How can I have a successful interview?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Peter Mitchell



How can I have a successful interview?

  1. Your appearance. Dress for the job you want, and do your research, try to get a tour of the office where you will be interviewing, or at least stand outside the building and watch how people dress. Try to match that general look. Nobody wears a tie? So don't show up with a tie
  2. Do your research on the company, so when you answer "what brings you to company XYZ?" You have an answer that mentions some key points of your corporate history and your strategy and ongoing operations.
  3. If a question puzzles you, don't lie, ask a question related to the first question.
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  1. Your appearance. Dress for the job you want, and do your research, try to get a tour of the office where you will be interviewing, or at least stand outside the building and watch how people dress. Try to match that general look. Nobody wears a tie? So don't show up with a tie
  2. Do your research on the company, so when you answer "what brings you to company XYZ?" You have an answer that mentions some key points of your corporate history and your strategy and ongoing operations.
  3. If a question puzzles you, don't lie, ask a question related to the first question. "Are you familiar with Bessier steel processing systems?" - "How often does the knowledge of BSP systems arise as a nursery supervisor?"
  4. If you are being interviewed by a group, circulate your attention as you respond, try to make eye contact with each participant a couple of times per response.
  5. Avoid too short and too long answers. At best, a paragraph should answer any basic question; If you have more information than you could give, ask a closing question that invites further questions.
  6. if you can have a business card that you can hand out to each participant at the end.
  7. Send a thank you note for their time a day or two later, help keep your name in front of them, and show that you were sincere and didn't just attend all the interviews you could get.
  8. Even if they reject you, send a thank you note for their time and consideration (I actually got a job doing exactly that, the person they had hired retired and my thank you note and follow-ups indicated that I had the perseverance that I actually wanted to the position).
  9. keep calm during the interview, don't seem desperate, even if they like you enough to know how you are, it will probably affect what they offer for your salary if it seems like you need the money.
  10. Chasing the number 9 out of the interview, keep your hopes up and your outlook positive.

An interview, no matter how technical, is primarily about human interaction. It is important, therefore, that every step of the way, you communicate clearly with courtesy, honor. Here are the steps you need to take to ensure you have the best interview every time.

Before the interview:

Research the vision and culture of the organization you are interviewing for. Find out what resonates with you, your skills, and what you believe in.

Learn all you can about the position. The more informed you are, the more confident you are about discussing the position and how you might fit in.

Communicate tactfully

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An interview, no matter how technical, is primarily about human interaction. It is important, therefore, that every step of the way, you communicate clearly with courtesy, honor. Here are the steps you need to take to ensure you have the best interview every time.

Before the interview:

Research the vision and culture of the organization you are interviewing for. Find out what resonates with you, your skills, and what you believe in.

Learn all you can about the position. The more informed you are, the more confident you are about discussing the position and how you might fit in.

Communicate tactfully and professionally by email and phone. YOUR INTERVIEW STARTS HERE. The way you interact with them before the interview on the site already says a lot about who you are and if they want to work with you.

Confirm the date, place and time of your interview, at least a week in advance, to ensure that there are no misunderstandings in the details.

Print at least 10 copies of your resume on crisp, clean white paper. Keep them in a folder so they don't wrinkle or get dirty.

Dress in clothes that feel good and appropriate for the industry in which you work. If you are unsure, it is better to dress too much (suit and tie) than to dress poorly (pants and shirt) for the interview. When you arrive badly dressed, it gives the unwanted impression that you don't care about work and don't respect the people you meet.

During the Interview:

Before entering the building: TURN OFF YOUR PHONE.

Put ALL your focus and attention on meeting and greeting the people of this company. You don't want to be interrupted by any buzz while talking to someone. It is a distraction and a disgrace to the time and the people you are meeting with.

Walk your shoulders back, look up, smile, and speak clearly to everyone.

Kindly say hello to the receptionist. If you treat them with respect, they may share inside information that will help you in the interview.

Be courteous to EVERYONE you meet. Smile and greet those around you. You never know who is watching and what impression it is making on them. Make it positive.

Sit down and be ready in the office 15-30 minutes early so you're cool and ready. Sometimes there are unexpected delays or changes in interviewers' schedules, so be prepared to adjust.

Look around you and pay attention to the conversations taking place around you. You will learn valuable information about the company culture through these interactions.

When called to the interview, smile, look directly in the eyes, and shake hands firmly *. Look like you are happy to be there. Show that they are well prepared and invested in this meeting.

Believe that you are the best option for the team. Connect with interviewers by showing you understand their needs and how to meet them. The more they feel that you will add value to their results and at the same time be a good team player, the more they will be interested in you.

Don't start your responses with 'umm..uhhh'. It will seem insecure, small and insecure. Don't mumble your words. People will find you trustworthy and intelligent when you speak clearly and articulate.

Don't badmouth anyone ... especially your previous employer. It makes you look like a toxic and negative employee. If you can't say anything positive, don't say anything at all. If you are pressured about why you are leaving, say that you are looking for new opportunities to grow.

Ask questions that show your knowledge of the company and how you want to contribute to them.

At the end of the interview, thank everyone in the room and give them another firm, friendly handshake.

Also thank the receptionist. When you treat people with honor, it is very important that they stand up for you in ways you never imagined.

After the interview:

Turn your phone back on when you leave the building.

When you get home, write a thank you note or email the people who interviewed you. Address them with their appropriate name / title. If you introduced yourself during the interview as Mrs. Green, write "Dear Mrs. Green."

Expect to hear from them the moment they said they would contact you.

By following these strategies, you will find yourself enjoying the process more and getting much better results in your interviews.

We wish you great success with every step towards your new job!

* Please do what is appropriate for the culture you are in. If bowing and not making eye contact is the most respectful thing to do, do so. Follow what you know is socially correct for where you are in the world.

My biggest advice for interviews is to make it as much of a dialogue as possible. Most of the time, interviewers will have a list of pre-designed questions that they will ask each applicant, and many times, interviewees will have standard answers to those questions. They ask you a question, you explain what you would do, how you have done it before, and why you would do well at this job, and then you feel uncomfortable and stare at them as they take notes on your answer. . And it feels like an interview and all they're learning about you is your skills and everything they're getting.

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My biggest advice for interviews is to make it as much of a dialogue as possible. Most of the time, interviewers will have a list of pre-designed questions that they will ask each applicant, and many times, interviewees will have standard answers to those questions. They ask you a question, you explain what you would do, how you have done it before, and why you would do well at this job, and then you feel uncomfortable and watch them as they take notes on your answer. . And it feels like an interview and all they are learning about you is your skills and all they are getting is an in-depth look at your resume.

But companies also want to know who you are as a person, what you are like and if you would fit well into the personality of the team. When you have to work with the same group of people more than 5 days a week for more than 40 hours a week, it is important to be on a team with people that you like, or that you at least get along. You may have the best resume and most applicable skills, but if they have no idea who you are as a person, or think your personality would clash with the rest of the teams, you may not get the job. And it's almost impossible to see someone's personality when you're just spitting out an answer to a question and then sitting there. It is very stiff and uncomfortable for both parties.

So instead, treat the situation like a friend asking you questions about a job. Don't just spit out responses, start a real conversation. Ask them questions in return, laugh, smile, connect the answer to a story about yourself, add something a little personal, relax, show your personality and show that you are passionate about the job and what you do. Show them the person you would actually work with.

I just graduated in December and got my new job for special education specifically because they could see how passionate I was about education and because they thought I had a great personality and would fit in very well there. I will be working with a very small team of teachers, one of whom was one of my interviewers, so the fact that he liked him and knew he would be fun to work with was important. And in the end, they offered me the job before all my procedures were approved with Human Resources because they wanted to receive an offer before anyone else.

Being yourself and selling who you are, and not just your skills, is very important. Remember that you are not only giving them your knowledge and skills, you are also giving them to yourself, and they need to like you. Also, if you are creating a dialogue and opening up, they will too and you can see if you like their personality and if you would get along with them in a team setting. You may think the job is great until you find out that you can't stand the team and would actually be miserable there. But either way, be yourself and make the interview more relaxing and natural, and you'll be much more likely to walk away with a job offer.

I will assume this question is from the interviewer's point of view.

The resume and contacts made prior to the in-person interview should have determined the basic competency for the position, so the in-person interview is to determine competitive position (compared to all other interviewees) and fit cultural / business. The first few minutes can still be spent ensuring skill matching, because some people lie on resumes and get help answering emails. They may even have coaches for the phone review.

After establishing the actual setting, you need to get to know the person you are interviewing.

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I will assume this question is from the interviewer's point of view.

The resume and contacts made prior to the in-person interview should have determined the basic competency for the position, so the in-person interview is to determine competitive position (compared to all other interviewees) and fit cultural / business. The first few minutes can still be spent ensuring skill matching, because some people lie on resumes and get help answering emails. They may even have coaches for the phone review.

After establishing a real fit, you need to get to know the person you are interviewing. You will likely have to deal with this person for years to come, so you'll want to get to know them well enough to decide if you want to spend your work time with them. Participate in a conversation as you would with a new acquaintance in a social situation. Ask questions that reveal your attitude, personality, who you spend time with, and how you spend that time, both at work and outside of work. Look for mutual interests and discuss them thoroughly.

During these question-and-answer interactions, guide the conversation to areas that reveal what type of person you are dealing with. If this person will inform you, review their relationships with current and past bosses, and encourage the interviewee to do the same. If you're interviewing a colleague (or you're HR, interviewing for a position that you won't interact with on a daily basis), discuss the group settings you engage in on a daily basis and encourage the same from the interviewee.

Make sure you remember that you are selling the position as much as you are interviewing someone to fill it. At all times, act as if you are going to hire this person and work with them on a daily basis. If after the interview you decide that this is not the person you want to hire, you have not lost anything. If you are cold to cold during the initial part of the interview and decide later in the interview that this is likely to be your candidate of choice, you may have lost the interviewee because of their attitude and your offer will be rejected.

Don't spend more time talking than listening. Give the interviewee plenty of opportunities to say something stupid. Don't pounce just because you make a verbal mistake, but watch the patterns and make sure you don't have a misfit for your personality and / or corporate culture. If you are unfamiliar with your company culture, think about how well this person will fit in with “the gang” in social situations. The person who would perform better in the specific position is a poor hire if it ruins the overall dynamics of the group or company.

Lastly, make sure that several people interview the person and have a conversation with them immediately after the interviews are over. Check the answers for consistency. If the interviewee is answering what they have determined the interviewer wants to hear and the responses are not consistent across the interviews, disconnect them. This does not mean that all answers to all people should be the same, but it does mean that they should not be contradictory. You definitely don't want to hire someone to tell everyone what they want to hear, regardless of whether the person is consistent over time.

Always remember that you are not only hiring someone to do a job for you, but you are hiring someone with whom you will spend up to 8 hours a day, 5 or more days a week.

You can google it and you will get a better answer than I can present. So I'll try to present some hidden insights from the interview that you may not get anywhere. I have given 4 interviews in which 3 were successful.

The interview is like a game played on a field, it can be assumed as a basketball court in which there are only two players, you and the interviewer, the game is in your hand when you have basketball with you.

What I mean is that the interview is an active process in which the proper participation of both participants must be involved in order for it to be successful. I

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You can google it and you will get a better answer than I can present. So I'll try to present some hidden insights from the interview that you may not get anywhere. I have given 4 interviews in which 3 were successful.

The interview is like a game played on a field, it can be assumed as a basketball court in which there are only two players, you and the interviewer, the game is in your hand when you have basketball with you.

What I mean is that the interview is an active process in which the proper participation of both participants must be involved in order for it to be successful. It's not that the interview is a one-sided game, you can pull the results in your favor. How can you do it? Let's see, the content of the curriculum plays a vital role. The content covers your achievements, qualities, skills, experience and projects. As a new or secondary employee, I think projects play an important role. You must have few projects mentioned in your resume, you must have a deep knowledge of these projects, if possible they should be live. And it should be properly highlighted on the resume. Now see what happens, when the interviewer looks at your resume, there is a 70 percent chance that they will get involved with you on projects. This is what I wanted to tell you. You notice that the interview is now diverted towards you and if you have prepared properly, the game is in your hand. Few things need to be kept in mind when explaining the project, communicating well, and maintaining body language.

This was one of the perspectives on how Interview could turn in his favor. The next thing I have observed to win this game is… the qualities you mention on your resume must have a story attached to it. It is very common that you come across questioning about what you have said in the curriculum, you must defend yourself with an adequate and authentic story. This was the second way to score more points in this running game.

The last thing I want to mention is that you should please mention some skill that the job demands and again I would say be prepared for stories and tests that will judge whether you really have those skills or not.

I have not said about his academic achievements or co-curricular activities. Please mention those. One thing to keep in mind is that if you have a good academic career one day or another it will give you the result, try to maintain a good academic career as well.

Maintain eye contact, strategically handle tough HR questions, stay calm and enthusiastic, maintain good body language, and be attired. All the best, you will definitely get the job.

Make sure to be mindful and not to get provoked / instigated or carried away in self-talk so much that we tend to forget that we are enacting a professional aspect of ourselves that is not drama or performance - meaning brings seriousness to that degree of not. just rushing to answer; not just keep scratching our foreheads or keep rubbing our hands or fondling our knuckles or sitting with one thigh on the other.

Remember to sit up straight and confidently look the interviewer in the face as you might be while conducting the interview, observing the expression

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Make sure to be mindful and not to get provoked / instigated or carried away in self-talk so much that we tend to forget that we are enacting a professional aspect of ourselves that is not drama or performance - meaning brings seriousness to that degree of not. just rushing to answer; not just keep scratching our foreheads or keep rubbing our hands or fondling our knuckles or sitting with one thigh on the other.

Remember to sit up straight and confidently look the interviewer in the face as it might actually be while conducting the interview, looking at the expression on our faces with the look in our eyes; Since sometimes when we tend to just do a fairy tale trick or do a quick one, are our eyes and facial expressions representing a kind of whole perspective?

The point is to be smart and balanced and not add too much or take too much; be fair and honest and don't just keep talking disrespectfully or rush to interrupt or talk too much about what's essential / relevant; be precise / present succinctly and precisely the answer to what is requested as if each and every word represented a million dollars +

Which means that the intrinsic value of some aspects of our lives is far beyond any comparison and how well we behave is not enough; make sure that the care that your true nature craves in your presentations / communications and not at all is true. that you are ever being / fulfilling …….

Before heading to the interview, remember to keep reviewing the handwritten notes for important insightful tips / guidelines and feel good about yourself and all of life ………

Job interviews can be lengthy and tedious, not to mention stressful, as it is up to candidate to candidate how they appear. We have all been there sweating and speculating. However, occasionally, a humble checklist can ease our anxiety. Here are some interview tips to keep in mind before each interview. If you can accomplish most of them, then you should be calm when entering the interview room.

Researching the industry and the company is the first step before getting the job done. An interviewer may ask you how you distinguish your company's position in your industry,

Keep reading

Job interviews can be lengthy and tedious, not to mention stressful, as it is up to candidate to candidate how they appear. We have all been there sweating and speculating. However, occasionally, a humble checklist can ease our anxiety. Here are some interview tips to keep in mind before each interview. If you can accomplish most of them, then you should be calm when entering the interview room.

Researching the industry and the company is the first step before getting the job done. An interviewer may ask you how you distinguish your company's position in your industry, who the company's competitors are, what its viable advantages are, and what is the best way forward. For this reason, avoid trying to systematically research a bunch of diverse industries. Instead, focus your job search on just a few industries.

Some important points before showing up for the job interview:

=> Know how hungry you are. People who are clear about their interests, desires, and desires are much more jealous of them and their fit is more obvious.

=> Distinguish what you are good at. Not essentially what you WANT to be straight at, or what you THINK you're good at. What you are really and really good at.

=> Identify what you don't need based on your priorities. You don't have to let the interviewer identify this, but it will become vital once you receive the offer and can help you mark a good choice. What is a deciding factor for you?

=> Think about the future prospects. Where will this job take you? Where are you hungry to go? People with goals and dreams are people who will acquire and grow.

=> Be yourself and don't brag. Yes, you are selling yourself in an interview, but sell how trustworthy you are. You are likely to receive an offer with a job that is noble if you are yourself in the interview.

=> Review your resume and update it appropriately with facts and figures. Don't exaggerate yourself or your experiences on the resume. Keep it authentic and true, and be prepared to define the "why" behind each of your accomplishments.

=> Own your experience and express it delicately. I have seen more candidates receive negative reviews because they defined their events in terms of "us". It doesn't make sense, of course, but it happens. Tell us what you did and how you owned it.

=> Find out about the company and the valuable service they offer. Learn what they do and be smart as you talk about why that will wake you up every morning and why it will drive you to stay a little late, every night.

=> Be clear about your value. Have a minimum wage that you would receive for a perfect job. Yes, you are essential to paying your bills, but you also admit that there is much, much more to the job than JUST the paycheck. Once you get the job, you can PROVE your worth.

=> Don't be too happy. You are talking to someone for the first time and it is a prerequisite to making a good impression. Be polite, well-groomed, and use decent, clear language to communicate.

=> If you don't identify the answer, say so. And then tell us how you would find the answer.

=> Always be positive and curious to hire someone so it will be equally positive. Nothing kills an interview faster than brutal and frank honesty in a damaging way. Job stalking is difficult and annoying, don't let it show.

=> Bring three copies of your resume so multiple interviewers can review it. You'd be surprised how various hiring managers will mistreat you for this petty little oversight. It doesn't make sense, don't give them that excuse.

=> Follow up with a thank you email. Be quick, concise, and explain why you love their company and why you fit in. Briefly.

=> Interview as often as you can. Like everyone, practice profit. If you can get high doing phone interviews or remote interviews, go ahead and be serious as you listen back to your responses.

=> Have a little fun, it doesn't all have to be sales, self-promotion, and annoying manners. People are hiring people, after all, and they're hungry to acknowledge that you have a (appropriate) sense of humor and that you can sympathize and empathize with them.

I'm going to bullet these:

  1. do your homework, research the company, make sure you can actually work for them; do you agree with what they do? If you haven't heard of the company, I can't hurt to see how they're doing, otherwise a surprise dismissal from an earl could be your future.
  2. Research the role, what are the general expectations (just because you have a version of what the role implies doesn't mean there is the same).
  3. read and know your CV inside and out, there is nothing worse than an interviewee who puts something on their CV and then seems surprised when you mention it in the interview.
  4. continue
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I'm going to bullet these:

  1. do your homework, research the company, make sure you can actually work for them; do you agree with what they do? If you haven't heard of the company, I can't hurt to see how they're doing, otherwise a surprise dismissal from an earl could be your future.
  2. Research the role, what are the general expectations (just because you have a version of what the role implies doesn't mean there is the same).
  3. read and know your CV inside and out, there is nothing worse than an interviewee who puts something on their CV and then seems surprised when you mention it in the interview.
  4. Go on from 3, but what you put on your resume is fair game, make sure you are as competent as you say or you are going to make a fool of yourself.
  5. It's okay to say you don't know the answer to a question, but it's not okay to talk nonsense
  6. Be precise, answer the questions concisely as you can answer thoroughly.
  7. An interviewer should have no problem letting you use a whiteboard or other demo tools (since this depends a lot on the job you're looking for), so if they're in the room, don't be afraid to ask.
  8. If you are lying and you get the job, ask if you really want that job, keep in mind that you just misled your interviewers. So can they do their job?
  9. Don't start the conversation about pay or benefits, if they do, then that's up to you.
  10. The interview is as much about them finding out if you are suitable for the job as it is about you finding out if the company is right for you, asking questions.
  11. at least in England there are strict laws about what an interviewer can ask you; Age (some exceptions), sexual orientation, family life, plans for children, and many more topics are a big no, if you find an interviewer who hits these topics, then you probably want to avoid taking the job, if you really want the job. work, then my advice would be not to answer those questions.
  12. Everyone has different circumstances, but if you are looking for a position and looking to move up, try to find out what kind of job this is; a career or just a job.

TOP 10 SECRETS TO WIN EVERY JOB INTERVIEWS!

I hope you enjoy.

1. Confident:

The best advice we can offer is to be confident and remember that you have come this far on purpose. Keep your head up, don't trip, and remember, 'you've got this.' Interviews are one of the few times in life when narcissism is recognized and possibly accepted. Keep in mind that there is a barely recognizable difference between confidence and pomposity, however during the interview process you need a nice balance of both. Side note: If you are normally selfish, then discard my past explanations.

Keep reading

TOP 10 SECRETS TO WIN EVERY JOB INTERVIEWS!

I hope you enjoy.

1. Confident:

The best advice we can offer is to be confident and remember that you have come this far on purpose. Keep your head up, don't trip, and remember, 'you've got this.' Interviews are one of the few times in life when narcissism is recognized and possibly accepted. Keep in mind that there is a barely recognizable difference between confidence and pomposity, however during the interview process you need a nice balance of both. Side note: If you are normally selfish, then discard my previous explanation: for you I say, smile and sit down, you are not all of that!

2. Do your homework

Difficult questions are likely to be asked during the interview. Setting the summary of possible questions in advance will help you effortlessly switch from one question to another. Spend time researching the organization. Visit their site to understand their mission statement, product offerings, and management team. A couple of hours examining before the interview can make a huge impression on the hiring manager. Read the organization's annual report (frequently published on the site), review the employee's LinkedIn profiles, and search Google News for the organization to see if they have been referenced in the media lately. The more you think about an organization, the more you will know how you will fit into it.

3. Ask questions

Try not to walk out of the interview without ensuring that you realize everything you need to think about the position. When the interview is over, your chance to get answers to vital questions is over. Asking questions can also show that you are interested in the job. Be explicit with your questions. Get information about the company and the industry. Refrain from asking individual questions of the interviewer and refrain from asking questions related to politics, religion, etc.

Related Post: frree ebook 395 interview questions with answers

4. First impressions

When we first meet someone, we momentarily take into consideration different parts of their identity. Prepare and plan for that first impression long before you walk in the door. Carry on that amazing impression for days to come, and that job could be yours.

After:

• Never be late.

• Use positive non-verbal communication and activate your ideal attractiveness from the beginning.

• Turn off your mobile before entering the room.

• Looks fabulous; Dress well and make sure you do your best.

• Begin the interview with a handshake; Give a nice firm pressure and then an up and down motion.

• Decide to develop a suitable interviewer affinity early on.

• Reliably let the interviewer finish speaking before giving feedback.

• Express yourself fluently, clearly and accurately.

5. Tell your story

You must sell your product, which is yourself, to get the job. Be prepared to explain to the interviewer why they should hire you. Some interviewers may not directly ask you to clarify why you are the most ideal candidate for the position. Regardless of whether you are asked, be sure to include an answer during the discussion. Be confident and brief in clarifying why you trust that you should be hired and that you will do the best job possible. Incorporate your qualifications into your sales pitch.

6. Explain how you can help the company.

The job interview is not an ideal opportunity to tell the story of your life; you are there to show that you can add value to the organization. Keep in mind that the interview is not really about you, it is about the organization and how you will approach a hiring manager's problem of filling the position with a qualified person, quickly, so be sure to discuss how you can apply. what you want to know about your organization ",

7. Prepare to learn

As hinted above, you must be reliably prepared to learn during an interview. Jeannie Kahwajy, an expert in organizational behavior, conducted research showing that candidates who are willing to learn can change negative interviews. Jeannie conducted experiments that included mock interviews. A recruiter was prepared to have a negative bias towards a candidate. Of the three candidate groups, one was told to show that they should get the job; one was advised to benefit from the interaction; and the final group, the control, did not receive explicit instructions. It found that the recruiter's negative bias was strengthened for the control group and the group that struggled to show they should get the job.

8. Technical knowledge doesn't matter; it's about personality

When you go to an interview, you should know that your knowledge is not being tested. The interviewer is more interested in your personality, how you behave and handle situations. They want to be sure that you will fit in with others, if you can be trusted.

Therefore:

When you speak, be confident and be sure to back up your answer with examples from past work experiences.

· Be positive and always have a good attitude, let them know that you enjoy what you do and that you are ambitious and enthusiastic for new challenges.

· Do not show personal conflicts with your employers and do not be rude.

· Show that you can be professional, so don't get too relaxed.

· Don't be dishonest, but present the truth in a way that shows a positive side that suits the job.

9. Do-it-yourself interview practice

There are several approaches to planning an interview at home without the help of a professional professional counselor or coach or a paid service. You can practice interviews without anyone else or select loved ones to help you.

10. Follow up and send a thank you note.

Following up after an interview can allow you to establish a long-term connection and differentiate yourself from the group. Philip Farina, CPP, Security Career Expert at Manta Security Management Recruiters, says: “Please send an email and also a printed thank you note, communicating enthusiasm, qualifications and more excitement for the position. Invite the hiring manager to contact you for additional information. Also, it's a good time to send a key follow-up letter of interest. "

How to break an interview?

Be yourself and trust! (The most important)

Perform SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat) analysis of the organization. It will clear up most of your doubts and have enough content to answer any questions you may have on doomsday.

Think, write, formulate and then compile all your qualities and achievements. It may seem silly, but try to find out more about yourself. This is important as you may not know what its value is until you find out for yourself.

Now match the job requirements with the skills you have collected and understood.

Keep reading

How to break an interview?

Be yourself and trust! (The most important)

Perform SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat) analysis of the organization. It will clear up most of your doubts and have enough content to answer any questions you may have on doomsday.

Think, write, formulate and then compile all your qualities and achievements. It may seem silly, but try to find out more about yourself. This is important as you may not know what its value is until you find out for yourself.

Now match the job requirements with the skills you have collected and understand why you are going to be a valuable asset to them. Because if you understand it, only you can convince others.

You can do this by noting the contests you've won, the internships you've done, the project you've worked on, or even the smallest thing worth counting to show your caliber.

If you are having trouble speaking in front of others, practice speaking in front of the laptop screen while keeping your webcam on or in front of the mirror. Trust me, it helps a lot.

Record your mock interview and watch for mistakes.

Know all about the points you have mentioned on your resume as it is considered your plan.

Before entering the interview room, take a deep breath for a minute and then a glass of water continue.

The ability to listen is one of the best things you can have in your personality. During your interview, listen carefully and then just answer them. Most of the time, our heart begins to beat so fast that it petrifies us and begins to give answers that are not meant to be.

Be precise when speaking. Listen, take a moment to think, and then respond accordingly.

If you don't know, don't make up anything, just say you don't know and move on.

Be yourself and ask the question if you have a chance about the role or something interesting that comes to mind while doing the SWOT analyzes.

Shaking hands also makes a great impression. (Avoid during COVID situation)

Communication skills

Some candidates think this is language ability. Sorry to disappoint, but communication is not always about language. It's not about your American accent or Shakespeare's English. Of course, you need the basic ability to speak English, but nothing more. The three key elements of good communication are

  • Listen - Actively listen to what the interviewer asks. DO NOT interrupt the question or answer before the question is complete.
    • Absorb: understand the meaning and context of the question. If not, feel free to ask. Remember, no question is stupid.
      • Tip: some candidat
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Communication skills

Some candidates think this is language ability. Sorry to disappoint, but communication is not always about language. It's not about your American accent or Shakespeare's English. Of course, you need the basic ability to speak English, but nothing more. The three key elements of good communication are

  • Listen - Actively listen to what the interviewer asks. DO NOT interrupt the question or answer before the question is complete.
    • Absorb: understand the meaning and context of the question. If not, feel free to ask. Remember, no question is stupid.
      • Tip: some candidates, who are not comfortable asking "Can you repeat?" or "Can you elaborate?", you can do this in an alternative way. Explain the question to the interviewer as they understand it and get confirmation. For example, Q: "What are your outside interests?" You: "So you ask me about any of my hobbies and interests other than academic ... right?"
    • Answer Clearly and Loudly - Once you get the question, answer in clear, short, direct words, and of course, out loud. Mumbling under your breath is often frustrating for the interviewer.

Confidence

It’s pretty common for a freshers to get intimidated by the environment and the interviewers and to feel lot of nerves. But hey RELAX! Understand the fact that the company wants you as much as you need them. They called you in for HR round, because they want to select you, not reject you. So just be yourself, like you would be at your home or college playing with your friends. Few things what shows confidence are

  • Sit straight and keep a comfortable posture. Do not lean or sit on edge of the seat, nor lean back too much.
    • Keep eye contact. Don’t look into oblivion (read ceiling, curtains etc.), while answering.
    • Keep a pleasant and smiling expression and show an interest in the proceedings.
    • Answer with simple, clear words and loud enough for the interviewer to hear.
    • It’s okay to say “Don’t know”. That shows your comfort in accepting things you don’t know about.
      • Note: Don’t overdo “Don’t know” stuff. That might turn against you.

Compatibility with the company

Each company has a different working culture. When a company evaluates a candidate, one major quality they will look for is how compatible you are with their working culture. Although you get information online on major corporates, preparing for this becomes slightly tricky for lesser known companies. So getting prepared for this part is not 100% feasible, but here are few things you can do, to avoid failing this.

  • Show flexibility – HRs see a freshers as a fresh clay, which could be molded to suit the company environment. Show them you are that, rather than a hard seasoned pot. Keep your options open, like working hours, location etc. unless absolute necessary. Understand that, it is important to kick start your career, rather than looking for comforts.
    • Stay neutral – Do not overreact or speak out extreme suggestions about any general topic, for which your opinion is asked for. They might be trying to evaluate you against one of their company policy.
      • Example: “What is your opinion on gay rights?” Don’t answer with a condescended tone or be disrespectful. Just answer neutral something like “Everyone should have the right to make choices based on personal preferences, which should go in line with the legality of the country”.
    • Stay legal/ moral – All company policies are based on legal code of the country and moral values. Understand this and while answering, stick on these lines. If question is “What will you do if you see a female colleague being harassed by your friend?” Your answer should be “I will report it to the manager.” An illegal conduct has zero tolerance in any corporate culture.

Learnability

The USP of a fresher to any company is the flexibility in utilizing his/her ability within its different operations - This could be for an expansion plan, an existing delivery process, for a product development team. This is only effective, only if the learning ability of a candidate is strong and steep enough - that is efficient and quick. The learning could be of a new technology, a new culture, a new life style.

  • Your academic graphs is one of the important indicators for this (& hence the cut offs). But that’s just one aspects and remember, you already cleared that hurdle.
    • This is mostly evaluated by few indirect questions – like asking about your experience with team work, any challenges you faced, project works, other trainings (academics / non-academics) you did outside regular schooling.
    • It will be prudent to have at least one example which will showcase you are willing and efficient in learning new stuffs.

Salary

Of course you know this – the compensation. A fresher doesn’t hold much bargaining power. But nevertheless, this is a common question asked during the interview. “What is your expected CTC?” Learn about the fresher’s package of the company & try to stay within the limits. All that a HR is trying to look here is, are you really interested in a company like theirs. So when a mid level company usually offers a package of 3-4 L for a fresher, and your answer is 10L, then it says you are looking for a top level company.

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