How can I get a job on Facebook or Google within 3 months in 2019?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Sarah Brown



How can I get a job on Facebook or Google within 3 months in 2019?

Prove your ability to search online on how to apply and prepare for an interview. There are many questions (and answers) like this on Quora and online.

TL; DR: Java.

Having interned at Amazon and currently at Microsoft, I can give a little insight into the languages ​​you can learn to start an exciting career as a software engineer (excuse me if you are looking for advice on how to be a data scientist or other kind of engineer )! :)

Java is the main development language at Amazon, but there are some teams that use Python, C, C ++, Ruby, etc. If you are new to programming, it can be a challenge to learn Java, but Amazon tends to let you only choose between Java, C, and C ++ for their interviews, so I would recommend learning Java if you specify

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TL; DR: Java.

Having interned at Amazon and currently at Microsoft, I can give a little insight into the languages ​​you can learn to start an exciting career as a software engineer (excuse me if you are looking for advice on how to be a data scientist or other kind of engineer )! :)

Java is the main development language at Amazon, but there are some teams that use Python, C, C ++, Ruby, etc. If you're new to programming, it can be a challenge to learn Java, but Amazon tends to let you only choose between Java, C, and C ++ for their interviews, so I would recommend learning Java if you specifically want to work at Amazon.

At Microsoft, the languages ​​used are somewhat varied, but C # is what you will probably use as a software engineer there. C # is very similar in syntax to Java, so learning one will make the other easier to learn. When I interviewed with Microsoft, I used Java, but I heard from people who used other languages ​​like C ++ and Python with no problem. However, to be better prepared for the job, C # / Java are good choices if you will be working primarily on the back end.

For Google / Facebook, I have seen friends who have interviewed on Python and Java, but use a variety of languages ​​in their work, such as Hack (dialect of PHP according to interwebs), Java, some Javascript framework, etc. But don't worry, you DO NOT have to learn all those languages ​​to be successful, you can learn them on the job.

In my opinion, Python would be the easiest language to start learning because it has very low overhead. However, the industry leans more towards static typing languages ​​(where the type of a variable is defined as $$ int x = 4; $$ instead of $$ x = 4; $$). This makes sense because as you build your product or service, you need to know exactly what types of input and output you'll be dealing with, and a host of other things. Java also has a lot of documentation and is widely used in the industry, not just the companies mentioned. Knowing Java will also help you get other jobs.

Good luck, and even if you don't work at the companies you mentioned, you will definitely find the journey to being a software engineer enjoyable! : D

Simple.

You open their career page, apply, get interviewed, and get a job.

The question is, how are the application and interviews approved?

First of all, I am assuming your bachelor's degree is not related to computer science as well, and your master's degree doesn't teach you computer science either.

I'll be frank, your chances are low, maybe less than a recent CS graduate. But it is not zero, it is still possible!

Before continuing on how to increase your chances, I first want you to answer these questions in your mind.

Why CS work?

You have studied a non-computing area for at least 6 years (undergraduate + master's degree). Do you like it ? Do me

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Simple.

You open their career page, apply, get interviewed, and get a job.

The question is, how are the application and interviews approved?

First of all, I am assuming your bachelor's degree is not related to computer science as well, and your master's degree doesn't teach you computer science either.

I'll be frank, your chances are low, maybe less than a recent CS graduate. But it is not zero, it is still possible!

Before continuing on how to increase your chances, I first want you to answer these questions in your mind.

Why CS work?

You have studied a non-computing area for at least 6 years (undergraduate + master's degree). Do you like it ? Like? Are you doing it for a higher median salary?

Why should it be a great tech company?

You mentioned that you have a history of weak cs. As an analogy, were you going to work as a 100m marathon runner when you first started learning to walk?

As long as you are convinced to continue this journey (based on your motives). This is how you increase your chances:

Start small, grow!

  1. Learn and master the basics of CS very well, master various programming languages ​​such as C ++, be good at data structures and algorithms
  2. Build real projects on your own, learn to use your programming skills! Upload it on github to show people. This can make the recruiter notice.
  3. If big companies reject you, get a job in smaller companies first. This is better than having no beginning. Keep asking why for everything, optimize your learning experiences
  4. In time, you will know how to get the job after you've been working and programming for a while.

Lastly, be yourself ...

Yes, quite difficult. I applied for a job as a developer there earlier this year. I have ten years of experience in the software industry and a first-class honors graduate degree from one of the best universities in my country. I initially made a selection with their internal recruiter, which was only to confirm my interest and the details of the position and how it matched my experience. I carefully reviewed the algorithms throughout the process, which took around six weeks after the recruiter's call and consisted, first of all, of an hour-long interview and a coding test with the hiring manager. That

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Yes, quite difficult. I applied for a job as a developer there earlier this year. I have ten years of experience in the software industry and a first-class honors graduate degree from one of the best universities in my country. I initially made a selection with their internal recruiter, which was only to confirm my interest and the details of the position and how it matched my experience. I carefully reviewed the algorithms throughout the process, which took around six weeks after the recruiter's call and consisted, first of all, of an hour-long interview and a coding test with the hiring manager. That was difficult and I thought I hadn't done well enough, but I got the call the following week to attend the on-site event. I did that and it was about three hours of face-to-face interviews that included not one, but two coding tests. I evidently did not meet their high standard and was informed the following week that I was unsuccessful. Maybe with more time / concentration I could have been successful, but they didn't provide me with feedback, so I really don't know how far I was from the hiring bar.

Thanks for the A2A!

I think it's less about knowing a certain number of programming languages ​​and more about knowing which ones to choose for specific purposes. Computer programming languages ​​are like tools in a toolbox. Some of them are better suited for certain tasks than others. So by knowing various languages ​​that are used for different purposes, you have more tools to choose from and that makes you a better programmer.

Regarding your question, I would say that knowing a dynamically written language, like Python, as well as a statically written language, like C ++, would help.

Python is used for qui

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Thanks for the A2A!

I think it's less about knowing a certain number of programming languages ​​and more about knowing which ones to choose for specific purposes. Computer programming languages ​​are like tools in a toolbox. Some of them are better suited for certain tasks than others. So by knowing various languages ​​that are used for different purposes, you have more tools to choose from and that makes you a better programmer.

Regarding your question, I would say that knowing a dynamically written language, like Python, as well as a statically written language, like C ++, would help.

Python is used for quick experimentation and even for many client-side applications that don't have to be very powerful. Also, you can use Python in interviews to code faster because it has far fewer configuration steps to do (for example, you don't need to declare variables or types in method signatures, allowing you to focus more on algorithm design).

C ++ is a main programming language that is used in many companies for backend code that must be efficient and secure. It is a compiled language that requires you to be precise about types. So it may be more pedantic and detailed than working with Python, but it is an important language that you need to know. In addition, it has a well-known template set called the Standard Template Library, which contains data structures and even algorithms, such as for sorting and hashing.

With just Python and C ++, you can create some really cool applications. But you shouldn't stop there. Always learn about new languages ​​and paradigms so you can add more to your toolbox.

Happy coding!

I am not a technician with a classical liberal arts background (psychology and philosophy) and have been working at Google full time for ~ 4 years.

Before going full time, I got 2 Google contract positions with Google Search and Zagat, both non-technical.

It is definitely possible ... I focused my job application and search energy on soft skills oriented roles such as marketing, advertising and support operations, account management, strategist and the like.

For companies like Google, Facebook, and the like, even non-technical roles can involve basic technical skills and knowledge.

You will probably achieve those

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I am not a technician with a classical liberal arts background (psychology and philosophy) and have been working at Google full time for ~ 4 years.

Before going full time, I got 2 Google contract positions with Google Search and Zagat, both non-technical.

It is definitely possible ... I focused my job application and search energy on soft skills oriented roles such as marketing, advertising and support operations, account management, strategist and the like.

For companies like Google, Facebook, and the like, even non-technical roles can involve basic technical skills and knowledge.

You'll likely achieve those kinds of skills on the job, but if you're trying to get into a tech-oriented company, it really helps to show that you've taken the time to learn basic technical concepts and have something to show for yourself. for this, like some courses completely from Codecademy or Lynda.

The thoughts / opinions are my own.

Go back to 2015 and start your road to being hired in 2019. Find out what top skill you want to bring to the table, and assuming it's a skill Google needs, sign up for a degree that shows you have the skill. As you study, keep in mind that you have to do better than your peers, who will largely NOT be gaining the relevant skills, but will rather be partying and crowded to PRETEND that you have learned something long enough to earn a passing grade. You will have to really learn these things, because Google will test it (if not during the interview

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Go back to 2015 and start your road to being hired in 2019. Find out what top skill you want to bring to the table, and assuming it's a skill Google needs, sign up for a degree that shows you have the skill. As you study, keep in mind that you have to do better than your peers, who will largely NOT be acquiring the relevant skills, but will rather be partying and crowding to PRETEND that you have learned something long enough to earn a passing grade. You will have to be learning these things, because Google will put you to the test (if not during the interview process, at the time of the first performance review it will be very clear if you skated in school or not).

Alternatively, there are ways to show you have skills that don't require college (serious contributions to open source projects, maybe even apprenticeships if you live in a place where that's a realistic option). Again, you need to acquire the skill in question. A piece of paper that represents "maybe you got this, maybe you cheated on us" will not work on its own.

Certainly. People don't usually talk about their degrees on Google, but I've deduced that at least 3 people on my team came from a non-traditional education. In general, a person may be equally qualified and able to perform software engineering work without a degree, and in some cases, more qualified. Google is fully aware of this fact. I also tend to believe that if you were someone who learned the skills necessary to be an engineer on your own, you might have an incredible amount of personal drive and motivation. Have the structure of a university to guide and motivate you

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Certainly. People don't usually talk about their degrees on Google, but I've deduced that at least 3 people on my team came from a non-traditional education. In general, a person may be equally qualified and able to perform software engineering work without a degree, and in some cases, more qualified. Google is fully aware of this fact. I also tend to believe that if you were someone who learned the skills necessary to be an engineer on your own, you might have an incredible amount of personal drive and motivation. Having the structure of a university to guide and motivate you through that learning makes it much easier. So in that sense,

Companies like Google and FB are tech eccentrics and most of the jobs are in the tech area. However, not all jobs require technical or coding skills. I did a simple job search on Google and found the following for FB

  • Manager of Public Policies (Economic Regulations) - India and SA Company name Facebook Company location India and SA
  • Business Leader, India Company Name Facebook Company Location India
  • Director, Business Program Management Company Name Facebook Company Location Menlo Park, CA, USA

And for google

  • Technical Writer, Software Engineering Company Name Google Company Location San Franc
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Companies like Google and FB are tech eccentrics and most of the jobs are in the tech area. However, not all jobs require technical or coding skills. I did a simple job search on Google and found the following for FB

  • Manager of Public Policies (Economic Regulations) - India and SA Company name Facebook Company location India and SA
  • Business Leader, India Company Name Facebook Company Location India
  • Director, Business Program Management Company Name Facebook Company Location Menlo Park, CA, USA

And for google

  • Technical Writer, Software Engineering Company Name Google Company Location San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Policy and Privacy Officer, Marketing Operations Company Name Google Company Location Mountain View, CA, USA
  • Project Executive, Real Estate Company Name Google Business Location Bangalore, IN

As a 'non-coder', you need some functional specialization that is useful to the companies in question.

For Google, I would say distributed computing, algorithms, data structures, software engineering, Java, C ++, Go, and Python.

I don't personally know Facebook's tech foundation, but looking at Software Engineer's job descriptions on their Careers page, I see Javascript, C ++, C, Java, MySQL, PHP, Python, Hadoop, MapReduce, OpenGL, Android .

I started on Facebook in September and I don't have a college degree, so yes. You just have to be able to convince them of your "superior coding and programming skills."

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