How can I negotiate a higher salary after you have already given your salary expectation range?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Archie Walsh



How can I negotiate a higher salary after you have already given your salary expectation range?

I've done this.

In a job interview, I was asked point blank what salary would make me leave the job I was currently working at. I complained and sputtered, knowing it was foolish to answer that question with a figure or even a rank. While sitting in his office, I told my future supervisor that I would not answer the question.

He pushed and pushed for a few more minutes and I gave in. I really wanted the job, had a new baby to support, and couldn't stand a newly hired senior manager at my previous job. There are never good excuses to bargain horribly, but it ended up being compelling enough.

Keep reading

I've done this.

In a job interview, I was asked point blank what salary would make me leave the job I was currently working at. I complained and sputtered, knowing it was foolish to answer that question with a figure or even a rank. While sitting in his office, I told my future supervisor that I would not answer the question.

He pushed and pushed for a few more minutes and I gave in. I really wanted the job, had a new baby to support, and couldn't stand a newly hired senior manager at my previous job. There are never any good excuses to bargain horribly, but it ended up being compelling enough for me.

I gave a figure that I thought was high. It was certainly 166% of what he was earning at the time with a better bonus structure.

He laughed out loud and told me he was too short. It wouldn't occur to him to pay me so little, because it was worth so much more.

When I received the offer, it was about 20k less than what I quoted in the meeting. My follow-up phone call with the HR recruiter was the first and only time that I used the word "mediocre" with such seriousness and such emotion. I declined the offer and told him that if they were serious, they would make an offer that I would consider.

My future supervisor called that day and explained the offer, setting out two alternative offers that I was willing to make. We discussed it and I agreed with one of them. The one I accepted was 5k higher than the quote I gave him at his office. I reminded him of our conversation in his office and he explained that to me as well, saying that he couldn't get approval for the figure he had in mind, but that this position would leave room for growth in the company (position and salary). . Fair enough.

Now I am again in a position where I have to prove my worth, what works for me and my family, but maybe it won't work for you.


I learned not to give a rank or salary when negotiating, but that doesn't help you in this situation.

If this employer values ​​you enough, they will deliver on their counter offer, but know that it will require some tough tactics on your part. You will have to take into account a figure that is the minimum that you will accept. If they decide on something lower, you have to decide to walk away and decline the offer. It is stressful. It's not fun. You will have heart palpitations. Stay the course, if you think your job deserves that higher salary.

You can do it.

It happened to me a few times, but it is pure luck, I will give an example here.

This happened recently, a year ago.

Before joining my current company, I received 6-7 offers and I need to choose the best company. In this process, one day I attended this company interview and was selected after almost 6 rounds of interviews that same day (2 written tests and 4 face-to-face).

After a few days I received a call from Human Resources asking for my expected salary, at that moment I only have an offer in hand for 17 lakhs and I told them the same.

A few days later, they published the offer letter for 18 lakhs, and it is for

Keep reading

It happened to me a few times, but it is pure luck, I will give an example here.

This happened recently, a year ago.

Before joining my current company, I received 6-7 offers and I need to choose the best company. In this process, one day I attended this company interview and was selected after almost 6 rounds of interviews that same day (2 written tests and 4 face-to-face).

After a few days I received a call from Human Resources asking for my expected salary, at that moment I only have an offer in hand for 17 lakhs and I told them the same.

A few days later, they published the offer letter for 18 lakhs and forced me to accept the offer. I told him that I could not assure him that I would join because 18l is a little less and one more offer is on hold and they may give more than this.

They told me they would think about it, but they asked me to do my best to join the company and cut the call.

A few days later, I attended a few more interviews and received offers with 19l and 20l. Now those guys called me again and asked if I was interested in joining their company or not, I told them I got offers for 19l and 20l from other companies, and if they can match with your package I can think about it. Basically I'm not interested in joining that company after visiting it, and I just couldn't tell you this.

After a few days, the HR director called me saying: “We really need this position and we are trying to close it as soon as possible, we even tried to find other candidates but we did not like any of them. So we are ready to give you whatever you want, so that I won't do business again in the future, I want to offer you a fixed 23 lakhs ”and he launched the offer in a few days.

This won't always work and sometimes it just depends on our luck, as if these guys need an urgent requirement so they are willing to pay me whatever. Of course, it also depends on our performance.

There are a couple of ways to do it.

1- The first thing, as has already been outlined in a great answer by Catherine Van Der Laan, is to go for the bust and throw it around.

2- The second is to be a little creative. You can apply for more benefits (or better benefits), a company car or a car allowance, etc. If it is strictly the cash you want, you can go back and tell them:

  • "I appreciate that you have complied with my request for a salary in the range I mentioned."
    • Acknowledge it.
  • "I'm more interested in the position at the top of the range that I suggested."
    • Get what you can out of the "box" you built when
Keep reading

There are a couple of ways to do it.

1- The first thing, as has already been outlined in a great answer by Catherine Van Der Laan, is to go for the bust and throw it around.

2- The second is to be a little creative. You can apply for more benefits (or better benefits), a company car or a car allowance, etc. If it is strictly the cash you want, you can go back and tell them:

  • "I appreciate that you have complied with my request for a salary in the range I mentioned."
    • Acknowledge it.
  • "I'm more interested in the position at the top of the range that I suggested."
    • Get what you can from the "box" you built when you entered the range.
  • "I would appreciate a formal performance review as a written part of this agreement that will allow us to speak again in X days (60 or 90) about another increase in the $ 80k - $ 85k range.
    • Build yourself a cushion to work with while you negotiate. You can choose not to indicate where your next negotiation will begin in this communication, but to save it for review.

The best of luck to you!

The question is why?". You asked for a number and they gave you what you asked for, but now you are asking if it is "appropriate" to ask for more. Why do you ask for more?

There are a few possible scenarios:

  • You want to negotiate simply because you think you should - this is something I would never recommend as it can give employers a negative impression (especially after they have complied with your demand). Imagine walking through a store, seeing a $ 1.99 label on a bag of potato chips, and when you go to the counter to check out, the clerk says, "That bag of potato chips now costs $ 3.50."
  • You have new information
Keep reading

The question is why?". You asked for a number and they gave you what you asked for, but now you are asking if it is "appropriate" to ask for more. Why do you ask for more?

There are a few possible scenarios:

  • You want to negotiate simply because you think you should - this is something I would never recommend as it can give employers a negative impression (especially after they have complied with your demand). Imagine walking through a store, seeing a $ 1.99 label on a bag of potato chips, and when you go to the counter to check out, the clerk says, "That bag of potato chips now costs $ 3.50."
  • You have new information: The new information may be a better understanding of market value, details about expectations that the job will be higher than you anticipated, or more information about a benefits package (medical, PTO, etc.) that could be less than what one might have reasonably expected. In these cases, asking for more is a possibility, but you must justify your reasoning.

Never negotiate "for the sake of negotiation" in situations where your initial demand was met.

How do you know that the higher salary is more reasonable?

I would only recommend asking for a salary outside of the range of expectations you quoted if you have a good offer from another company OR solid information that the offer they made is unreasonable based on the role and reliable knowledge about other salaries in the company.

Even then, the request for a superior offer must be made with sensitivity and without aggression or righteousness. Remember that the offer is based on your expectations. If you start with the lowest salary, can you increase your salary to the desired range within 12 months?

Keep reading

How do you know that the higher salary is more reasonable?

I would only recommend asking for a salary outside of the range of expectations you quoted if you have a good offer from another company OR solid information that the offer they made is unreasonable based on the role and reliable knowledge about other salaries in the company.

Even then, the request for a superior offer must be made with sensitivity and without aggression or righteousness. Remember that the offer is based on your expectations. If you start with the lowest salary, can you increase your salary to the desired range within 12 months and would that be an acceptable compromise for you?

How excited are you to get the new job and what kinds of skills / opportunities will it bring you in the future? Think things through carefully and don't be convinced to quit the job you really want.

The best way to take advantage of your new job offer with your current boss is to start talking to the current boss before you get any new job offers.

The problem with showing your current boss a competitive offer and then asking for a raise is that you will never know the reason if a raise is awarded.

Did you get the raise because the boss felt like you really earned it and you're a strong employee, or did you get the raise because the boss is suffering from really serious retention issues and wants to at least temporarily stop the bleeding? You will eventually find the answer, but by the time you discover the pot

Keep reading

The best way to take advantage of your new job offer with your current boss is to start talking to the current boss before you get any new job offers.

The problem with showing your current boss a competitive offer and then asking for a raise is that you will never know the reason if a raise is awarded.

Did you get the raise because the boss felt like you really earned it and you're a strong employee, or did you get the raise because the boss is suffering from really serious retention issues and wants to at least temporarily stop the bleeding? Eventually you will find the answer, but by the time you find out, the potential damage to your career and situation will be done.

Anyone who tells you that accepting a counter offer is career suicide is probably interested in your not making a counter offer (or in agency recruiters who never benefit from accepting a counter offer). Accepting the counter offer may often have no impact on your future career, either with your company or with future employers.

If you already have the offer and haven't shared it with your boss yet, I would reach out and ask for a raise without mentioning the offer. Do not pose a threat to someone who has not even objected to your request.

The question is, why does he deserve a raise? If the only reason is because someone else has made you a higher offer, the boss is likely to say no (in some industries talent is so scarce that paying more is always an option, or the timing of your request could be for that the boss benefits to overpay him at least temporarily). You need to convince the boss, with proof, that you are worth more than you currently earn.

It seems you have little to lose. Just have a plan. If you ask for a raise and it is denied, will you ask again with the offer letter in hand? Will you quit and tell the boss you have another offer? If you stay for more money or are glad to leave, the decision does not seem that difficult.

You have greatly weakened your trading position by anchoring at a low number, even if you can push for a higher number. Still, there is some hope, although some of it depends on what you mean by "really could get." Have another offer from elsewhere for a much higher amount? It's okay. Did you just read somewhere that mean / median / common salary is X? That doesn't really mean much.

For many companies, what you mentioned has nothing to do with what they will offer you anyway. That question is to make sure they aren't wasting each other's time, but the pay will be what

Keep reading

You have greatly weakened your trading position by anchoring at a low number, even if you can push for a higher number. Still, there is some hope, although some of it depends on what you mean by "really could get." Have another offer from elsewhere for a much higher amount? It's okay. Did you just read somewhere that mean / median / common salary is X? That doesn't really mean much.

For many companies, what you mentioned has nothing to do with what they will offer you anyway. That question is to make sure they're not wasting each other's time, but the pay will be whatever (despite constant advice to the contrary, compensation is often bureaucratically determined and non-negotiable, though rarely / never hurts). attempt). The first interviewer may not even have a say in your salary, even if it's not set in stone, if you're just acting as a screen.

The most likely situation, if you even get an offer, is that they give you a specific offer. If it seems to be based on the initial estimate (again, it may not be), you'll want to come back with a counter offer. You will need to specify why it is worth more, based on your qualifications, your needs, and the market. You can also argue that you need more, based on circumstances that you were not initially aware of, such as the demands of the job or the cost of living in that area. If you have a backup plan, you have some leverage here. If you don't have any other offers, you can still negotiate, but be sure not to take the initial offer off the table, unless it is absolutely unacceptable.

If you are asked about compensation again in the second interview, you can try to reestablish the line using the same counteroffer tactics. However, keep in mind that you are in an interview and not in a negotiation. You are positioning yourself (hopefully as high value, reasonable cost), but they are unlikely to give you an indication if your new request is too high or low. If you're not even in the ballpark for what they're paying for, they'll likely eliminate you entirely, unless you have the skills they really need and can't get anywhere else. If it's reasonable, they probably don't care.

Good luck!

Understand how the company structures an offer:

  1. Your offer is based on previous level and salary.
  2. The level is mainly determined by your experience / resume / result of the interview.
  3. As long as your previous salary is below or within the band for this level, you will get the job


Now the strategy:

  1. Know the level you are trying to reach
  2. Know the range of the level
  3. Present your expectations at the higher end of the level.
  4. Skillful negotiation


Detail:

  1. Submitting your previous requirement / salary too high could lose the job offer as they think they cannot offer you at their level. Throwing too low will leave money on the table. Enough
Keep reading

Understand how the company structures an offer:

  1. Your offer is based on previous level and salary.
  2. The level is mainly determined by your experience / resume / result of the interview.
  3. As long as your previous salary is below or within the band for this level, you will get the job


Now the strategy:

  1. Know the level you are trying to reach
  2. Know the range of the level
  3. Present your expectations at the higher end of the level.
  4. Skillful negotiation


Detail:

  1. Submitting your previous requirement / salary too high could lose the job offer as they think they cannot offer you at their level. Throwing too low will leave money on the table. You need to do enough research in advance to pitch at the higher end of the level you can qualify for (see glassdoor.com). Also, if a company pays better in profit, it could be worse in salary, etc. Make sure you explain the total compensation and point out correctly, especially if you have a good benefit but a lower salary, you should probably start addressing your HIGHEST total compensation first and avoid giving your LOWEST salary.
  2. Negotiate by email, then insist on negotiating by phone. Stating obvious and also not obvious, like the old company, will give you a likely raise, even if it is 3% at the next review in a few months, while the new company probably won't.
  3. Avoid stating your final result too early (don't give a rank until you know a rank. Try to be a little slow to flood your target). If you know the maximum they will pay for you, you should let them know before they make the offer.
  4. Asking for more information can help, like a typical target bonus. Typical target MSW at your level. this will give you a better idea of ​​how good the pay really is.
  5. It helps to try a different strategy to see which one works. Some HR's are willing to compromise if you ask for a few thousand. Some are willing to a few thousand just if you ask for twenty thousand. Ask those who bargained or recent salary negotiation reviews to see how it will work.
  6. It's okay to hit the HR button for quicker response if you have another offer ready. HR is trained to prioritize those requests and ignore others. It's not okay to push without a solid reason to prioritize.


Questions, please send them to zhang24246@yahoo.com, I will help you. The typical salary negotiation consultant charges a few hundred dollars an hour, but it is definitely worth the money. The first two emails are free.

In any discussion of salary negotiations, there are two numbers:

  1. What you think you are worth. This is an imaginary number. Either you base it on extensive market research of people with your skills and experience, or something your friend's cousin's brother-in-law says he gets paid for similar work, or he just got this number off his butt. Whatever you came up with, you're probably wrong.
  2. What the company thinks you are worth. Unless you're some kind of special golden unicorn, that company already has a ton of people like you working there. What they are paying
Keep reading

In any discussion of salary negotiations, there are two numbers:

  1. What you think you are worth. This is an imaginary number. Either you base it on extensive market research of people with your skills and experience, or something your friend's cousin's brother-in-law says he gets paid for similar work, or he just got this number off his butt. Whatever you came up with, you're probably wrong.
  2. What the company thinks you are worth. Unless you're some kind of special golden unicorn, that company already has a ton of people like you working there. What they pay those people is what they think is probably going to be worth. Nothing more and nothing less.

Okay, while meeting them, he blurted out a number, based on the n. 1. Now you're thinking, “Shit! I think I can get more money out of these guys than that number I blurted out on them. How do I do that without looking like an idiot or completely missing the deal? "Sorry, no, it doesn't work like that.

Unless you've recently interviewed a very small company, they already have a salary number in mind based on their compensation structure. And that number will be somewhere below the midpoint of your salary range for that position. When they asked you what your salary expectations were, it was not to pin down a number, but to see if your expectations fit their salary structure. If you go back now and start asking for a number above that midpoint, chances are they will simply withdraw the offer and quickly forget about you.

The job market is not like a flea market, where the price of everything is negotiable. You are going to have to make a very simple decision. Accept their offer or decline it. If you think you are really worth more than what they offer, find another company that you think is worth more. Good luck!

Quora is fun sometimes because the questions are so short that we can read several different scenarios in the question.

Scenario 1: You are worth the expectation of your salary and more. You have been in the market and received offers that you declined for other reasons (perhaps a long commute or you were not offered your own office) at the expected level. And you really communicated very clearly to the right people what your level is. And some idiots in HR put the position at a salary level that you can't pay more than half and sent you the offer anyway hoping that because you're

Keep reading

Quora is fun sometimes because the questions are so short that we can read several different scenarios in the question.

Scenario 1: You are worth the expectation of your salary and more. You have been in the market and received offers that you declined for other reasons (perhaps a long commute or you were not offered your own office) at the expected level. And you really communicated very clearly to the right people what your level is. And some idiot in HR assigned the position to a salary level that he can't pay more than half and they sent you the offer anyway in the hope that, because you're a woman, they'll intimidate you into accepting it.

A: Bozos. It is not worth your time. Maybe just "maybe" is worth a personal call to the hiring manager to ask, "Did HR make you choose this salary? Because you know I'm worth what I asked for and if you could deliver, I might be interested, but If you really thought I was not going to burn this letter, you are insulting me. ”Actually, it is not a negotiation in the middle of what you ask for, it is a call of“ did you make a mistake? ”.

Scenario 2: You are a millennial with only 2 years of experience and you have 2 friends your age who earn twice as much as you, but you never have. You're barely qualified for the job you were interviewed for and it pays a certain level, but when they asked what you expected, you mentioned a number outside of your league because, hey, why not? And since he repeated it four times, he has convinced himself that jobs pay what they ask for, not what they can get for someone else. You haven't been interviewed or offered anything close to the listed price, so you have no idea if it's worth it.

A: Face reality. If you think this would be a good job for you, answer that you could make it work if you get 5% more than the offer and a review in 6 months with a probability of 5% above that if it excels and is worth it. (increase those values ​​to 10% if you want to be aggressive, but more than that, they will laugh at you)

If I understood correctly, you accepted the offer and have not yet joined the position. If this is true, then yes, you can negotiate, but you must have a solid reason. Otherwise, you would come out as someone who cannot be trusted. Some reasons / situations may be:

a) You have another offer with a superior package. Here time is important. If you were already waiting for this offer while accepting the previous one, it may still be defensible, otherwise it would appear that you were still trying your luck in the market even after accepting the offer. This begs the question: can you be trusted?

b) Your own current employer ga

Keep reading

If I understood correctly, you accepted the offer and have not yet joined the position. If this is true, then yes, you can negotiate, but you must have a solid reason. Otherwise, you would come out as someone who cannot be trusted. Some reasons / situations may be:

a) You have another offer with a superior package. Here time is important. If you were already waiting for this offer while accepting the previous one, it may still be defensible, otherwise it would appear that you were still trying your luck in the market even after accepting the offer. This begs the question: can you be trusted?

b) Your current employer gave or promised you a raise. Ideally, they won't unless you promise to keep a raise, so you should actually stick around instead of using that to negotiate. In fact, this reason is difficult to use to negotiate. The most likely situation could be that you tell the next employer that you are not joining, as the current company itself has given you a raise. If they are desperate to hire, they may try to lure you in by giving you a membership bonus or additional incentive to change your mind. But what if they don't?

c) There may be some genuine error in calculating your CTC and the cost of the switch. So you can highlight that and request your consideration. For example, I know of a case where someone had to pay a large amount of penalty (reimburse part of the relocation allowance awarded) but this person realized it only after accepting the offer and quitting the current company. When he highlighted this to the next employer, they agreed to add a union bonus to reduce the loss.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.