How can I better look for a job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Lola Wells



How can I better look for a job?

You're in luck because graphic designers are in high demand!

The first thing to do is create a website if you don't already have it. And have a PDF file of your best work ready for download. Your website should be your name or your name plus art / director, for example http://andreamisirdesigner.com

Having a well-designed, clean, and functional website that showcases your best work will make you a very commercial candidate.

I would also create profiles on sites like Upwork, Fiverr, Peopleperhour, and Thumbtack to find people who need graphic designers (and there are a lot of companies out there.

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You're in luck because graphic designers are in high demand!

The first thing to do is create a website if you don't already have it. And have a PDF file of your best work ready for download. Your website should be your name or your name plus art / director, for example http://andreamisirdesigner.com

Having a well-designed, clean, and functional website that showcases your best work will make you a very commercial candidate.

I would also create profiles on sites like Upwork, Fiverr, Peopleperhour, and Thumbtack to find people who need graphic designers (and there are many companies around the world that need one).

You should also have a LinkedIn profile showing your work to make it easier for hiring managers to find you.

Good luck!

Staying organized. There are really useful online sites like Sizigi that has an app tracker, you can upload deadlines, work requests, and it will generate reminders to make sure you stay on the right track. You will be able to see your progress and everything on one page, which makes your job search much more efficient. Here is a link for you: https: //go.joinsizigi.com/karis

Hi, I am struggling to find a job for the summer. Can you help me?"

I get several of these requests every month, on Quora or LinkedIn. I try to be a nice guy and help out when I can, but an application like that tells me why you are struggling to find a job.

  1. You're a bum. You took two seconds to write that request and left it open for me to do all the work. I don't know anything about you, I have no idea what you've tried so far, your abilities, your ambition, etc. Then you ask me an open question that leaves me all the detective work. Now, I have to email you and say "Could you please
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Hi, I am struggling to find a job for the summer. Can you help me?"

I get several of these requests every month, on Quora or LinkedIn. I try to be a nice guy and help out when I can, but an application like that tells me why you are struggling to find a job.

  1. You're a bum. You took two seconds to write that request and left it open for me to do all the work. I don't know anything about you, I have no idea what you've tried so far, your abilities, your ambition, etc. Then you ask me an open question that leaves me all the detective work. Now, I have to email you and say "Could you tell me more?", Writing a response that takes a lot more effort than your initial request. My personal favorite is when you text me with "Hey."
  2. I'm busy. You don't give me the next specific step to take. It takes too much thinking for a total stranger and I have other things going on in my life. Your application is open, difficult, and requires substantial effort. How am I going to be charged for answering this?

The importance of specificity

Richard Nesbitt and Lee Ross conducted an experiment with Stanford students, who were asked to list the most generous students they knew, as well as the most selfish.

Lists were created and the researchers contacted these groups to ask them to contribute to a food drive. They divided them into two groups, with the difference that instructions were given.

The first group received a vague request from “Dear Student” asking them to donate food and telling them where they could leave it and when.

The second group received a much more specific direction. They were addressed by name in the letter, given instructions on specific takeout foods (i.e. creamed corn), a map directing them to the mailbox, a specific time to visit, and then a follow-up call reminding them what to do. they learned from the letter.

  • Students who received vague instructions donated 8% and 0% for the generous and selfish groups, respectively.
  • Students who were offered specific instructions increased to 42% and 25%.

Even one in four idiots showed up with some creamed corn, due in large part to how specific the instructions were. The researchers removed all thought from the process, with the sole decision to make it on the fly or not.

Facilitate help

When I suggest to a job applicant that they should reach out to as many decision makers as possible, I often hear "I tried, it doesn't work."

Maybe you have tried. How many did you get close to? Five? Ten? How about 500? How badly do you want a better job?

Your alternative is to start your own business and I assure you that you will be reaching out to far more strangers than 500 to get there.

How easy are you making it for those to whom you communicate? Do you leave them with open applications to help you?

How many decisions do they have to make when they open their email?

  1. Give a quick introduction. Think of a boy who sells Girl Scout cookies and knocks on your door. Hi, I'm Sarah with Girl Scouts. I live three blocks from the street. "Okay, we got him out of the way and I understand exactly why he's standing on my porch.
  2. Make it clear why you have contacted them in particular. Let them know that you did your research to reach their email address and that you need their particular help for a specific reason.
  3. Make a direct request for something that is simple, actionable, and requires no other thought process than yes or no. If you start with the highest level person you can find, the question is most likely something like "Could you please forward this email to the person directly responsible for hiring this position?"

Now they have a decision to make. They can forward the email to someone on your network, who is probably junior at your post if you did the homework. Or they can delete your email.

They still probably won't help you, just like 75% of the idiots in the study haven't donated to the food drive yet. That said, you have a much better chance of taking action on your behalf if you are clear, direct, and ask for something that requires a quick decision or action.

Do the work for the person you need help from. Make it easy to help you.

I think the reason certain job search tactics are rare is because they are NOT effective. But it's okay.

At first glance, I wanted to suggest Craigslist. I got several decent jobs on that site, although none have lasted long and there is a clear risk in using those sites to find work.

Other responses suggest networking all the way to the boss, or going straight to the site and asking for a job. To be totally honest with you, I don't think these methods are uncommon at all. I have worked since I was fifteen and in all the jobs I have had, I have witnessed how someone uses one or both or

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I think the reason certain job search tactics are rare is because they are NOT effective. But it's okay.

At first glance, I wanted to suggest Craigslist. I got several decent jobs on that site, although none have lasted long and there is a clear risk in using those sites to find work.

Other responses suggest networking all the way to the boss, or going straight to the site and asking for a job. To be totally honest with you, I don't think these methods are uncommon at all. I've been working since I was fifteen and in every job I've had, I've seen someone employ one or both of these tactics. And I myself have used them many times.

In fact, it has been very difficult to think of unusual job search practices that actually work. After much thought, I would say that the most infrequent but effective tactic is to be persistent without being overbearing.

For example, if you are networking to get to a job, do so without appearing superficial, self-absorbed, or scathing. If you are boldly walking in to ask for a job, you can handle rejection like an adult and have the patience to wait more than a few days before trying again. Having the gall to apply for a job you want a second or even a third time… but waiting patiently between applications so as not to come across as pushy, impatient, or desperate. For me, this is the weirdest thing ... that individual who can persist without exaggeration. The person who can insist on being considerate, with TACT. If you can master this skill, it is effective AND admirable.

That's what people keep saying, but it really depends. 1997 was the year I graduated from college. I finished my dissertation in April and my graduation was not until October. I applied for a handful of jobs, had at least 2 interviews, and was at my first job in May. So I couldn't believe how easy it was to get a job. However, keeping it was another matter. He was idealistic and had a good idea about how things should work in the workplace. He believed in rigidly enforcing the rules, no matter what. Customers who didn't like to follow the rules annoyed me a lot. They started to complain

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That's what people keep saying, but it really depends. 1997 was the year I graduated from college. I finished my dissertation in April and my graduation was not until October. I applied for a handful of jobs, had at least 2 interviews, and was at my first job in May. So I couldn't believe how easy it was to get a job. However, keeping it was another matter. He was idealistic and had a good idea about how things should work in the workplace. He believed in rigidly enforcing the rules, no matter what. Customers who didn't like to follow the rules annoyed me a lot. They started complaining about me and my job security started to look questionable. In that situation, it was definitely easier to get the job than to keep it.

Now I am a teacher of English as a foreign language in China and have been for almost 7 years. Teaching is obviously something that I can do quite well, well enough to survive anyway. I have never felt more secure in my work. Keeping my job shouldn't be a big deal, at least for the foreseeable future.

For me, getting into TEFL was not easy at all. I tried to dedicate myself to teaching English as a foreign language in 2009, after I was fired in the wake of the global financial crisis. But it took me 4 years of job search, rejections, and unemployment before I finally made it to China in 2013. The industry tends to be highly discriminatory and many schools prefer young Caucasian teachers. If you are not white or if you are too old, you will have a difficult time entering this line of work, regardless of how skilled or experienced you may be. As a British Chinese, I initially faced a lot of racism in my job search. The English as a foreign language market still has this mindset that English is the white man's language, so anyone who is not white cannot teach English.

After hundreds of thousands of job applications are submitted on our platform each year, we have 5 things you can do to make sure you get noticed. Do you want to read the full article? Find it here.

1. Show your personality

Your CV and cover letter are a reflection of your professional skills and abilities. But they are also the first impression hiring managers have of you. Studies have shown that matching your personality and organizational culture is essential to your success and your time with the company.

2. Show how you keep learning

Employers value enthusiasm for learning and developing your skills. It means

Keep reading

After hundreds of thousands of job applications are submitted on our platform each year, we have 5 things you can do to make sure you get noticed. Do you want to read the full article? Find it here.

1. Show your personality

Your CV and cover letter are a reflection of your professional skills and abilities. But they are also the first impression hiring managers have of you. Studies have shown that matching your personality and organizational culture is essential to your success and your time with the company.

2. Show how you keep learning

Employers value enthusiasm for learning and developing your skills. It means that you are willing to grow with your employer and that you are willing to continually provide value.

3. Highlight the results

Most of the tasks you perform have a specific goal. And it's your job to quantify how well you performed and how. Otherwise, how will a hiring manager understand the value you can bring to them?

4. Add suggestions and ideas

Adding suggestions and ideas to your application is not as risky as you might think. Don't worry if your ideas completely fail - hiring managers will value your time and effort.

5. Actively work your network

Make sure to tell your former co-workers, your fellow students, your friends, and your family what your skills are and what you are looking for.

We hope these tips help you! Find a longer answer here, and good luck in your job search!

An old friend explained his online search method to me and I found it very interesting. Take it for what it's worth, not something I've tried, but it's worth reading.

Looking for work online is difficult, but it can be a good starting point. You will find millions of jobs posted online, you can assume 500-1000 resumes are submitted to a single job posting, if not more. This sounds impossible to attract attention with so much competition, however, the good news is that employers do not have time to go through all these resumes. With today's technology, we have software for everything, including

Keep reading

An old friend explained his online search method to me and I found it very interesting. Take it for what it's worth, not something I've tried, but it's worth reading.

Looking for work online is difficult, but it can be a good starting point. You will find millions of jobs posted online, you can assume 500-1000 resumes are submitted to a single job posting, if not more. This sounds impossible to attract attention with so much competition, however, the good news is that employers do not have time to go through all these resumes. With today's technology, we have software for everything, including those that read resumes. Fortune 500 companies and most midsize companies now use ATS (Applicant Tracking System), understand that ATS will help improve your odds. The basic function of the ATS software is that searches are resumed by keywords to sort and organize them. The human resources manager reviews the resumes with the most hits that match the position. Therefore, your first step in an online search should be to review the job requirements. Next, you need to tailor your resume to include as many keywords as possible. This will increase your odd and bring your resume closer to the top of the pile. But read on before submitting your resume.

Check out employers' sites to familiarize yourself with what they do (products, services, top management, locations, etc.) and use the information you collect in your interactions with the employer. You will be most effective in creating your resume and your job interviews when you have thoroughly researched the employer. The most important thing is to get names of current people in the location you are interested in because the next step is old school but much more effective.

Networking is a valuable tool in your job search. Networking does not mean attending big events! Networking means staying in touch with people you know and meeting new people. And the best people to meet are the people you encountered during your research, who already work at the company that interests you. Employers prefer to hire someone they know rather than a complete stranger from the street.

So how do you meet the people of the company? LinkedIn is a great place to meet people. If you don't have an account, I recommend that you create one. Make sure your profile matches your resume and includes those keywords. LinkedIn is one of the best places online to connect with people who work at your target employers. You can also find job openings and employer / company pages that give you information about the company, as well as how you could connect with current employees. Okay, now connect with them and start a conversation, be honest, tell them you saw the work posted and did some research and found them on LinkedIn. Show your interest in the company and ask questions like "how do you like to work at the company", "how long have you been there" and keep the conversation going as long as you continue to get a positive response. If you feel the answer is turning negative, be polite and thank them, then move on to the next name. If all goes well, they will know your name when they see your resume, or better yet, they can invite you to take you to the office.
If things went well, your resume is at the top of the pile and they know your name. I think your odds could be better than that resume that only had 2 keywords.

Again, this is not something that I have tried myself, but I did hire a guy who used this approach and had a lot of success with him. He was one of those who changed jobs every 2 years, that part did not work for me because I was the person who hired him. I really liked the way he explained it and thought I'd share it. Hope it helps you and get creative with that. Best of luck, let us know how it works.

We were looking for a doctor to be part of a public health project in a rural district. Although we advertised the vacancy twice, no one applied. One day, a friend sent me the CV of a doctor. She was a resident of the place where we had the vacancy. She had stopped working after marrying an army commander a few years ago. I asked for a call from the candidate.

That night I got the call, but it was the Major on the other side. He asked about the vacancy, the nature of the job, the salary, etc. I told him that I would visit his city the following week and that

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We were looking for a doctor to be part of a public health project in a rural district. Although we advertised the vacancy twice, no one applied. One day, a friend sent me the CV of a doctor. She was a resident of the place where we had the vacancy. She had stopped working after marrying an army commander a few years ago. I asked for a call from the candidate.

That night I got the call, but it was the Major on the other side. He asked about the vacancy, the nature of the job, the salary, etc. I told him that I would visit his city the following week and that I would like to meet the candidate for the first round of interactions. The meeting was scheduled at our local office the following Monday.

On Monday, around noon, I got a call from the major. I wanted to know if the meeting could take place on Tuesday. The reason was that he had gone to a distant duty station and would return only late at night. Because of this, it was difficult for him to accompany his wife to the meeting. I said it could be done later in that case. And that meeting never happened.

I was hoping the candidate would interact with me directly. In that case it did not happen. It was always the husband who spoke for his wife. Although she was in town, he was unwilling to send her alone for the interview. I thought that hiring such a candidate would cause unnecessary problems in the future.

Whenever you have to deal with a potential employer / recruiter, do so directly. Don't bring your parents or spouse in the middle. No employer appreciates it.

"What should I do while looking for work?"

Keep in mind that looking for work is a full-time job in itself. You should make an effort to set it up so that you are searching for leads and responding to exciting opportunities for several hours a day.

With that said, you don't want to have a big gap on your resume. You want to show potential employers that you are putting your time to good use and not just sitting at Starbucks.

A great way to fill the gap is through freelance or consulting work. Hopefully you will get paid for it, but even if not, it still looks good on the resume.

Another way is volunt

Keep reading

"What should I do while looking for work?"

Keep in mind that looking for work is a full-time job in itself. You should make an effort to set it up so that you are searching for leads and responding to exciting opportunities for several hours a day.

With that said, you don't want to have a big gap on your resume. You want to show potential employers that you are putting your time to good use and not just sitting at Starbucks.

A great way to fill the gap is through freelance or consulting work. Hopefully you will get paid for it, but even if not, it still looks good on the resume.

Another way is volunteer work. If you can join the board of directors of a community group and spend some time with it, it is perfectly legitimate to include it on your resume. The same goes for volunteer work below board level.

But the most important thing is the job search itself, which can be difficult, lonely and daunting. Jump into it and keep honing your resume and work parameters until they closely match. Someone needs you!

The best and most effective way to find new job opportunities: create a short script about what you are looking for * exactly * and then share it, by phone or by email, in a personalized environment (NOT in a single email send) .

Don't worry if the person you are communicating with is not a close or immediate colleague; Remote acquisitions are equally likely to be helpful.

Also, don't worry if the person you are communicating with does not seem to have direct knowledge of your area; As long as you can accurately convey your script and your contact information, you should be fine.

Everything

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The best and most effective way to find new job opportunities: create a short script about what * exactly * you are looking for and then share it, by phone or by email, in a personalized environment (NOT in a single email send) .

Don't worry if the person you are communicating with is not a close or immediate colleague; Remote acquisitions are equally likely to be helpful.

Also, don't worry if the person you are communicating with does not seem to have direct knowledge of your area; As long as you can accurately convey your script and your contact information, you should be fine.

The general idea is that you are declaring your specific interests on various networks.

Good luck,

There are multiple opportunity providers available on the web domain and some consulting services can also be found offline. Check the news papers first to find work locally if you prefer to work locally. Whatever your qualification, continually improve your skills and update to current market situations. Then only you will excel in your career.

https: //hwsupport.netlify.app | Knowledge exchange portal PUBLISH YOUR QUERY FOR A SOLUTION https://hwsupport.netlify.app

, on this site job opportunities are published in both the public and private domain. Please take a look and all the best for your future success.

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