How can I survive two 14-hour shifts in a row?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Ben King



How can I survive two 14-hour shifts in a row?

Go to sleep as soon as possible. Depending on how far away you live and how well you can sleep (sometimes paradoxically more difficult when you're extremely tired), you may not even have enough time to get a good night's sleep.

Get food for home in advance. If you're stuck, just get it - your time is more valuable than a few dollars or your long-term need for a healthier diet (not that all restaurant food is very unhealthy). It is understood that other things, like using the bathroom at home, will further reduce the time you have and need to eat something. You can skip something that is not easy

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Go to sleep as soon as possible. Depending on how far away you live and how well you can sleep (sometimes paradoxically more difficult when you're extremely tired), you may not even have enough time to get a good night's sleep.

Get food for home in advance. If you're stuck, just get it - your time is more valuable than a few dollars or your long-term need for a healthier diet (not that all restaurant food is very unhealthy). It is understood that other things, like using the bathroom at home, will further reduce the time you have and need to eat something. You can skip something that is not essential, like washing your hair or using gel.

Have your clothes ready for both days so you can get dressed quickly. Prepare them after you get home from work or some time before you go to sleep, not when you wake up the next day. Anything else you need to take with you, have it ready too so you can quickly pick it up before you leave, although if it's food you may have to keep it in your fridge or freezer, obviously.

Depending on where you work, you may or may not be able to drop off your lunch or other necessary items at work ahead of time, although even then, you will need to carry things like your keys, cards, and whatever else you need afterward. work or really don't want to lose. If you are unable or unwilling to bring lunch for 2 days at a time, please bring the next day's lunch instead of the lunch you expect to eat, and eat the lunch that you brought the day before. That way you won't forget to bring lunch, and if you do, you can bring it later.

Grunt back to awareness ... all from the brain, to notice that feelings shift to the head as the mind stretches to accommodate the space in front of our eyes; dreams while working in a job is your answer. Thought in sharp contrast occupies a position where the mind catches focus within the mind ... it does not extend to dreams that ease our way through the mind to the environment in which we live functioning —-

Many people have done this for months. I did it myself once for 15 months straight (not counting the mid-tour leave) during the surge in Iraq in 2006 and 2007, with only 4 days off in that entire period.

As someone who has done it on several occasions in Iraq and Afghanistan in both combat weapons and intelligence, both in the Army and as a contractor, I can tell you that it does not happen without fatigue. With a lack of sleep and fun, it's easy to fall into a rut and lose productivity, especially in a job that is primarily mental / intellectual in nature.

What most (all?) Of us do to cope

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Many people have done this for months. I did it myself once for 15 months straight (not counting the mid-tour leave) during the surge in Iraq in 2006 and 2007, with only 4 days off in that entire period.

As someone who has done it on several occasions in Iraq and Afghanistan in both combat weapons and intelligence, both in the Army and as a contractor, I can tell you that it does not happen without fatigue. With a lack of sleep and fun, it's easy to fall into a rut and lose productivity, especially in a job that is primarily mental / intellectual in nature.

What most (all?) Of us do to cope is adopt a routine. We make sure to leave OCD for a workout almost daily, we walk to eat with our co-workers at least once per shift, and we usually have a bedtime routine that involves falling asleep with a book or your Favorite TV series on a laptop or notebook. DVD Player. Even when roughing it up on a remote patrol base, this has been the norm in my experience. All of these things help you get through the day and give you little things to look forward to.

Exactly 20 hours every day would be a rarity. I have worked long periods where I worked 120-130 hours a week, but those are usually cases where a very real mission objective prompts you to do so and motivation is not an issue. The mission becomes all you think about, and when you go to bed at night, the last thing you think about is the first thing you will have to accomplish when you wake up. I've even done straight 36 hour shifts and 48 to 72 hour missions with little to no sleep. These don't happen without a crash at the end. Dream debt must always be paid at some point.

Coming home from a rotation like that always requires a little adjustment. You may jolt awake when you begin to fall asleep every night, or experience almost unbearable discomfort from not being so busy all the time. It happens over time.

It is really difficult to work more than, say, 60 hours a week. There are a number of studies showing that as the typical workweek passes in hours worked, efficiency drops and errands / real life start to get in the way. And then it turns out that your 12-hour day was really a 9.5-hour day because of your long lunch (you deserve it!) That hour of ping pong, and chilling out a bit, no matter what errand you ran in no time. .

When I was working for contract, I wrote a utility to keep track of my actual working time. I checked in when I logged out, when I went to the bathroom or kitchen, etc. I was averaging 70 to 75 hours a day.

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It is really difficult to work more than, say, 60 hours a week. There are a number of studies showing that as the typical workweek passes in hours worked, efficiency drops and errands / real life start to get in the way. And then it turns out that your 12-hour day was really a 9.5-hour day because of your long lunch (you deserve it!) That hour of ping pong, and chilling out a bit, no matter what errand you ran in no time. .

When I was working for contract, I wrote a utility to keep track of my actual working time. I logged when I logged out, when I went to the bathroom or kitchen, etc. It averaged 70 to 75 hours a week billable for about six months. I did very little more than work and went home where I lived alone. No television, no movies. Just work and home / sleep, and an occasional phone call. I have relaxed my definitions to be more human since then.

There have been intervals of up to two months where I had to work harder. The worst was a three-week period where I worked more than 100 hours a week, averaging 14 hours a day, 7 days a week. This was the time I was spending at work and I wasn't cutting off my lunch break (eating at my desk) or the many trips for drinks and pee. For several days a week, I took a 3-5 hour nap on my floor instead of going home. They had food available at work, so I ate it. I would go home every few days to change my clothes, take a shower, and sleep in a bed. There was no time for anything else, just work, lack of sleep, eating and bathing.

It was not sustainable for me and I can be a great worker.

I suspect that people who work 16-20 hours a day survive in a number of ways.

  • By not doing it. They don't really work 16-20 hours a day, unless they only work for a couple of days. Either their work doesn't require concentrated effort and they need to be present but not working for parts of it, or they are taking a lot of downtime with each other.
  • If they're only working that hard for a couple of days, presumably lots of caffeine and sugar to keep you alert and awake.
  • They eliminate everything else except work, and minimize time spent away from work, including commuting, talking on the phone, shopping, or anything else. They eat at their desk / work.
  • They make sure they have mental breaks. Otherwise, your work degrades after a short period, and the quality and quantity of work that you get from you is the same that someone could produce in a shorter time, say 10-12 hours.

99.9% of the people who tell you they work 16 hours a day, 7 days a week for most of the year are not working all that time. The remaining 0.1% are exceptions.

How do you survive working the night shift? I can offer some suggestions from my experience. He had worked the night shift for 6 years out of an 18-year period doing different jobs.

Different people are different, of course. Here are some things that I have learned for myself. Keep in mind that your body may be fine with this change and you may not have the same experiences as me.

Try to establish a pattern if possible. Be aware that working out at night can be tough on your body. I would make the mistake of not getting enough sleep.

Try to establish a sleeping pattern. Realize that you are going to

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How do you survive working the night shift? I can offer some suggestions from my experience. He had worked the night shift for 6 years out of an 18-year period doing different jobs.

Different people are different, of course. Here are some things that I have learned for myself. Keep in mind that your body may be fine with this change and you may not have the same experiences as me.

Try to establish a pattern if possible. Be aware that working out at night can be tough on your body. I would make the mistake of not getting enough sleep.

Try to establish a sleeping pattern. Keep in mind that you are going to need to sleep, so don't try to give up your sleep time. You have to rethink your natural day. Instead of sleeping, for example, from 10 p.m. M. At 6:30 a.m. M., You will have to find out what hours are convenient for you.

Some people say they keep the same hours even on their days off. I always slept like a baby on my days off, twenty-four hours a day on my first day off, but when I got back to work, my body had to restart. This became a routine over time, but it was very hard on my mind and body.

I always came back groggy and a bit drunk after several months. For me, the answer was to go back to the day shift after a period of time. For example, after 6 to 12 months, change back to days if possible. I needed that change.

Remember that your day will be different from other people with a day shift schedule. You will have to realize this and plan to maximize your rest.

You need your adequate rest. Make sure you get enough rest, and if you need more time to sleep, take that time. Your body and mind will appreciate it very much.

If you drink coffee or caffeine, do so in the first few hours of your shift. You don't drink caffeine late at night, maybe you will. If coffee affects your sleep, be sure to take it into account so that you can sleep properly.

Turn off your phone while you sleep. Your sleep time is important. Put up blackout curtains if necessary to help you sleep and let your friends know that you need to sleep. Other people often don't understand this.

Maintain your exercise and health. This is very, very important.

Good luck for you. You'll do fine. Sorry for the novel.

As a trauma educator, I have had to work many 24th shifts. Like doctors, we have on-call rooms to sleep when not needed during our free time. I worked in obstetric surgery as a First Assist Registered Nurse. I enjoyed that in the call room in front of a local hotel room or long distance to the apartment. Most of the guard rooms are equipped with food, refrigerator, microwave, toilet and showers, and television. A kind of mini hotel suite. Some hospitals I have worked in include a key to the doctors' dining room with breakfast, lunch and dinner.

I worked in a hospital during the wildfires. That was a 12 week ER Manager application

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As a trauma educator, I have had to work many 24th shifts. Like doctors, we have on-call rooms to sleep when not needed during our free time. I worked in obstetric surgery as a First Assist Registered Nurse. I enjoyed that in the call room in front of a local hotel room or long distance to the apartment. Most of the guard rooms are equipped with food, refrigerator, microwave, toilet and showers, and television. A kind of mini hotel suite. Some hospitals I have worked in include a key to the doctors' dining room with breakfast, lunch and dinner.

I worked in a hospital during the wildfires. That was a 12 week Emergency Manager position with an upstairs suite made up of a labor and delivery room. All staff were temporary medical staff. We had to stay close to the hospital. I was the only person from out of state. I was always in the hospital with ghost staff sitting in the ER. I put a television in the room for the nurses and the cafe staff filled the room with food and drink for the staff. For staff with asthma, I had oxygen connected in my room on the top floor. I shared a room with another prn staff. I brought cribs and beds from other rooms.

It wasn't a party, more like a MASH unit where we were treating ONLY wildfire patients. The hospital had been closed to tear him down. We made it our home and we still take care of the patients.

This was before Monster drank. Lots of coffee, Coca Cola, foods rich in protein, hot chocolate, sweets, snacks, etc.

So yes, it can be done. We even work in pajamas in crisis mode. But scrubs were the dress code. All patients were classified at the bedside. The most serious patients were referred to several nearby trauma centers for surgery and ICU. We kept some beds open for intensive care patients until we could move them.

We all learned several different languages. French, Spanish Castillo, Hebrew, German, Russian. Many tourists who did not speak English.

Pay: The first 8 hours, regular base salary; 9-12 hours, hour and a half; More than 13 hours double.

Just 1 or constant? 3-12s is awesome! If you have such congratulations, I'm so jealous. However, if you are between the ages of 12 and 6, I am sorry to look back on those days and will let you know what helped me. Now this depends on the field and the type of work, but try to divide the day. If your job involves both computer work and manual work, this is ideal. Set time frames for each one and switch to avoid burnout.

Set a schedule. Give yourself a series of problems and work on them a little bit each day. If your work doesn't have as much freedom or variation, set a personal goal to achieve as you work, I've seen many

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Just 1 or constant? 3-12s is awesome! If you have such congratulations, I'm so jealous. However, if you are between the ages of 12 and 6, I am sorry to look back on those days and will let you know what helped me. Now this depends on the field and the type of work, but try to divide the day. If your job involves both computer work and manual work, this is ideal. Set time frames for each one and switch to avoid burnout.

Set a schedule. Give yourself a series of problems and work on them a little bit each day. If your job doesn't have as much freedom or variation in setting a personal goal to achieve while working out, I've seen many co-workers get exercise clocks that track steps, for example, and compare calories burned at the end of the day.

Energy drinks. Almost everyone in my industry survives on these things.

Home life If you have someone at home who prepares lunches, does laundry, takes care of financing, shopping, and other tasks, that helps a lot. If not, like me, it takes a lot of balance and planning. Pretty much just like vending machines at work. When I was working harder, I slept in my car in the parking lot because my house is 2 hours away in California traffic. I still do that when there's a lot of snow and I know I won't have time to get in and out of the driveway without completely stopping sleeping. So decide if it's really worth coming home, especially if it's short term.

I lived this life ... I worked in a very similar way with several nights not even going home but working, taking a quick shower, and starting over.

I've accomplished a lot in my career and built a wonderful life, so I'm not sure I'd regret it. BUT I do think that I missed opportunities to grow in different ways, I missed opportunities to connect with others, and I missed the point that if we only have one chance in this life, is this how I really want to spend all my time? More specifically, I want the climax of my obituary to be read ... "worked hard." NO!!!!!

I want my obituary

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I lived this life ... I worked in a very similar way with several nights not even going home but working, taking a quick shower, and starting over.

I've accomplished a lot in my career and built a wonderful life, so I'm not sure I'd regret it. BUT I do think that I missed opportunities to grow in different ways, I missed opportunities to connect with others, and I missed the point that if we only have one chance in this life, is this how I really want to spend all my time? More specifically, I want the climax of my obituary to be read ... "worked hard." NO!!!!!

I want my obituary to tell a story of how I positively impacted people and the world around me. I want you to tell all about the places I traveled and the adventures I had. I want it to be full of wonderful stories of moments shared with family and friends. I want to be recognized as a strong leader with high integrity where my word was my bond. I want to be known for constantly challenging myself and others to improve. I want my work to matter, but I don't want it to be the only thing that has done it.

My recommendation would be to set aside a quiet moment to think about how you want your obituary to read, and then make conscious decisions to create that life every day.

There's nothing wrong with your work being important to you, but don't let it be everything. The sad truth is that if you weren't there or did the job, someone else would. I may not be as good as you, but life will go on.

Hope this helps, good luck!

Yes, I had 2 jobs and they both needed me to work on weekends, so I worked from 6 am to 2 pm and then from 2:30 pm to 8:30 pm. The only reason I was able to get through it without hitting full exhaustion was thanks to the added strength of Advil / Tylenol for physical pain in my body and the caffeine to keep me awake during my afternoon shift. Even then, I hit a wall around 6 to 7 p.m. and almost fell asleep during my second shift.

It is too much without painkillers and caffeine, but with them it is doable. It won't kill you, but it's not pretty. I recommend not doing it more than once or twice a month. Make sure

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Yes, I had 2 jobs and they both needed me to work on weekends, so I worked from 6 am to 2 pm and then from 2:30 pm to 8:30 pm. The only reason I was able to get through it without hitting full exhaustion was thanks to the added strength of Advil / Tylenol for physical pain in my body and the caffeine to keep me awake during my afternoon shift. Even then, I hit a wall around 6 to 7 p.m. and almost fell asleep during my second shift.

It is too much without painkillers and caffeine, but with them it is doable. It won't kill you, but it's not pretty. I recommend not doing it more than once or twice a month. Make sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day, prepare meals in advance, have healthy snacks to go, and write down on a piece of paper how much you are going to earn in $$ that day, and put it in front of you to remind you of the reward at the end of the day. . It's usually at least $ 200 in a single day (in my country), which is pretty good.

Don't work yourself to death, but sometimes you have to do stinky things to get where you want to go.

Good luck my friend!

With decent sized breaks, I have only accomplished this by working a day job and then going and working a night job.

I would wake up at 8:30 am slowly getting ready to be and start my daily work working from 10 am to 7 pm with a 'lunch' hour around 2 or 3 pm. At 7, then I would drive to my night job, have something to eat for dinner on the way, arrive at FedEx and work from 8 to midnight and take another 4 hours.

Drive home, try to be in bed at 12:30 am, sleep 8 hours, and get up at 8:30 to do it all over again. Therefore, it would be 14 hours in 2 jobs with 2 hour breaks, pulling

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With decent sized breaks, I have only accomplished this by working a day job and then going and working a night job.

I would wake up at 8:30 am slowly getting ready to be and start my daily work working from 10 am to 7 pm with a 'lunch' hour around 2 or 3 pm. At 7, then I would drive to my night job, have something to eat for dinner on the way, arrive at FedEx and work from 8 to midnight and take another 4 hours.

Drive home, try to be in bed at 12:30 am, sleep 8 hours, and get up at 8:30 to do it all over again. Therefore, it would be 14 hours in 2 jobs with 2 hour breaks, which would be 12 hours of work every day.

While every night of the week was reserved, my weekends were always free to do things with the family. I would finish as much as I could with my family over the weekend, soak up that last moment of relaxation on Sunday night, and start my 60-hour work week again on Monday mornings and woke up at 8:30.

It depends on where you are, but in most states in the US, it's perfectly legal as long as you get paid for the hours worked. Different states have different laws regarding breaks, and I think there are some states that have laws that require a minimum of 8 hours between required shifts (I'm not sure about that though), but as long as the employer follows all of these rules. , it is legal.

First, you don't sit down and get really comfortable. You can fall asleep. Get active, chat with people, eat some snacks or a real meal, wash your face with cold water, go outside for some fresh air. Inactivity is your enemy. Always have a place to go and something to do.

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