How can I get a job in Japan through any site or company?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Derek Stark



How can I get a job in Japan through any site or company?

I recommend using the following websites:

  • Gaijinpot
  • LinkedIn
  • Monster Jobs

I have received a lot of recruitment emails through these sites because my resume said that I spoke and wrote some Japanese. I never got a job in Japan through these sites, but I imagine it is a way to find and submit your resume.

I also heard about job fairs for large Japanese companies in the United States. You can also be recruited there. I only heard of one in Boston.

I would also recommend passing the JLPT (levels 1-5) so that you can earn a certification and put it on your resume. Surely that will help to achieve something.

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I recommend using the following websites:

  • Gaijinpot
  • LinkedIn
  • Monster Jobs

I have received a lot of recruitment emails through these sites because my resume said that I spoke and wrote some Japanese. I never got a job in Japan through these sites, but I imagine it is a way to find and submit your resume.

I also heard about job fairs for large Japanese companies in the United States. You can also be recruited there. I only heard of one in Boston.

I would also recommend passing the JLPT (levels 1-5) so that you can earn a certification and put it on your resume. That will surely help draw attention to your resume.

JLPT Japanese Language Proficiency Test

Personally, I recommended Robert Walters, I was introduced to the place I am working at right now.

In addition to staff checking and monitoring how you are doing in the workplace, they give you tips to improve your career.

They take your skills and what you want to do into account and sometimes even recommend a change of direction if they think it would be better for you to brush up on certain skills in a different workplace.

All in all, they are the company I trust the most for professional support.

Apply to any company that you think can use your skills and has international operations. Of course, Japanese is worth knowing. The number of foreigners in Japan with excellent Japanese skills is now very high.
Of course, you can always teach English while learning the language.

Yes it is, especially for experienced professionals.

I worked in two companies that did not require Japanese skills at all, at least in many departments. One in the automotive industry, Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), and another in the technology industry, Rakuten Inc. (which I am currently working on). Also, I know many foreigners who worked here without knowledge of Japanese.

I put the name of both companies because, if you want to apply to companies that do not require Japanese, these are some of them. (Remark: If someone gets a job because of my answer, please beg

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Yes it is, especially for experienced professionals.

I worked in two companies that did not require Japanese skills at all, at least in many departments. One in the automotive industry, Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), and another in the technology industry, Rakuten Inc. (which I am currently working on). Also, I know many foreigners who worked here without knowledge of Japanese.

I put the name of both companies because, if you want to apply to companies that do not require Japanese, these are some of them. (Remark: if anyone gets a job because of my answer, please let me know in some way, maybe on LinkedIn, I'd love to know. I'll also put up some job search lessons below that I hope can help someone.)

The point is, if you're not good at Japanese, you should have years of experience and a good profile to make up for it in some way. Of course, again, there are exceptions. I dare say I was one of them. I had no years of experience (despite internships) and I still got a job in one of the largest companies in Japan, with no knowledge of Japanese.

I say this because, for people like me, there is hope. You should have a job search strategy. So, here are some tips:

1) If you are inexperienced, build it however you can.
- If you are still in your home country and you are not in a rush to come here, I would recommend that you try to work in a company there before, and at least have something to show companies when you are here.
- If you are here as a student, try to do as many practices as you can. Even though many companies don't consider internships a real experience, it's better than nothing, right? And it can open doors for you. Also, get involved in activities that allow you to meet people and discover your passions: student organizations, competitions and anything that can make you learn something, especially with people, and also express who you are in your CV. Remember: people hire people, not CVs, so it is possible to show who you are by the activities you do. Examples of activities you can do as a student in Japan: hackathons, tech events / meetings, Hult Prize Foundation (if you are interested in social entrepreneurship), AIESEC (I was never actually part of any activity in Japan,
- If you are here working in factories, restaurants, etc., don't be afraid to keep looking for opportunities. I worked in a factory before and I saw a lot of people with great profiles who stopped looking for opportunities, not believing that they can. The longer you don't realize that you can, the more difficult it becomes.

2) Target companies and positions that might fit your profile.
This is important. Many people, including me at some point, applied for so many companies and positions that I saw. But, as you can imagine, there are limitations for non-Japanese speakers.
Below you can find some companies that do not require Japanese, at least for some positions.
- Recruitment sector: many foreigners who did not have as much experience work as recruiters. Unfortunately, I was looking for COVID-19 jobs on occasion, so as you can imagine, they get more selective at those times, and most of them weren't hiring or were only hiring with industry experience, which didn't require of them. training. Hopefully, by the time you're reading it, the situation has improved, so here are some company names to apply for: Robert Walters, Robert Half, Michael Page, Randstad, Wahl + Case,…
- Consulting companies: Yes, they hire people without Japanese, but yes, it is really difficult. If you are inexperienced, the chances are really low. But still, you can get close to those companies, I got an interview for one of them, so you might have a chance. Companies to check: BCG, Accenture, Frost & Sullivan,…
- Technology companies: again, a lot of people who don't know Japanese, but a really competitive industry. Companies to check: Rakuten, Google, Microsoft, Apple,…
- Financial industry. Companies to verify: BNP Paribas
- Automotive Industry. Companies to verify: Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), Nissan, BMW, ...
Actually, there are likely to be jobs in any industry, whether the business is global, or is targeting international people in some way. My recommendation is to search LinkedIn for your destination position and put "Japan" as the location, and verify the profile of foreigners. Check if they don't have a high level of Japanese and list all their companies. You don't even need to contact them, even though some of them can give you valuable information by reviewing your CV.

3) Recruiters can help you get a job.
My recommendation is to keep your LinkedIn page up to date and add as many recruiters as you can (look for people who work at Michal Page, Robert Walters, Randstad, Wahl + Case,…). You don't even need to message them. If they think your profile is interesting and they have a job, or might have one in the future, they will contact you and probably schedule a call with you. One thing about Japan is that recruiters in Tokyo lack good professionals, so they don't need to contact you if they think your profile is good enough. Calls with them can be really revealing. I got a lot of my job search knowledge from recruiters' calls. Little insights into the market and the companies I can fit into that completely changed my job search journey. They can also put your profile in the company's database and contact you later. By the way, this is how I got my job. I was contacted by a recruiter at first, he didn't have a chance at the time, but he put my CV in his company database. A few months later, another recruiter contacted me and got me an interview.

4) Of course, if possible, learn Japanese.

Ideally, of course, you should learn Japanese, get more opportunities, and get the best of the country.

But the truth is that learning Japanese takes a lot of time and dedication, especially for Westerners. To have a good level of Japanese (JLPT N2 - upper intermediate), at least two years of intense study would be required. Really intense, almost full time I would say. It has some exceptions, of course, of people who immerse themselves in Japanese settings, love the culture, and / or want to be here for their entire lives. But yes, it requires a lot of time and motivation. Motivation that people who intend to be here for a few years and time that can sometimes be devoted to other priorities, such as technical studies, for example, which can be useful in any country, do not have.

When I came to Japan, I came as a transfer student from Brazil. I studied at a university whose language of instruction was English and all my colleagues were international students. I would have two years of study at the university and of course I hope to be fluent in Japanese by the end of these 2 years. That's when I spoke to a professional counselor and he told me that at the end of 2 years, I should aim for an N3 level of Japanese. N3 is intermediate level and doesn't really make much of a difference when looking for a job. For job search, most of the time they are: you speak fluent or it doesn't matter. I also spoke with many people who spent years in Japan, working people who did not learn the language properly. So that's why I changed my strategy to make the most of these 2 years and get hired.

In short, some of the jobs you can get if you don't have Japanese:
1) English teacher (especially if you are a native English speaker)
2) Recruiter
3) Programmers, designers and other technical professionals
4) I work in a large international company , if you have experience and a good profile
5) Jobs in factories, restaurants, convenience stores, ...
There are other possibilities, I met entrepreneurs, researchers, psychologists, teachers of other subjects, cooks, but these above are the most common for those who They don't speak Japanese, from the people I met over the years.

Implicit in Matt Riggsby's answer, quite correct as far as it goes, is that there are huge “economies of scale” in film making.

Cinema, more than almost any other art form, is a collaborative medium, with literally hundreds or even thousands of people involved in any independent film other than the smallest. (Stay in your seat while ALL the credits roll - everyone else will have left the theater long before they get to the end.) There are not only actors and directors, but a wide range of producers and other executives, agents, cinematographers and filmmakers. set designers and builders and makeup artists

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Implicit in Matt Riggsby's answer, quite correct as far as it goes, is that there are huge “economies of scale” in film making.

Cinema, more than almost any other art form, is a collaborative medium, with literally hundreds or even thousands of people involved in any independent film other than the smallest. (Stay in your seat while ALL the credits roll - everyone else will have left the theater long before they get to the end.) There are not only actors and directors, but a wide range of producers and other executives, agents, cinematographers and filmmakers. set designers and builders and makeup and costume craftsmen and people who handle budgets, catering and transportation and a trillion other hidden but necessary components to make a movie - it's like preparing for the D-Day landings.

What this means is that once a critical mass has developed in a given location, in this case Southern California ("Hollywood" itself is just a small, now inconsequential district of Los Angeles that has come to represent the whole shed), it becomes much more convenient to make a movie there than anywhere else in the US, at least in terms of logistics. Movies are now shot in a much wider variety of "locations" than a century ago, when they were all recreated on Hollywood's back lots, but infrastructure and technicians remain highly concentrated in Southern California. (See the UK, where Greater London plays a similar role.)

So you could certainly make a movie or two in Chicago, Atlanta, or Houston, but you'll likely find over time that you find yourself at a competitive disadvantage compared to filmmakers working in Southern California. Only New York is competitive (because much of television is focused there), but it is even more expensive and more crowded than "Hollywood."

Your question is about the best job for someone fluent in Japanese, which is not what I really expected. This question may best be asked of someone who wants to work in Japan and has little or no Japanese skills.

The answer to your question is subjective. It largely depends on how that person defines the best job and being a fluent Japanese is just a huge bonus. Having a good skill will help you land the "best job" for yourself. I can't say what is best for you as I have no idea of ​​your abilities or your personality or your long-term goal. People think the best job is any of the following

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Your question is about the best job for someone fluent in Japanese, which is not what I really expected. This question may best be asked of someone who wants to work in Japan and has little or no Japanese skills.

The answer to your question is subjective. It largely depends on how that person defines the best job and being a fluent Japanese is just a huge bonus. Having a good skill will help you land the "best job" for yourself. I can't say what is best for you as I have no idea of ​​your abilities or your personality or your long-term goal. People think the best job is any of the following (not limited in Japan)

  • A job that will allow you to practice the profession you always dreamed of.
  • A well-paid non-managerial job (medical specialists, technicians)
  • A job with high exposure and considerable power in an organization (Manager, Director, CEO, President, Politicians)
  • A job that allows you to travel the world for free (field scientists, geologist, flight attendant, sailor)
  • A job that allows you to serve humanity with a greater purpose (researcher, scientists, public servants)
  • A job that you like and that you no longer treat as a job but as a hobby (this is my own definition of best job).

All of these professions are possible in Japan, and with the right skills, anyone can get their own "best job." I know many people who have limited Japanese but have been able to get their "best job" (number 2 on the list above). I know people who used to be an English teacher and have no technical or engineering background, but have been able to land their dream job of becoming an engineer in Japan. And finally, some people were able to get their "best job" by learning Japanese fluently first (L1 / L2) and through it finding the best job that suits their purpose.

First, are you looking for a full-time job or a part-time job?

If you are looking for a part-time job, there is an app called Town Work. However, you need a basic level of Japanese to search because the job in the city is in Japanese. But since you live in Japan, I hope you are learning the Japanese language.

Second, if you are looking for a full-time job, it could be difficult to find without knowledge of the Japanese language. I have met many foreigners who have become English teachers. To become an English teacher, you must be a native speaker. I will recommend the INDEED app to search for full or part time work.

Th

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First, are you looking for a full-time job or a part-time job?

If you are looking for a part-time job, there is an app called Town Work. However, you need a basic level of Japanese to search because the job in the city is in Japanese. But since you live in Japan, I hope you are learning the Japanese language.

Second, if you are looking for a full-time job, it could be difficult to find without knowledge of the Japanese language. I have met many foreigners who have become English teachers. To become an English teacher, you must be a native speaker. I will recommend the INDEED app to search for full or part time work.

There are some cases where you can find work in a place where there are a lot of foreigners. The types of jobs are waiters, work related to software or hardware, work related to machinery.

Lastly, what I mean is that if you have any skills (some of the ones I mentioned above), then it is easier to find a job than not having any skills. Thank you and good luck.

Generally yes, it is very difficult.

Attempting to apply for the Japan office of an American company from outside Japan almost certainly would not yield any positive results. In fact, you will most likely not pass even an automatic assessment because you would not be entitled to work in Japan at the time of application.

If you are trying to apply for a corporate job while already working in Japan in a non-corporate job like ESL, you would have a slightly better chance of currently being in Japan. Still, unless you have reasonably decent Japanese skills and are a good candidate for

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Generally yes, it is very difficult.

Attempting to apply for the Japan office of an American company from outside Japan almost certainly would not yield any positive results. In fact, you will most likely not pass even an automatic assessment because you would not be entitled to work in Japan at the time of application.

If you are trying to apply for a corporate job while already working in Japan in a non-corporate job like ESL, you would have a slightly better chance of currently being in Japan. Still, unless you have reasonably decent Japanese skills and are a good fit for the position, you are unlikely to be successful.

There are basically two ways that I think are ideal to work here.

  1. You are a student in Japan and you are very proficient in Japanese. That could mean being a language student or a college student in general.
  2. You work at the headquarters of an American company that is actively expanding. You have your own skills and a network of internal relationships and you play long-term to get a transfer to Japan. Your value would be your proprietary knowledge and HQ connections. Of course doing this may take a few years and is not a guarantee even then, but you would be very well established in Japan thereafter. Most of these assignments are for 2 to 3 years and then people return to their headquarters, transfer to another location, or go local.

I know one who is fiverr, you can also google it, which offers a real job online. You will have many options. I suggest you choose independent websites. These websites really pay you.

I can guarantee you that no one in Japan will hire you without an interview. You can certainly apply through job sites, online websites, but most will want you to be a Japanese resident or have an existing visa. If you are in the US and you expect someone to hire you without being seen, without an interview or visa and magically wait for you to show up in Japan in 2 months, keep dreaming.

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