How can I answer "tell me about yourself" intelligently in a college admissions interview? What exactly should I focus on?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Alexzander Frazier



How can I answer "tell me about yourself" intelligently in a college admissions interview? What exactly should I focus on?

Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other do?
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Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other person do? Speak, right? Obviously, what is the point of two people sitting at a table, face to face, with nothing to do or say? And in all likelihood, the first question they will ask you will be: "So, tell me something about yourself."

    The interviewer's intent behind asking you to actually introduce yourself is not all that different.
  • That doesn't mean you won't be judged on what you say here. But it will not be the sort of decisive judgment that the interviewer must make. There is still a long way to go for that to happen yet. So take it easy.
  • Now, think of all the things that really define you and define you in a way that would make a stranger (in this case, a prospective employer) take an interest in you. You could blurt out answers you've read on the internet, but I really don't think that helps you much. You can always ask for more details or explanations in addition to the initial introduction.
  • An answer learned by heart will not allow you to think quickly in that case. Being honest and real, on the other hand, gives you the ability to do so, as it essentially requires you to tell the truth.

    Before the interview, write down all the things that define you: your background, your hobbies, your passions, your activities, your philosophies, your ideologies, your strengths, your weaknesses, your achievements, etc.

    Now, try to figure out which ones will allow a stranger to see an interesting side of you. That is actually what the interviewer hopes to see as well. Try to be unique, diverse and original in the way you express yourself.

    You could say exactly what you read on the internet or from someone else, but saying it in a different way, adding layers to it, can help you stand out.

    For instance:
  • vs.
  • I made it up to exemplify the difference you can make to your answers by using words wisely.
  • DO NOT mention personal details like your family history UNLESS the interviewer asks for it. It takes unnecessary time, it may be a detour for some interviewers, it may go against the policy of some companies, and it is not one of the most important things to mention. Then? What's the point of starting on that note?
    Personally, I like to value the interviewer's time and not mention unnecessary information unless he specifically asks for it.
  • Ideally, it could include:
    1. Your name
    2. Your educational history / achievements, both from college and school
    3. Your most significant work experience / achievement
    4. Your hobbies, with more emphasis on your passion (s). You could support the same with an example perhaps.
    5. The things in life / career that matter most to you
    6. Why are you interviewing for your company?
    7. Try to think of a sentence about yourself to finish. Probably the motto of your life
  • Those are the only cases you can choose from. But I really suggest you be original and think for yourself. Be creative, imaginative, and organized.
  • For each adjective you use for yourself, be prepared with some real-life examples. You will hate if you end up wondering and looking around when asked to justify that you are what you said you are. It can be incredibly embarrassing and can make you a lot more nervous ... and it's just the first question so far!
    So if you think you won't be able to spontaneously recall such anecdotes in the actual interview, keep a few handy (in your memory, of course).
  • And oh yeah, don't overstretch it. Speak quality. Cover the most important / interesting things first. Leave it up to the interviewer if you want to ask for more, take off from something you said, or move on to another question.

You would practice answering the question and unpacking the answer with yourself. Record your natural response to that question, then play it back and see what you focus on, where you put emphasis, and where you pause or get stuck. Pretend to be someone who doesn't know you and is listening to you for the first time. Then unzip it. How do you hear your response? Observe yourself without judgment. Decide what you like and what you don't like. Then do it again. And again. Until it sounds like what you want to convey.

I remember when I started my CAT preparation, I knew that one day I would face the same dilemma. Two questions.

  • Tell me about you?
  • Why MBA?

Right? Trust me when I say this, I have searched and searched for a simple framework or good examples. But you don't find many of them. It was then that I understood. This is your introduction. For a second, forget you're going to an interview. Just think about the things you want a person to know about you and what you would like to know about them.

Keep this as simple and short (1 to 1.5 minutes) as you can. There will be no extraordinary introductio

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I remember when I started my CAT preparation, I knew that one day I would face the same dilemma. Two questions.

  • Tell me about you?
  • Why MBA?

Right? Trust me when I say this, I have searched and searched for a simple framework or good examples. But you don't find many of them. It was then that I understood. This is your introduction. For a second, forget you're going to an interview. Just think about the things you want a person to know about you and what you would like to know about them.

Keep this as simple and short (1 to 1.5 minutes) as you can. There will be no extraordinary presentations, you just need to make a few points about yourself.

So, relax with this question, take a deep breath. Now, I'll get down to business and write my exact introduction that I used in all of my IIM interviews.

"Good morning ma'am / sir. My name is Sanjana Garg. I was born in Faridabad, but have lived most of my life in Gurugram, Haryana, apart from time spent in Bengaluru, due to my father's position. At Gargi College, DU, I major in economics. I participated in various extracurricular and co-curricular activities during my school and college days. As creative director of the economics association, I led a team of 5 people. I also worked as a consultant with 180 degrees of consulting under which we offered consulting services to organizations with social conscience. I believe in giving back to my community and to society, for what it has helped shape me into. To fulfill this wish, I performed 120 hours of community service with the National Social Service Scheme and enrolled in various NGOs. My team and I were also in the top 5 finalists for Project Pathfinder, a research-based competition. My hobbies are reading books, dancing, I'm a trained kathak dancer and painting.

Finally, I would like to say that I am a firm believer in manual work, compassion and perseverance to be able to cross the biggest barriers and I try to instill them in myself.

In general he speaks with a smile, I always say this. It is extremely important. It's always such small things that can make or break your interview. Don't sound like you've mugged the answer, give the proper breaks in between.

Special tip: write what you write, you must know some incidents of them. So, remind yourself of the incidents of, let's stop what you did, how you showed leadership, when you failed, for every society or job you mention.

Finally, make some points that will surely be different and will interest you. You do not have them? You must :). When I started writing, I didn't even know it. Introspect and give it adequate time.

I hope I have been able to answer your questions.

If so, vote up :)

This is the answer to this question for each and every field ...

During my preparation session, I ask, "Tell me about yourself" and write down the essence of your answer. It usually sounds like this ...

I have been in management for 20 years. I have worked in Fortune 100 companies and have been successful in team building and leadership. I am focused on the non-profit segment because it is aligned with my personal goals ...

Taking this answer and superimposing it onto your world, it usually sounds like this ...

I am a senior at Central High School. I have a 4.2 GPA and have taken 8 AP courses during my high school years. I to

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This is the answer to this question for each and every field ...

During my preparation session, I ask, "Tell me about yourself" and write down the essence of your answer. It usually sounds like this ...

I have been in management for 20 years. I have worked in Fortune 100 companies and have been successful in team building and leadership. I am focused on the non-profit segment because it is aligned with my personal goals ...

Taking this answer and superimposing it onto your world, it usually sounds like this ...

I am a senior at Central High School. I have a 4.2 GPA and have taken 8 AP courses during my high school years. I am also a college basketball player with letters. I am interested in attending Main University for its Spanish program ...

Then I ask the questions: “How did you get to this place where you are right now? How did you know you wanted to work for a non-profit organization? What happened in your life to get you here? "And this is what my 20-year-old executive says ...

When I graduated from high school, I joined the police force, believe it or not. I really wanted to serve the community. After a few years, I left the force and started working for the city on its Community Outreach Program. That led to a job with American companies running a community public relations program. 20 years later, I am Vice President of Public Relations. And now I am ready to put all my experience at the service of the community again for this non-profit company.

THAT is the answer to Tell me about yourself.

Overlaying that onto your world, this is a high school sophomore's response to Tell me about yourself ...

Look, I have pimples. And I have read that pimples can be genetic. My dad never had pimples. My mom did it when she was a child. And I am determined to find out how grains are passed on to the next generation. I am obsessed with genetics. I see someone with green eyes and I want to meet the parents. I have over 1,500 people connected to our family tree. I toured the Ancestry.com office and met with scientists, researchers, etc. I want to study genetics at a university with a massive research arm and strong academics. That is why I am here. I want to study genetics here.

Tell me about yourself is a story. Your story that unites the reasons that explain why you are here, right now, in this interview.

All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to connect with the interviewer.

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All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to build a connection with the interviewer, the company, and the future growth of all parties involved. This is an opportunity to show that you can fit perfectly into the culture. Show that it is interesting. Show your skills.

In all the interviews I have attended, the questions begin with what I mentioned in the part about me.

If you're cooler, make sure everything you've done differently from other candidates shows up at this point.

You can start on the lines of ...

Hi there. I am _____ and I am here as a candidate for position ____ on your team. I will finish my B.XX. on _____ for June 2018. As part of my course, I have worked on a project where we build _____ using ___ and ____. It was a great learning experience both technically and socially, as we had to balance the distribution of work within the team and continually seek guidance from professors and industry experts.

This is the point where you start to highlight your skills and accomplishments.

Other than this, I have represented my colleges in ______ and won the award. I also trained in ______. Apart from these, I usually spend my weekends working at ______ (or playing something, or some volunteer activities). Last week I was on a 50km bike ride which was a great test of strength and endurance.

Finish by pointing out where you are and where you want to go further.

That is all I can share. I am looking for an entry level position at _______ that can give a great start to my career. I will be happy to answer any questions you have.

Make sure this part of the interview is never impromptu. In the meantime, it shouldn't seem overly rehearsed either. You should already have a list of 100 things to share in your mind, of which 10-20 can be shared in the interview depending on the situation.

Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your answer should detail

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Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your response should detail experiences relevant to the position you are applying for and highlight you as the perfect candidate. So depending on how you answer, it will help the interviewer decide what to ask next. This is your chance to make a lasting first impression.

If you think this question is complicated, you are not alone. As you prepare for the answer, remember that the key part here is not only describing your personal life, but also your professional one. On that basis, I listed a few points here in two categories

Be sure to give professional and relevant answers to the position for which you are applying. This way you can respond. See the following example for newborns:

  • Hello, my name is Lily Taylor. I am from New Delhi / I am from New Delhi but currently I live in Mumbai.
  • I finished my studies from SND High School in 2015.
  • I graduated from NIT University in 2021 with a BE in Computer Science and Engineering / I completed BE in Computer Science and Engineering from NIT University in 2021.
  • Completed graduation with 87% / Maintained a GPA of 6.
  • As a computer science student, I am passionate about learning new programming languages ​​and am currently good at the Java programming language. During my graduation, I was part of a student-initiated group where we conducted workshops for other students on innovations in the computer industry.
  • In my spare time / free time I like to read books and play cricket.
  • As I come to my family, there are 4 members including me. My father is a teacher and my mother is a housewife. My little brother just showed up in the 12th grade.
  • Well, I don't have any real life work experience, but now I am looking forward to taking advantage of all that I learned and gaining practical experience.
  • Thank you for giving me the opportunity to introduce myself.

If you have experience, you should focus more on explaining past experience effectively because that is what the interviewer is looking for. If you want to check the example to get an experienced one and some other details on how to prepare an answer, you can watch my video where I provided some other details.

So these two examples are simple, short but the most effective at the same time. Hope this is helpful to you at least to leave a lasting first impression.

I still don't have work experience .............. What should I say if they ask me 'tell me about yourself'?

When planning to apply for a specific position, identify the specific job requirements and personal qualities mentioned in the advertisement and then be prepared to give examples of how you have used those same skills in different situations in your life activities. An example could be "time management". “I had a part-time position while attending college full-time and managed to maintain a…. GPA without ever missing a day of work and receiving excellent work performance grades. "

If you want t

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I still don't have work experience .............. What should I say if they ask me 'tell me about yourself'?

When planning to apply for a specific position, identify the specific job requirements and personal qualities mentioned in the advertisement and then be prepared to give examples of how you have used those same skills in different situations in your life activities. An example could be "time management". “I had a part-time position while attending college full-time and managed to maintain a…. GPA without ever missing a day of work and receiving excellent work performance grades. "

If you want to prepare for this question but don't have a specific job in mind yet, do two searches, one of the job descriptions you are interested in, and then search for job postings similar to the ones you are interested in. Identify the common skills and qualities required. Then list each one and write down examples of using similar skills in activities in your life. Illustrate / describe how you have used those same skills or demonstrated that you have those qualities and the positive results.

People who have no real "on the job" experience tend to "sell themselves low" (don't give themselves enough credit) for the things they need to do just to get on with life. Students need to learn time management skills to be successful. Volunteer work, college positions, or church activities all require interpersonal skills, planning, organizing, etc. Describe those activities and the results as if they were your job.

These are all the things you can mention in a cover letter or put on a resume.

Therefore, never feel like you are "inexperienced." You certainly have experience using the same kinds of skills needed on the job. They just haven't paid you yet for them in a work situation.

I feel like a non-native speaker of English due to two typos and the possibility of a grammatical improvement in the question.

Unless you are an art student, it will not be a “collage” interview; you misspelled 'would'; and "a sample response" would be better written as "a sample response".

I point out these oversights, as you don't want to make such mistakes during the interview itself. It does; however, it tends to show that you are not attentive to details in this context, and the urgency expressed indicates that you have waited longer than necessary to prepare for this opportunity. Don't show those chara

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I feel like a non-native speaker of English due to two typos and the possibility of a grammatical improvement in the question.

Unless you are an art student, it will not be a “collage” interview; you misspelled 'would'; and "a sample response" would be better written as "a sample response".

I point out these oversights, as you don't want to make such mistakes during the interview itself. It does; however, it tends to show that you are not attentive to details in this context, and the urgency expressed indicates that you have waited longer than necessary to prepare for this opportunity. Do not demonstrate those characteristics in the interview process ...

When admissions folks ask these questions (and YOU should be able to do it comfortably, so practice a bit and not a few minutes before the interview!), They are asking you to summarize how you see yourself as a noteworthy human , how your experiences to date have shaped your aspirations and ambitions for the future, and where do you see that vision of yourself going to college and what you think a great college experience (offered by BBA) will allow you to offer to the world .

I can't put those words in your mouth, but you should be able to do this by now if you're going to college. If you can't, you may want to wait until you can. Other than that, I would recommend an honest sincerity.

Tell them what brought you to this point, why you want to go to their school, and what will allow you to contribute to the world having had their education. It definitely shouldn't be something you can't believe in. You must mean it.

Be confident in yourself and what you want (as long as you're not greedy; if you're greedy, flip the positives and re-examine your motives later).

Best luck to you.

There can't be a template for this I guess.

I follow the following template in every interview and it has always worked for me. Whichever part is not applicable to you, they can cross it out.

PFB the template, followed by my answer version in the same template.

“First of all, thanks for the opportunity, I am from xxxx, from a family of x, my father is xxxx, my mother is xxxx, I did my degree in xxxx, I did my postgraduate degree in xxxx, I worked with xxxx in the xxxx profile, while at work xxxx yyyy zzzz were my key responsibilities, I believe in the xxxx philosophy. I value xxxx more, my hobbies are xxxx. That's ab

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There can't be a template for this I guess.

I follow the following template in every interview and it has always worked for me. Whichever part is not applicable to you, they can cross it out.

PFB the template, followed by my answer version in the same template.

“First of all, thanks for the opportunity, I am from xxxx, from a family of x, my father is xxxx, my mother is xxxx, I did my degree in xxxx, I did my postgraduate degree in xxxx, I worked with xxxx in the xxxx profile, while at work xxxx yyyy zzzz were my key responsibilities, I believe in the xxxx philosophy. I value xxxx more, my hobbies are xxxx. That is a short summary of myself. If I can give you more details about something, I will "

“First of all, thank you for the opportunity, I am from Chennai, from a family of 4, my father is a former military man, now retired, after working in logistics after his service. My mother is a stay at home mom, I recently got married and my wife works with Amazon. I did my computer science engineering and my MBA in marketing. Post MBA I worked with Blue Star on the marketing profile, where I handled various ATL and BTL activities. I believe it takes a happy, motivated employee to create a happy customer. I value work-life balance more. My hobbies are watching movies and actively participating in one sport or another. That is a short summary of myself. If I can give you more details about something, I will "

Talking about yourself should be the easiest thing to do.

After all, who knows you better than you?

But for some strange reason, almost all interviewers can agree that giving a good answer to the question "Tell me about yourself" during a job interview can be one of the most difficult and stressful things to do.

Common mistakes we make in most of the interview when they asked that they tell me about you.

  1. Regurgitate your cover letter and resume. It is imp but not in this question.
  2. Telling the story of his life. Look, it's nice to share something about your personality, but save it for later.
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Talking about yourself should be the easiest thing to do.

After all, who knows you better than you?

But for some strange reason, almost all interviewers can agree that giving a good answer to the question "Tell me about yourself" during a job interview can be one of the most difficult and stressful things to do.

Common mistakes we make in most of the interview when they asked that they tell me about you.

  1. Regurgitate your cover letter and resume. It is imp but not in this question.
  2. Telling the story of his life. Look, it's nice to share something about your personality, but save it for after you get hired.
  3. "Well, what do you want to know?" Congratulations. You just lost your job. Why? Because they will think that you are not prepared for an unstructured response.

Well now you know what not to do, so what do you have to answer? Here it is;

1. Tell them your name.

2. Tell them how old you are and where you are from.

3. Tell them when you left school (or if you are still there, say I will graduate from 2 ***)

4. Tell them what you have been working on in the past "no matter how many months / years"

5. Tell them what your long-term goals and plans are.

6. Mention some hobbies and interests (for example, swimming, surfing, diving, traveling, spending time with family, etc.) Just remember a few! Keep a secret for the future after you are hired. : ')

I hope it helps you. :)

Like this.

Hi there. My name is XYZ. I am originally from 'city' where I received my initial 'school' education ... but then I moved to 'second city' where I attended university in 'name of university' and did my bachelor's degree in 'field'.

I always had an interest in the 'field' so I chose to intern / work on 'company name' in the 'field related department'. I learned how 'what you learned where you worked' and that has helped me acquire a particular skill set that I think would be valuable in this company.

I have also been involved in sports, debating, writing and was part of the 'abc club in college where

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Like this.

Hi there. My name is XYZ. I am originally from 'city' where I received my initial 'school' education ... but then I moved to 'second city' where I attended university in 'name of university' and did my bachelor's degree in 'field'.

I always had an interest in the 'field' so I chose to intern / work on 'company name' in the 'field related department'. I learned how 'what you learned where you worked' and that has helped me acquire a particular skill set that I think would be valuable in this company.

I have also been involved in sports, debating, writing and was part of the 'abc club at the university where I was responsible for organizing the' event '.
........

I can go on and on with this, but all you need to know is that in interviews ... recruiters are looking for:
1. Focus on a particular field
2. Your communication skills and how you present yourself and your capabilities
3 Confidence and ability to take initiative / leadership.

*** Basically ... the ability to clearly express your thoughts and justify your education and experience.

"Tell me about you?" I think this is the most crucial question in an interview. Usually the first question, this question sets the sails for an interview. That means that, depending on your answer to this question, the interviewer frames your next questions. Therefore, this question is an opportunity for you to direct the interviewer to their areas of strength. Therefore, your answer to this question should try to highlight your achievements / strengths in a positive way to the interviewer.

This question is also an opportunity to create a good first impression. Recruiters spend hours during t

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"Tell me about you?" I think this is the most crucial question in an interview. Usually the first question, this question sets the sails for an interview. That means that, depending on your answer to this question, the interviewer frames your next questions. Therefore, this question is an opportunity for you to direct the interviewer to their areas of strength. Therefore, your answer to this question should try to highlight your achievements / strengths in a positive way to the interviewer.

This question is also an opportunity to create a good first impression. Recruiters spend hours during the recruiting cycle. They end up hearing the same soft responses to their questions from most of the participants. And that is why this question gives you the opportunity to differentiate yourself from others. So, kindly avoid the cliches! It doesn't hurt to be cliché, but it is always advantageous to be creative (although not in an eccentric way). So, use this question to show your creativity. It will keep them hooked on you.

Last but not least, have a smile on your face as you answer this question.

Use these ingredients in your interviews to frame a decent answer.

I hope this helps!

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