How can I cut ties with my abusive 18-year-old son?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Noemi Simon



How can I cut ties with my abusive 18-year-old son?

Adolescents can be corrected, especially those who have just entered adulthood. That said, you know your relationship with your son much better than I do, and it seems like you've already made up your mind. Having additional family members who know you both and can have a say in the situation might be a good idea. If the situation is so bad that you are involved in drugs, criminal activity, jail or prison, you do not get a job, you are abusive, you have children and do not pay child support, and you have a bad life in general, you may owe do what you should do. .

too easy. you just received an eviction notice t

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Adolescents can be corrected, especially those who have just entered adulthood. That said, you know your relationship with your son much better than I do, and it seems like you've already made up your mind. Having additional family members who know you both and can have a say in the situation might be a good idea. If the situation is so bad that you are involved in drugs, criminal activity, jail or prison, you do not get a job, you are abusive, you have children and do not pay child support, and you have a bad life in general, you may owe do what you should do. .

too easy. you just got an eviction notice to get you off your property and stop talking. That is all.

Since the question is very short, we have to make some assumptions and go from there.

I assume you are a single parent, you live in a neighborhood that has an "active social life on the street" and you never disciplined your son for his misgivings. You became his property and you cannot change that now. He still lives with you in your house.

If the above is on target, you have limited resources. One of them is to tell him that since he reached maturity it is time for him to move on and move in to live an independent life without your involvement.

Give him an eviction notice. Are alone. Even if it is your son, you can legally evict him once he is 18 years old. This should get you to grow up, get a job, and in the long run, probably end up appreciating / respecting you.

First, you put your foot down as the father teaches him to respect authority in your home and uses the back of your hand if necessary. You don't allow your children to run you off. If you don't learn now, you will learn later when someone puts a hot pair on you.

I am from Michigan. But in our state, a person becomes emancipated at the age of 17, and that is the age at which he can be legally expelled. If your child is abusive, take him out of the house and if he refuses to leave, call the police and they will escort him. I speak from experience as a mother who loved her child but had to use Toughlove. in my case, my son came back two years later, older, wiser, and changed. I hope you follow my advice.

Ask him to get out of his house and find a place of his own. Deprive him of opportunities to abuse you. You can also file a police report. It is not a child. Adults are not allowed to commit crimes without suffering the consequences.

If it is abusive, call the police.

If he graduated or dropped out of school, evict him.

If YOU want to cut all ties with someone, get a job teaching English in a foreign country and enjoy your life.

You should get him advice. Get him into a psych ward and confine him for bipolar and get him on meds.

Simple ... ignore it and cut it off. No visits. No calls. No message. Let him be abusive for himself and himself!

You are 18 years old; a legal adult. Throw it in and make it find its own home.

I'm not sure you should at all

I'm not sure that children come out of the womb as abusive people, they become abusive by being abused, damaged and neglected in life, usually by their closest ones. If you are his father, you should look at yourself and see what you have done to that child, he is still a child at 18 years old, the legal books say many things that I would know, but that does not mean that they are all. It is true that he is an adult in everything except maturity. If you cast it, you only show your inability as a parent. Growing up, I like that unfortunate people had a horrible manipulative father, I hated my father, he was a narcissist with paranoid staff

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I'm not sure that children come out of the womb as abusive people, they become abusive by being abused, damaged and neglected in life, usually by their closest ones. If you are his father, you should look at yourself and see what you have done to that child, he is still a child at 18 years old, the legal books say many things that I would know, but that does not mean that they are all. It is true that he is an adult in everything except maturity. If you do, you only show your inability as a parent. Growing up I like that most unfortunate people had a horrible manipulative father, he hated my father, he was a narcissist with paranoid personality disorder, he abused me and my mother, the latter physically; I still remember that I was 17 years old and I hit him several times in the face for an insult, Would I take it back? he never deserved it. If that's your son for you,

NO child wants to hate their parents if your child hates you, sorry to say, but you or their mother are the problem. I would suggest talking to him and asking him what he wants and providing that to him, after all he is your son. He is just a child to the rest of the world and throwing him into the world unprepared and damaged will make him hate you enough to see you dead. Therapy would go a long way toward resolving the trauma that you've clearly been through. As for moving out, you'll be ready to do it only once you can deal with your internal issues, then get you a job, a goal for the future, a place to stay, a little car, a little love, and he'll be on my way. .

May I ask how your son got to the point where you now question his behavior? You raised it. Are you so unconscious and out of touch with your friends and their activities that you fear "dangerous" activities? In this decade, the most dangerous activities, firearms, drug use and computer fraud fall.
You may notice that homosexuality is not one of the things.
The specific answer is DON'T tell him he can't bring boys. If you fear something "dangerous", the worst thing you can do is send it to another place without the presence of its parents.
Your job is to know what they are doing. Then ma

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May I ask how your son got to the point where you now question his behavior? You raised it. Are you so unconscious and out of touch with your friends and their activities that you fear "dangerous" activities? In this decade, the most dangerous activities, firearms, drug use and computer fraud fall.
You may notice that homosexuality is not one of the things.
The specific answer is DON'T tell him he can't bring boys. If you fear something "dangerous", the worst thing you can do is send it to another place without the presence of its parents.
Your job is to know what they are doing. So maybe it involves keeping the door open. Then bring refreshments without notice.
Your problem is trying to establish rules that will create a gap and not correct a problem. A meaningful discussion is much more effective than telling who you can't have in your home. As the father of children, I welcomed them to bring their friends. You could keep an eye on them and set rules for their activity. He is 16 years old. In two years you will be destined for college or the workplace. The time has passed when you must begin to teach him how to live in a world when you are not there. Say no ……. o Not allowed will not work.
It all comes down to you not being willing to say that I don't want sexual activity in my house.
That is a gender neutral statement and an appropriate parental expectation regardless of sexual preference.
Good decisions are the key.
Worrying about danger does not teach you to make decisions.
Begin by expressing your concerns and let him explain why your fears are unfounded.

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