be that different from other well-off people.

Please come here, keep trying, don't give up, feel genuinely interested in the language, the culture, the nature, the people. Accept and Australia will accept you. We need you. All the best to you.

I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent Acquisition Managers and Internal Recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get an idea of ​​how

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I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent acquisition managers and internal recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get a feel for candidates. As someone mentioned, there are no filters or restrictions for submitting a resume to a job posting on a job site. In fact, LinkedIn does not select a candidate, although now they have started adding criteria questions that help eliminate a good part of the demographic. But for most, it is a generic entry for submitting a resume. And anyone can do it. Indeed and LinkedIn also have an "easy app", which functionally simplifies candidate presentation. Basically, you pre-upload your resume and submit it with a click of the button. But on the other hand, he's shooting darts in the dark. A candidate can submit endless resumes for a position, hoping to find one that sticks but usually doesn't.

In my opinion, the best approach to finding a new role that has consistently worked for me is three-fold:

  1. Outside Recruiters - No matter how much you think a broker representing you doesn't quite reflect your work experience, they are your ticket to a potential opportunity. Many medium and large companies have expenses allocated to outsourcing (third party) fees. They realize that much of the work needs to be done regarding the screening of new and potential candidates on the front-end and can provide recruiters with a list of prerequisites, requirements, and preferences. That saves them a lot of time, hassle and work as they can now deal with candidates who will likely be qualified. Depending on your industry, look for a handful of recruitment agencies / staffing and network consulting services. Let them know that you are looking for new roles. Even if it is entry level, A recruiter is going to know the roles in a company before they hit the job sites. They tend to have relationships with them that give them an advantage. The best thing is that if you build a connection with them, they will constantly be looking for new roles for you even if you are not looking, which ironically seems to be the best time to land a new role.
  2. Apply directly on the company's website; If you find a job opening that matches your interests and qualifications on any of the employment social sites, go directly to the company's website and apply. This bypasses many of the hurdles that you would get from a site like Monster and posts your resume with the appropriate staff or internal recruiters. It is much more direct and effective.
  3. Email internal recruiters directly; this is a bit more difficult, but it has become much more prevalent. If you will notice on LinkedIn, there are many jobs that are posted, but some are posted by internal recruiters, such as HR. Your name, email address, and sometimes phone numbers are provided to you. That is your best chance, as you can be sure that your resume will go directly to the person you are working for a position. Provide a cover letter, be personal by addressing them by name, and send it out. 9 times out of 10, the HR recruiter will thank you for the submission, which helps significantly.

Unfortunately, the unskilled entry-level jobs here always have a lot of people applying for them, and local experience is highly valued. An example is when I applied for a job for a new Kmart in Point Cook. I think they had 3 interview sessions where there were probably over 200 people in the whole room during 1 session. Generally, the competition is quite stiff for retail jobs and you can forget about any office administration job; They will almost always choose someone with experience, as there are many people who want to work on it.

What I found is that networking with other people is

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Unfortunately, the unskilled entry-level jobs here always have a lot of people applying for them, and local experience is highly valued. An example is when I applied for a job for a new Kmart in Point Cook. I think they had 3 interview sessions where there were probably over 200 people in the whole room during 1 session. Generally, the competition is quite stiff for retail jobs and you can forget about any office administration job; They will almost always choose someone with experience, as there are many people who want to work on it.

What I have found is that networking with other people is the way to get a job here. I'm afraid I can't give much advice on how to do this for unskilled entry-level jobs. Cold calling and small business resume delivery is something you can try, you just never know where the next job opportunity will come from.

The way to avoid this competition is to choose an industry to work in and make sure you have enough skills to work in it. I know the IT industry has meetings on meetup.com that are well attended by IT professionals. There are also professional associations that often hold events in other industries as well.

While it's hard work, the construction industry here has opportunities for blue-collar workers and it pays pretty well, probably better than working in retail here.

Other than that, make sure your resume has no spelling or grammatical errors whatsoever, and the same with your cover letter. I cannot overstate the importance of this.

What you need to watch out for is people offering jobs without the right conditions, especially in the hospitality industry, for example cafes and restaurants. Unfortunately, there have been some cases where companies have exploited foreign workers. Know your rights as an employee and make sure if you work full or part time, you get paid a super annuity. More details can be found at https://www.fairwork.gov.au/pay/minimum-wages.

I guess he doesn't live here right now. The first thing is to prepare a CV. It's okay if you haven't worked much, you still need a CV. Put all of your experience with education, clubs, and other organizations into it, and then trim or tailor it to each job you apply for. Think about the type of job you want. The best job for you has something that is at least a little interesting to you. It naturally makes you better at it and makes the day go by faster. If you live in Melbourne now, go out and walk around all the nearby business places, introduce yourself to the

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I guess he doesn't live here right now. The first thing is to prepare a CV. It's okay if you haven't worked much, you still need a CV. Put all your experience with education, clubs, and other organizations into it, and then trim or tailor it to each job you apply for. Think about the type of job you want. The best job for you has something that is at least a little interesting to you. It naturally makes you better at it and makes the day go by faster. If you live in Melbourne now, go out and walk around all the business locations near you, introduce yourself to the person in charge during off-peak hours (when they have time to talk), tell them you're interested, and leave a CV with them. Check back the following week, even if they tell you the day they are not hiring. Yes no If you live here, save enough money so you can visit for a week and do the same. Don't be discouraged, perseverance and luck sometimes take a while to take effect. Good luck and don't stop until you find what you are looking for. The average worker is said to have eight full-time jobs in his lifetime. You may never stop searching for the right one as your priorities change throughout life, so be good at the process of searching. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. and do the same. Do not be discouraged, perseverance and luck sometimes take a while to take effect. Good luck and don't stop until you find what you are looking for. The average worker is said to have eight full-time jobs in his lifetime. You may never stop searching for the right one as your priorities change throughout life, so be good at the process of searching. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. and do the same. Don't be discouraged, perseverance and luck sometimes take a while to take effect. Good luck and don't stop until you find what you are looking for. The average worker is said to have eight full-time jobs in his lifetime. You may never stop searching for the right one as your priorities change throughout life, so be good at the process of searching. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. Stop until you find what you are looking for. The average worker is said to have eight full-time jobs in his lifetime. You may never stop searching for the right one as your priorities change throughout life, so be good at the process of searching. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. Stop until you find what you are looking for. The average worker is said to have eight full-time jobs in his lifetime. You may never stop searching for the right one as your priorities change throughout life, so be good at the process of searching. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it. Also remember (although the entry level will usually not be ideal) that you are also interviewing them. Unless circumstances absolutely force you to accept a certain job, you have the power to say no; in fact, sometimes that's your only strength in a job, and it's up to you to exercise it.

How difficult is it to get a job in Sydney?

Is not easy. Unless you are well connected in your field, chances are you won't get a job offer easily.

Our job market is built on connections and internal referrals. If you keep doing it for a couple of years, you will eventually get a good, safe job, the hardest part is the first few years.

Many people go through recruiting agencies for contract and temp jobs, and as you move around the block and people get to know you, the connection continues to build and eventually you can get out on your own.

I have 50 people working in my department

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How difficult is it to get a job in Sydney?

Is not easy. Unless you are well connected in your field, chances are you won't get a job offer easily.

Our job market is built on connections and internal referrals. If you keep doing it for a couple of years, you will eventually get a good, safe job, the hardest part is the first few years.

Many people go through recruiting agencies for contract and temp jobs, and as you move around the block and people get to know you, the connection continues to build and eventually you can get out on your own.

I have 50 people working in my department and most of them started as interns, temporary or temporary, and once they proved their worth, I work with our HR department to find them permanent positions within the company.

Good luck with your job search.

Well, there are many ways that you can accomplish this task, the best and easiest is to make use of the Internet to contact many of the companies that are available online. The main advantage of this method is that there are many companies that have an online presence, but when it comes to looking for work, they tend to stick to traditional advertising and marketing methods. That is why it has become increasingly important to use all available means such as search engines, websites, email directories, classifieds, and websites that can help you find a job.

One time

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Well, there are many ways that you can accomplish this task, the best and easiest is to make use of the Internet to contact many of the companies that are available online. The main advantage of this method is that there are many companies that have an online presence, but when it comes to looking for work, they tend to stick to traditional advertising and marketing methods. That is why it has become increasingly important to use all available means such as search engines, websites, email directories, classifieds, and websites that can help you find a job.

Once you have started your job search, the next step is to develop the skills necessary to secure the position. Many job seekers are afraid to apply because they are concerned that they may not have the required skills or qualifications, but this is no longer true as there are many online training sites these days that provide resources and information on the various courses on offer. . They're available. If you don't know anything about a particular topic, you can turn to these sites for information and guidance on what to do to secure the job. You will be able to learn about different skills and how they would benefit you when it comes to finding a suitable job.

Once you have developed your skills, you will need to apply for the jobs you find. When it comes to applying for a part-time job in Melbourne, you should always try to be very aggressive in your approach to securing a position. It is important that you keep your CV up to date, always make sure to follow up on the contacts you make and always remember that it is a good idea to try to be persistent in your job search, even if possible. Take some time. Remember that with patience and hard work you will eventually find a job that suits you and is worth working for.

REASON 1: Low levels of
English proficiency English fluency plays an important role in your job search in Australia.
Experts suggest that mentioning your IELTS score to demonstrate your English proficiency can help with your application.
Alternatively, if you are unsure of your English language skills, you can improve them through a course.

REASON 2: Experience discrimination in job search and interview and selection processes
Nadine Liddy, who serves as the National Coordinator of the Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network Australia (MYAN), which is the

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REASON 1: Low levels of
English proficiency English fluency plays an important role in your job search in Australia.
Experts suggest that mentioning your IELTS score to demonstrate your English proficiency can help with your application.
Alternatively, if you are unsure of your English language skills, you can improve them through a course.

REASON 2: Experience discrimination in job search and in the interview and selection processes
Nadine Liddy, who serves as the National Coordinator of Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network Australia (MYAN), which is the highest national body on multicultural youth issues, says : "Racism and discrimination in the job market ... There are often stories about young people who choose a more Anglo-Saxon name on a CV and are more likely to get a job interview. And some of that racism and discrimination is more structural and some of it is much more abducted. "

REASON 3: Lack of relevant occupational skills or evidence of past experience
This includes limited work experience and lack of recognition of prior learning and qualifications.
These issues cause people of ethnic origins to do informal and casual jobs within their own communities, such as being employed at a corner store, fast food chains, local community businesses where experience or skills are often not needed in the English language.

In Australia, most jobs are classified as clerical jobs (office work, doctors, lawyers, etc.) and manual jobs (tradesmen). You won't be able to make money at the entry level of most jobs unless you are very smart. However, as your experience and knowledge grows, you should be able to earn a good salary (minimum around $ 80K) in the following jobs:

White Collar - Doctors, Dentists, Lawyers, Bankers, Financial Services Industries, Real Estate, IT Specialist, Safety & Return to Work, Procurement

sales: doctor and pharmacist; IT services, consumer goods, security

Blue collar - pl

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In Australia, most jobs are classified as clerical jobs (office work, doctors, lawyers, etc.) and manual jobs (tradesmen). You won't be able to make money at the entry level of most jobs unless you are very smart. However, as your experience and knowledge grows, you should be able to earn a good salary (minimum around $ 80K) in the following jobs:

White Collar - Doctors, Dentists, Lawyers, Bankers, Financial Services Industries, Real Estate, IT Specialist, Safety & Return to Work, Procurement

sales: doctor and pharmacist; IT services, consumer goods, security

Blue Collar - Plumbing, Locksmith, Handyman, Construction Related Trades, Heavy Vehicle Mechanic, Electricians.

Note that you can also get a job in the government and grow to almost any level.

Talk about asking a controversial question, probably even more controversial than global warming!

I have lived in Sydney (with some overseas assignments and unfortunate trips to Melbourne) for the past 40 years.

The best thing about Melbourne is the flight back to Sydney at 5pm.

Sydney has the Harbor Bridge, the Opera House, the Darling Harbor, the beautiful Sydney Harbor, miles and miles of incredible waves and quiet beaches, a train to the airport ...

Melbourne has a river upside down…. One with the mud on top!

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