How can I become a youth representative to the United Nations? What are the requirements to be considered an eligible candidate?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Noel Mcpherson



How can I become a youth representative to the United Nations? What are the requirements to be considered an eligible candidate?

More than 18 years.

A person who is recognized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of that nation.

A person who has a great knowledge of International Affairs.

Requirements:
Applicants must:
• be enrolled in a degree-granting program (ie, master's or doctoral level) at a graduate school during the internship;
• be studying in countries where higher education is not divided into undergraduate and graduate stages, you must have completed at least three years of university studies;
• not be older than 30 years.

Before submitting the application, it is necessary to consider the following criteria:
• The student must be enrolled in a Master's or Ph.D. program at a graduate school at the time of application and also during the internship.
• The student can obtain the necessary visas and organize the trip to the United Nations Headquarters in New York.
• The student can cover the expenses of travel, accommodation, as well as the living expenses of the internship (approximately US $ 5,000).
• Student can show proof of valid main and regular health insurance.
• The student is able to communicate fluently in English or French.
• Include an up-to-date resume, transcript of grades, and short essay in English or French stating the purpose of obtaining the internship.
The application form, as well as all the above documents, must be sent in English or French and must be sent in two copies to the following address no earlier than 8 months and no later than 6 months before the start of the planned period:

A job at the UN is essentially a government job and most of the pros and cons are very similar.

Pro:

  1. Ability to work with international people
    People who work at the UN generally reflect the demographics of their member countries quite accurately if the UN is viewed as a complete organization.
    If you work in a country office or regional office, your coworkers will reflect much more closely the demographics of the area you are in, with fewer international people there. But even an office in the country will always have some foreigners. Only New York, Vienna, Geneva and Nairobi are very international.
  2. Wo
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A job at the UN is essentially a government job and most of the pros and cons are very similar.

Pro:

  1. Ability to work with international people
    People who work at the UN generally reflect the demographics of their member countries quite accurately if the UN is viewed as a complete organization.
    If you work in a country office or regional office, your coworkers will reflect much more closely the demographics of the area you are in, with fewer international people there. But even an office in the country will always have some foreigners. Only New York, Vienna, Geneva and Nairobi are very international.
  2. Working with experts
    Most people at the United Nations should have a good level of experience in one area or another. Therefore, you usually work with professionals who are also experienced. A great place to learn.
  3. Salary
    Salary can be, and usually is, quite good if you come from a developing country. If you come from a developed nation (Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, EU / Europe, North America,…) the salaries are not attractive. While they are not horrible, money would never be a reason to choose a job at the UN. Contractor positions can pay well as they are adjusted to market rates at the place where the work is performed, but technically you are not a UN employee / staff member at the time.
    In Vienna and New York, private sector wages for similar jobs would pay 50% more.
  4. Relaxed workplace
    The pace of work is generally not high. There is no profit pressure, which is good for many people. However, some people need this and the UN is not ideal for you.
    In general, your job is very 9 to 5, unless you choose not to.
  5. Benefits
    Being a member of the UN staff has benefits, for example:
    1. quite good private health insurance plan (useful even in the EU, where centralized public health is good),
    2. depending on its function, tax relief,
    3. tax exempt vehicles (not a very big issue in the US, but a huge benefit in the EU / Europe, Australia, etc. as it can reduce your purchase by 40% to 50%, even 80% in Singapore)
    4. UNFCU banking offers a few distinct benefits and you can retain this benefit FOR LIFE, even if you leave the UN.
    5. CCPPNU - pension fund. Like banking, you can hold this for life, if you wish ... albeit with some limitations after leaving the UN (especially if you paid for only a few years)
  6. Networking
    The UN may not be your ultimate career goal, but by joining as a younger person (under 30) you can build a large network of contacts that will invariably end up spreading across the globe as the years go by. . This can be extremely useful one day if you want to start your own business, grow an existing business.
    But it's also great for friends all over the place.
  7. People
    Like any organization that is huge, not all people will be your friends or even necessarily like you. But the UN has a good chunk of people with a common set of values ​​and if you share those values ​​then it's a good group of people to work with. The people there mostly understand that they are working to make sure the world is not shattered in a deranged war. And you know it every day.

Swindle:

  1. Bureaucracy
    The UN is extremely burdened with red tape and red tape. Something is necessary, but there is too much. Many people think so. It raises costs and, in recent decades, has essentially caused many developed nations to drastically reduce the amount of funds they invest in the UN.
  2. Corruption
    Corruption is definitely a problem. I won't say much more than this because my previous role allowed me some unique insights on this, but suffice it to say that the combination of this and the bureaucracy has greatly damaged the reputation of the UN with many wealthy nations ... particularly those nations that They have gone to great lengths to implement their own anti-corruption programs.
  3. Hierarchy
    The UN has a military-style classification system, but no promotion system. You cannot rise through the ranks like you can in almost any other organization. There is a process, but it is cumbersome, riddled with bizarre procedures and a series of promotions that make perfect logical sense and that, in fact, would benefit the interests of the UN, actually become almost impossible.

I have not listed things like dangerous countries, travel, responsibilities, or work for a respected organization because I believe that all of those points are true and false, depending on a number of factors.

In my opinion and in my experience, the UN does not send many people to dangerous countries and those that do are signing up and they know (hopefully) exactly what they are getting into.
Peacekeepers are NOT UN employees, they are enlisted soldiers in the service of the armed forces of the nation to which they belong. And a soldier probably knows that work can get him killed.

Travel is not an issue either. Most roles don't see you traveling. Maybe you would go to New York. Only a few specific roles see you travel, for example if you work with projects. For example, UNIDO, UNODC, etc. They have projects running in various countries and regions and if you are a project coordinator or your project has annual meetings where everyone gets together then there may be trips. This is like any large organization, be it government or private. Most of all, you sit in the same office every day and do your thing.

Responsibility ... most UN jobs are very strictly defined and you do exactly that and ONLY that. Responsibility really only exists in the upper ranks. Which is, in a way, part of the appeal if you like a life without a lot of stress and pressure. It's really no different than working anywhere else when it comes to liability.

Working for a respected organization. That is largely a matter of opinion and depends on where you are.

As I work within the UN system, I prefer to remain anonymous.

There are two types of staff in my UN agency: general service staff (“G staff”) and professional staff (“P staff”). The first step will be to decide what kind of staff you want to be.

G's staff are basically the people who keep the system running, usually secretaries, technicians, handymen, but also warehouse packers, cooks, etc. They are only hired locally at the destination.

Some examples (not exhaustive):

A typical secretary would be a G-4. These days, they are known as "team assistants", covering a wide

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As I work within the UN system, I prefer to remain anonymous.

There are two types of staff in my UN agency: general service staff (“G staff”) and professional staff (“P staff”). The first step will be to decide what kind of staff you want to be.

G's staff are basically the people who keep the system running, usually secretaries, technicians, handymen, but also warehouse packers, cooks, etc. They are only hired locally at the destination.

Some examples (not exhaustive):

A typical secretary would be a G-4. These days, they are known as "team assistants", covering a wide range of administrative tasks, including travel arrangements, filing, organizing workshops, and so on. In more technical areas, a lab technician or electrician would also be around G-3 or G -4. With experience, they can become G-5.

A G-5 is usually an assistant director rather than a section chief (the director is usually the chief of 3-5 section chiefs within a division), or their job is somewhat more specific and / or technical. A G-6 will be a highly experienced technician or administrative assistant who will take care of important division matters such as hiring, budgeting and finances, resource planning, etc.

At the low end, a G-1 would be, for example, a warehouse packer, a G-2 would be a lab assistant (mainly cleaning the lab), and a G-3 would be a cook, mail messenger, junior lab technician. and often a ticket. grade for newcomers placed in G-4 jobs.

The other category is the P staff:

Most of the time they will be senior scientists or technicians, engineers, translators or senior managers of entities that involve hundreds of people. P staff are hired from around the world and are paid much more than G staff; however, their tenure in the UN agency is generally limited to several years (with exceptions). Almost all managers are at the P-4 or P-5 level, division directors D-1 or D-2. "D staff" is rarely used, directors "count as P staff".

Young graduates with the proper scientific training often start out as P-1 (really fresh out of school, no experience). P-2 is, for example, a junior scientist with some experience, and P-3 a fairly broad category of established personnel with usual experience. Senior scientists are typically P-4, equivalent to junior managers (eg, Team Leaders).

So from the above your first question is: G or P? Personally, I am fortunate to live in a city with a UN agency and be employed there as G staff, which already pays very well.

Yes. The pay is good. That is one of the reasons why it is not easy to enter the United Nations system. Many people want to enter. And the vacancies are almost always distributed among the people who are already there.

Now you understand why I was anonymous. It is almost impossible to get in without a "door opener", either G or P level. Recruitment processes between staff categories differ considerably, and since I am a general service staff member, my additional lines will be more from the perspective of category G staff.

In my case, it was an old friend of my dad's within the system who told me exactly what to write on the online personal history form (UN slang for CV), how to write it, and where exactly to send it (yes, at that time still I sent it by post!). He or she told me what to wear, what questions to expect, etc. With the help of this person (and he / she "supporting" me internally), I was able to secure a short-term G-3 contract for three months. A humble assistant secretary job with a lot of photocopying and really quite mundane administrative tasks. But he paid me over $ 2,000 p / m - NET! (2005)

I continued for almost five years with short-term contracts. I was never "too good" at photocopying thick documents or packing boxes if office needs called for it. You must show will and dedication, and endure fear about the next extension of your contract, possibly for years. You also learn a lot of cool things, you learn what is needed here, and you can apply that knowledge. In general, you have to be willing to eat a humble cake, which does not mean that you allow people to screw you. But don't consider any mundane tasks "under you" at first.

You should also prepare to change jobs frequently initially. In the beginning, I was always the stand-in for this maternity leave secretary, that sick lady, this guy on a career development reassignment. That's great. You quickly learn a lot of different things.

But once you've managed to get into the system and prove yourself for a while, the most important step is to land a fixed-term contract. The hiring process for short-term contracts is comparatively unbureaucratic, designed to quickly obtain replacements for staff on sick leave / other assignments / retired, etc.

However, for a fixed period, you must formally apply for the job officially advertised on the UN agency website. You will compete against dozens of insiders and hundreds of outsiders (whose chances are negligible). You must "fear" more internal competitors ...

Often times, you will have done a great job on your temporary post, but now the time has come for it to be officially announced. Maybe the guy he's been replacing (because he himself was temporary at a higher grade level) now got the "highest job for real", and now he can do the same. Apply for your own job! To really get it.

You'll be faced with the fact that other 360s want that job too. But since you've already kept the hot chair on the desk for a while, your chances of getting it are very, very high if you've done a good job. However, they are never 100%.

And you will face a wait.

Getting a fixed term as a general service staff (less professional) rewards you with a very strong contract and very high job security. But between clicking the submit button and actually being interviewed (either for the job you're already sitting in, or another, if you're invited for an interview) three months can easily go by. When you walk out of the interview feeling pretty confident, you still need to prepare to wait two and a half to four months for that precious email informing you that you got the job. Seriously. Be patient.

You may also know in advance that your current job has a timestamp (maternity leave, she will come back), so you will apply for many jobs in addition to your current one, the ones that have already been advertised in the system. Be prepared to submit about 25 job applications and attend 7 interviews before you get the "Yes, baby!" Message. (my experience)

Wow ... not sure how focused this article was ... I am writing it today because I was privileged to be recently promoted to a higher G staff level. And I have a secure long-term contract. It has been a great battle within the UN system to get to where I am now. And I can still go further, but I'll let it rest for a while.

Good luck applicants! Maybe my information above will give you some useful ideas ...

Unfortunately, much of the NGO world is structured in this way, especially in the United States. It is essentially a supply and demand problem, where there are many recent graduates who like the idea of ​​working for the UN or a humanitarian organization, and also face a difficult job market, so there is a glut of supply. And many of these people majored in International Relations or Political Science, so they're all smart liberal arts degrees with no specific skills or experience. Everyone is so desperate for experience that they are willing to pay for it; is a systemic problem, both at the UN and

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Unfortunately, much of the NGO world is structured in this way, especially in the United States. It is essentially a supply and demand problem, where there are many recent graduates who like the idea of ​​working for the UN or a humanitarian organization, and also face a difficult job market, so there is a glut of supply. And many of these folks majored in International Relations or Political Science, so they're all smart liberal arts degrees with no specific skills or experience. Everyone is so desperate for experience that they are willing to pay for it; it is a systemic problem, both in the UN, in the NGO world and in the private sector.

That said, however, I know and have worked with many UN employees, and almost none of them started with an unpaid internship at the UN. The problem you are describing is very specific to people who insist on living in New York or Geneva. Here in Jordan, where there is a large UN presence due to all the surrounding conflicts, interns are generally paid and then if they are good they are hired as consultants after several months; in fact, most of my friends at the UN never did the internship. He passed. Many just came here and studied Arabic / taught English until they found a job in an NGO, and once you have one foot in the sector you are on your way.

Also, most of the people who enter the UN internship system are from the liberal arts majors listed above. I can see from your profile that you have degrees in data science and economics, and especially the former is highly sought after by the NGO world right now; Just this week I have received two calls from major international initiatives on the subject that they wanted mobile connectivity, which is my field. UNHCR has an 'innovation team' set up for these kinds of solutions, and I know that the International Rescue Committee (IRC) has a great New York-based science and technology team. And, of course, all field offices constantly need staff with technical knowledge: a friend of mine went from being a local staff to a highly desired P-3 programmer by becoming a GIS expert. NGOs always need tough skills.

My advice, in short, would be to a) just move to a developing country for a few months and try to make the connections to get an interview and b) don't get obsessed with the New York / Geneva political hub making news. . Most of what the UN does is not high-stakes diplomacy, but attempts on the ground to improve people's lives, with varying degrees of success. If you find the UN too bureaucratic and inefficient, there are dozens of other NGOs where you can put your foot in the door. But if you insist on living in DC, New York, or Geneva, well, you will find that the UN job market is no more hospitable than the other markets for interns.

First of all, I think you are still too young to represent. You need in-depth knowledge of certain issues related to the UN, the UN structure, etc. Furthermore, not many countries have such programs for youth participation in the UN.
As far as I know, there are only 8 countries that have such representatives in the General Assembly. If you are not from one of these countries, it will realistically be very difficult for you to convince or lobby your government to start such a program. Again, it depends solely on your country (hardest for e.g. India, Pakistan, China, etc. and considerably e

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First of all, I think you are still too young to represent. You need in-depth knowledge of certain issues related to the UN, the UN structure, etc. Furthermore, not many countries have such programs for youth participation in the UN.
As far as I know, there are only 8 countries that have such representatives in the General Assembly. If you are not from one of these countries, it will realistically be very difficult for you to convince or lobby your government to start such a program. Again, it depends solely on your country (hardest for eg India, Pakistan, China, etc. and considerably easy for countries like Hungary, Denmark, Finland, etc.).

As I have worked for the Model UN conferences, I can assure you that it is a very good experience to see the world come together on a single platform to participate in conversations and debates. But to become a (young) Ambassador, you will need to at least have completed your University with a specialization preferably in International Relations / Law / Economics. If you have previously worked in MUN conferences or have done internships at the UN or the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of your country (or equivalent) or have participated in Youth Forums, debates on current issues, etc., all of these will be considered and will have an impact on your selection process. to become a youth ambassador to the UN.

If your country does not have such a representation system at the UN, here are the steps to establish it:

Some countries have existing programs to select youth delegates. You can determine this by consulting the list of former youth delegates from previous years. If your country does not have a program to select a youth delegate, your task will be twofold:

  • First, you must convince your country of the importance of having a youth representative in your delegation to the UN General Assembly.
  • And secondly, once they have established the position, you will have to start a selection process.

Some steps you can consider include:

  • Determine if your country currently has a youth representation program. If so, ask through your foreign affairs department or a national youth council about how the application process works.
  • If your country does not currently have a youth representation program, you will have to lobby for one to be created. This can most effectively be achieved by working in cooperation with existing youth organizations in your country.
  • Sometimes the process can work very quickly, and sometimes it may take more effort for the young delegates to become part of government policy.
  • Some steps you could take include:
    • Write to your foreign minister (or equivalent), describe the merits of the youth delegates, and offer to meet for further discussion.
    • Get in touch with the Minister of Youth (or equivalent), senior public officials, the Ambassador to the UN, or even the Head of State.
    • You can also try to get letters of endorsement from all of the above, plus key civil society, national, and international leaders.
  • Once the proposal has been accepted and a nomination and selection procedure has been established, the next step would be to apply for the position.

Source :

http: //undesadspd.org/Youth/OurW ...

Considering your age, you still have a long way to go and learn before entering the UN (young or not) as it can be very competitive. But with hard work and special interest in world affairs, it is not impossible.

And now when you are ready with everything and have the feeling of diplomacy running through your veins, just go and sign up via the link below:

Record

PS: This question was originally answered by Mr. Hisham Hazarui, I have modified it a bit.

Here is the simplified version. You should be nominated by your country assuming you are not a citizen of the 5 permanent members of the UN Security Council (China, France, Russia, UK, USA). To be nominated, you would have to have become a prominent person, such as having been a minister (several of the previous SGS had been the foreign minister of their countries), or having reached a high level in the UN (like Kofi Annan, who he was at the level of Assistant Secretary General when he was nominated). Once nominated, your candidacy must be accepted and supported by the 5 permanent members as

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Here is the simplified version. You should be nominated by your country assuming you are not a citizen of the 5 permanent members of the UN Security Council (China, France, Russia, UK, USA). To be nominated, you would have to have become a prominent person, such as having been a minister (several of the previous SGS had been the foreign minister of their countries), or having reached a high level in the UN (like Kofi Annan, who he was at the level of Assistant Secretary General when he was nominated). Once nominated, your candidacy must be accepted and supported by the 5 permanent members, as well as by the majority of the Member States. Of course, you would also have to have language skills, relevant experience (in political science, for example, or development,

A title is a requirement, it's just something you check a box. Get the best grades. Get a master's degree if you can. Meet people who already work within the UN system. Network. If you want to know how important that is: sometimes UN staff members ask the question "does the front door still exist?" joke. Also, it is an advantage if you have a nationality that is currently underrepresented in the current staff number. So if you are American and would like to work at the Registry in New York, if you are Dutch and want to work in The Hague in one of the judicial institutions, or if you are Swiss and it is

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A title is a requirement, it's just something you check a box. Get the best grades. Get a master's degree if you can. Meet people who already work within the UN system. Network. If you want to know how important that is: sometimes UN staff members ask the question "does the front door still exist?" joke. Also, it is an advantage if you have a nationality that is currently underrepresented in the current staff number. So if you are American and would like to work at the Secretariat in New York, if you are Dutch and want to work in The Hague at one of the judicial institutions, or if you are Swiss and are looking to apply for a job at UNOG in Geneva, you will have less likely to get in than, say, someone from Benin or Brazil.

UNjobfinder, UNjobs, etc. they are excellent tools: I'm with Magnus here.

Also, don't do unpaid internships incessantly. If you do, people may start to think that you believe your work is worthless. A few, preferably geared to your interest, unpaid internships are fine, but no more than two years of unpaid internships as many people do.

The answer to this question has many dimensions, so I'll try to keep things simple:

  1. First of all, you must have a serious interest in world affairs and a college degree or two to demonstrate that interest.
  2. Second, I urge you to get a job as a UN Volunteer to gain some experience. Despite the name, United Nations Volunteers operate outside of the United Nations system. and it is much easier to get a job through them than a position at the UN. The big difference is money. But UNV pays your expenses and will give you an excellent introduction to UN peacekeeping work in the field, where about 80% of UN jobs are
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The answer to this question has many dimensions, so I'll try to keep things simple:

  1. First of all, you must have a serious interest in world affairs and a college degree or two to demonstrate that interest.
  2. Second, I urge you to get a job as a UN Volunteer to gain some experience. Despite the name, United Nations Volunteers operate outside of the United Nations system. and it is much easier to get a job through them than a position at the UN. The big difference is money. but UNV pays your expenses and will give you a great introduction to UN peacekeeping work in the field, where roughly 80% of UN jobs are located these days,
  3. If you are lucky and have a positive experience with UNV, you may be ready for the next step. Remember: personal connections are invaluable in explaining what is really going on. I love the UN, but dealing with UN human resources is not easy!
  4. UNV | VOLUNTEERS
  5. Good luck and take care!!:)

"To get a job at the United Nations"?

If that's all you want then give it up. Competition is fierce and internal contacts are between very important and essential.

If you are looking for a specific and useful job, follow JC's advice below.

I am constantly amazed and disgusted by the number of people whose sole goal is to get a comfortable, safe and tax-free job at the UN, without even considering what they might actually contribute.

And, from my experience after 3 years in the field with the UN, the headquarters are full of useless, idle, bureaucratic

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"To get a job at the United Nations"?

If that's all you want then give it up. Competition is fierce and internal contacts are between very important and essential.

If you are looking for a specific and useful job, follow JC's advice below.

I am constantly amazed and disgusted by the number of people whose sole goal is to get a comfortable, safe and tax-free job at the UN, without even considering what they might actually contribute.

And, in my experience after 3 years in the field with the UN, the headquarters are full of those bureaucratic, useless and idle nullities, which only serve to fatten the already heavy procedures of the UN.

I am not suggesting that OP is necessarily one of them. But the way the question is phrased undoubtedly raises suspicions. . . . .

The first step is to apply!

Applications are evaluated based on the individual's work or involvement, achievements, and interest in sustainable development and the United Nations. If memory works for me, when I applied, I remember writing some short essays on which of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) I am aligned with and what I have done to contribute to those goals.

That said, they want to see your intrinsic thirst to change the world, and if you really have that drive, even with rejection, you will find that you will automatically develop that motivation to create.

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The first step is to apply!

Applications are evaluated based on the individual's work or involvement, achievements, and interest in sustainable development and the United Nations. If memory works for me, when I applied, I remember writing some short essays on which of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) I am aligned with and what I have done to contribute to those goals.

That said, they want to see your inherent thirst to change the world, and if you really have that drive, even with rejection, you will find that you will automatically develop that motivation to create impact, even without attending Youth. Assembly at the United Nations.

Best of luck!

You can volunteer online through UNV's Online Volunteering Service and help UN agencies and affiliated NGOs working in the developing world.

You can join Voices of Youth, UNICEF's global online community where children and young people learn about their rights; share your views on issues that matter; and discuss and debate humanitarian issues.

You can follow U-Report Global (@UReportGlobal) | Twitter on Twitter and participate in their polls, which focus on issues affecting young people around the world (the results of these polls are given to various UN agencies)

You can apply to attend UNESCO The Yout

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You can volunteer online through UNV's Online Volunteering Service and help UN agencies and affiliated NGOs working in the developing world.

You can join Voices of Youth, UNICEF's global online community where children and young people learn about their rights; share your views on issues that matter; and discuss and debate humanitarian issues.

You can follow U-Report Global (@UReportGlobal) | Twitter on Twitter and participate in their polls, which focus on issues affecting young people around the world (the results of these polls are given to various UN agencies)

You can apply to attend the UNESCO Youth Forum

You can apply to be part of the UNESCO World Heritage Volunteer Initiative

You can follow various UN initiatives on Twitter and Facebook and share status updates with friends.

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