How can employers tell when a job applicant is making up or making up an answer in a behavioral interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Dylan Fernandez



How can employers tell when a job applicant is making up or making up an answer in a behavioral interview?

The following signs can be observed in such a person while fabricating responses in an interview:

  1. Avoid eye contact while responding.
  2. You tend to give very long answers that may not be particularly related to the questions asked ... just to divert the interviewer's attention.
  3. The nervousness is clearly visible in his body language.
  4. Struggle to speak clearly. .stammers, does a lot of uhh .., ummm ... etc. He is always trying to formulate sentences in a particular way just to make sure they have the exact meaning in the way that he wants to mean.
  5. You start to sweat when asked questions ... again a sign of nervousness.
  6. You can make a big claim on your top achievements and great feats that you have done before. .but when the interviewer tries to go into details and asks probing questions about them. So he makes an effort to answer them.

A good experienced interviewer is known to be a good judge of a person. So you will definitely look for the above points and be able to detect the falsehood of the candidate.

All the answers I've seen so far are pretty spot on, but none seem to have the right perspective.

You don't really owe your company anything unless you feel some kind of deep loyalty towards it ... even then ... Ethically and professionally (and perhaps depending on company policies or the labor laws of the state or country in which may you live), yes, you must inform your current employer that you are interviewing. However, chances are, as everyone has said, reality is pretty much the only downside for you.

In my first job outside of college, after 2 years I decided to join a

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All the answers I've seen so far are pretty spot on, but none seem to have the right perspective.

You don't really owe your company anything unless you feel some kind of deep loyalty towards it ... even then ... Ethically and professionally (and perhaps depending on company policies or the labor laws of the state or country in which may you live), yes, you must inform your current employer that you are interviewing. However, chances are, as everyone has said, reality is pretty much the only downside for you.

In my first job after college, after 2 years I decided to join another company and gave my current boss a 2 week professional notice (I had a job offer in hand). I also told him the company I would be joining. His boss (who was my boss not long before) was the main reason I decided to leave (along with what he thought were better opportunities). My boss said it was okay to finish what I could in that 2 week time.

A couple of days later, my boss's boss caught me after hours on my way home to my family and practically demanded that I talk to him (he never actually spoke to me after being promoted). I didn't like the guy and I guess it showed when I told him that if he wanted to know any details, he could go talk to my boss and get whatever information he wanted. The next day they told me to clean my desk because they were going to escort me out of the building right away (I was still getting my 2 weeks pay). The reason given? The company I was going to was considered a direct competitor (not really true ... the company I was leaving was a computer systems company and the company I was going to was practically semiconductor ... in fact , the company I was in was a client of the company I was going to ... although, that was not my connection). It was interesting because that was not the case when I gave my notice a few days before. I suspect I pissed off my boss's boss more than I realized. At the time, I didn't care.

So, moral of the story? Don't put yourself in a lose-lose position that you have no control over if you don't have to. In times like this, you never really know who will remain polite and professional under the circumstances or who will resent your decision and be personally affected to the point of retaliation against you.

Ask yourself what you can gain by being so "frank" with your current employer. If you know that you have a really great and trusting relationship with your boss and he / she is willing to be a reference for you (and you may need him / her for that), then that risk might be worth taking. However, always keep in mind that your immediate boss is most likely not the only one who knows your intentions. And that could complicate your life (and your career).

Good luck…..

"Work hard, play hard."

This is a code for "You'll break your ass even on Hawaiian shirt day."

Expect to work perpetually understaffed with strong peer pressure to attend company picnics on the weekends.

Work hard, play hard = no time for you.


OTHER RED FLAGS TO LOOK FOR

Dust on diamonds. Tricks like bikes, Xbox, ping pong tables, weird collaboration areas ... and they're all covered in dust.

The Gestapo. They preach it. They teach it. They put worship in culture. Beware of the hive mind where people may look different but everyone thinks the same. Expect to be force-fed Kool-Aid, whatever

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"Work hard, play hard."

This is a code for "You'll break your ass even on Hawaiian shirt day."

Expect to work perpetually understaffed with strong peer pressure to attend company picnics on the weekends.

Work hard, play hard = no time for you.


OTHER RED FLAGS TO LOOK FOR

Dust on diamonds. Tricks like bikes, Xbox, ping pong tables, weird collaboration areas ... and they're all covered in dust.

The Gestapo. They preach it. They teach it. They put worship in culture. Beware of the hive mind where people may look different but everyone thinks the same. Expect to be force-fed the Kool-Aid, do what they tell you, don't ask questions, and don't let feelings get in the way of pretending you love your job.

Dinners called. Strange hours. Receive responses by email on Tuesday nights or sunny Sunday afternoons. If they are communicating with you when the rest of the world is living their life, chances are you are about to give up on yours. Yes, the world is connected. Yes, sometimes after hours emails make sense. But be the judge ... and pay attention.

Robots. Heavy use of office jargon and sanitized language means the company has been hijacked by climbers and corporate drones. Look for fancy and cryptic words to describe easy things. I once heard someone describe hiring a new employee: "We are looking to add a new asset this quarter." Seriously? Who talks like that? Nobody interesting, that's who.

The Overlord. Young, modern workers led by an older man who was breathing heavily. Expect it to last only as long as your youth lasts ... which means 27 years or less. At first, you might think that you are part of a secret. But as you get older and more expensive, you have the feeling that any day could be your last ... and it's true. They will be taking notes on every mistake, no matter how insignificant it is. And the day before your grandmother's funeral, you will get the notice.

The Quitter. The person you are replacing "just quit." People don't just give up money unless things are really bad. Quitting means not qualifying for unemployment compensation. And they were willing to risk spending their savings. Unless your interviewer has a solid reason and you need to ask, think twice before taking the leap.

NASA interviews. "Tell me about a time when ..." If your interview is more like a checklist for a shuttle launch, it is probably a micromanaged environment. Be on the lookout for over-prepared, time-critical interviews with a tight structure and ready-made question lists. Well done job interviews should take a natural conversation course.

I'm new! It's new! They are all new! Unless they are growing, and you can tell from recent office changes and new furniture and equipment, they probably have a high turnover. You will be new until you are unemployed.


PS Like most red flags, these are not hard and fast rules. These are simply things to keep in mind.

Like many tips, follow your instincts, it is usually correct.

I interviewed over 20,000 in my career and hired over 2,000.

What you didn't say in your question is just as important as what you said.

What you didn't say is how long it has been since the interview. He also did not say if he asked when they would contact you.

You should always ask what the next steps will be and when. That way, when the employer will contact you. And it gives you the ability to call the employer if / when that deadline passes.

Given the way you asked your question and assuming a reasonable amount of time has passed (a week or more)

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I interviewed over 20,000 in my career and hired over 2,000.

What you didn't say in your question is just as important as what you said.

What you didn't say is how long it has been since the interview. He also did not say if he asked when they would contact you.

You should always ask what the next steps will be and when. That way, when the employer will contact you. And it gives you the ability to call the employer if / when that deadline passes.

Given the way you asked your question and assuming a reasonable amount of time has passed (a week or more), it would be reasonable for you to contact your primary contact (by phone, not email). “You said that you would contact me when you made your final decision. Can you tell me the timeframe for that decision? And, if you are bold enough to do so, also ask the following: "Where am I currently in the ranking of consideration for the position?" You may not get the answer you want, but you have to be honest. number 1 or something else like waffles, hemming, etc., in which case, at best, you're not second to anyone.

There are many reasons an employer may delay a hiring decision, some of which have nothing to do specifically with you: 1) internal candidates being considered; 2) pending staff changes / restructuring; 3) pending budget changes; 4) external candidates who have not yet scheduled; 5) offer made to someone else, but you are the endorsement; 6) Hiring for this position is not as high a priority as other positions or other businesses, etc. Therefore, the process, unfortunately, can take weeks and even months. The "second place to no one" scenario can be particularly frustrating, as technically you are the best candidate for the place if no one better shows up.

Your best remedy for the no action response is to have other options to force a response. If / when you have an offer from another employer, you can call the schedule of the employer who, until then, has not been willing to make a decision. Let them know you have another offer. Therefore, you may have to consider two offers when a week before you had none.

To learn more about the interview process, visit The Road to Interview Success on CollegeGrad.com.

PS: It may be that the decision has already been made and you have not. Some recruiters and hiring managers aren't particularly adept at breaking bad news, so they avoid it entirely. Bad business manners, but it happens. This is why you need to follow through to close the loop with every opportunity.

I would read it negative.

It may well be the classic parting line in any interview, but you should keep in mind that they must be equally motivated to keep you interested in working there.

The recession is over, folks. Especially in low-paying jobs.

We all know they are interviewing other candidates, but when you have a good card game and they tell you (rudely) that they are still seeing 9-10 more, obviously not counting the ones they already met, then your odds are in the single digits.

And it would leave a bad taste in anyone's mouth.

We can speculate all we want about why

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I would read it negative.

It may well be the classic parting line in any interview, but you should keep in mind that they must be equally motivated to keep you interested in working there.

The recession is over, folks. Especially in low-paying jobs.

We all know they are interviewing other candidates, but when you have a good card game and they tell you (rudely) that they are still seeing 9-10 more, obviously not counting the ones they already met, then your odds are in the single digits.

And it would leave a bad taste in anyone's mouth.

We can speculate all we want as to why they quantify the odds, and it may be the truth, but for heaven's sake, if you're really interested, make people feel valued.

And in this case, they did not.

There is no point in calling your references with probabilities like these, even when the interviewer knows some of them. Actually, you have to act pretty quickly. Frankly, I don't want to waste my reference time. The thing is, they would probably call you very soon. A decision must be made immediately.

I sent an e-mail:

“It was a pleasure meeting you and X yesterday. You have a wonderful (store, department, company) and my Y years of experience in the field would probably be a good fit.

As you mentioned yesterday, you are still interviewing 9-10 other candidates. Although you are aware of some of my references, I don't think it is appropriate at this time to alert you to my application here. I must respectfully withdraw my application. "

This way, the references they know won't be bothered by firms that don't show great respect for their candidates.

My opinion, and I stand by it.

In a behavioral interview, the company asks about your past work encounters to see if you have what it takes for the job. Behavioral interview directions focus on how you previously dealt with different work circumstances. Your reaction will reveal your skills, abilities and identity.

Here are some of the common questions asked in the behavioral job interview:

  • Give an example of a time when you used logic to solve a problem.
  • Give an example of a goal you achieved and tell me how you achieved it.
  • Give an example of a goal you did not meet and how you achieved it.
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In a behavioral interview, the company asks about your past work encounters to see if you have what it takes for the job. Behavioral interview directions focus on how you previously dealt with different work circumstances. Your reaction will reveal your skills, abilities and identity.

Here are some of the common questions asked in the behavioral job interview:

  • Give an example of a time when you used logic to solve a problem.
  • Give an example of a goal you achieved and tell me how you achieved it.
  • Give an example of a goal you did not meet and how you managed it.
  • Describe a stressful situation at work and how you handled it.
  • Tell me how you worked effectively under pressure.
  • How do you handle a challenge?
  • Have you been in a situation where you didn't have enough work to do?
  • Have you ever made a mistake? How did you handle it?
  • Describe a decision you made that was not popular and how you handled its implementation.
  • Have you ever made a risky decision? Why? How did you handle it?
  • Have you ever put off making a decision? Why?
  • Have you ever dealt with a company policy that you did not agree with? How?
  • Have you gone beyond the call of duty? If so, how?
  • When you worked on multiple projects, how did you prioritize?
  • How did you manage to meet a tight deadline?
  • Give an example of how you set goals and achieve them.
  • Have you ever failed to meet your goals? Why?
  • What do you do when your schedule is interrupted? Give an example of how you handle it.
  • Have you had to convince a team to work on a project that they are not enthusiastic about? How did you do it?
  • Give an example of how you have worked as a team.
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a co-worker? How?
  • What do you do if you disagree with a co-worker?
  • Share an example of how you were able to motivate employees or co-workers.
  • Do you hear Give an example of when you did or did not listen.
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a supervisor? How?
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with another department? How?
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a customer or supplier? How?
  • What do you do if you disagree with your boss?

There are other questions too. However, these questions can go a long way toward deciphering the behavioral interview.

I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is
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I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is problematic because it is not clear that the interviewer is nicer to candidates who are doing well. It certainly wasn't. If anything, I was nicer to the candidates who were performing worse, because I felt bad for them.
  2. Difficulty / ease in solving problems (for technical / consulting roles / etc.). The problem with this is that it is not really about how many problems you have to solve a problem; it's about how many problems you have * relative * to other candidates. And, of course, you don't know how other candidates fared.


The only thing that could be an indicator is if:

  1. Good performance The interviewer is making a clear hard sell. And even then ... It is beneficial for you to think well of the company, even if you are rejected.
  2. Poor performance You have serious problems with a question, such as a complete and total freeze. That could put you squarely on the bottom of candidates even on a tough problem.


Basically, attempts to guess its performance will be slightly more accurate than random guesses. It is better to be optimistic and wait to find out what happened.

It is nothing unusual.

As you can see from other questions and answers here on Quora, some job openings attract hundreds of candidates. The online submission process makes it easy (perhaps too easy) for people to apply for many positions.

If I can take my resume and just shoot it into dozens of positions, why not? Won't that improve my chances of getting a job? No.

Well, the reason for not submitting generic resumes in bulk is that automated applicant tracking systems (ATS) quickly remove resumes that do not meet the requirements of the position. The computer ensures that your resume doesn't even reach a human and is wasted

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It is nothing unusual.

As you can see from other questions and answers here on Quora, some job openings attract hundreds of candidates. The online submission process makes it easy (perhaps too easy) for people to apply for many positions.

If I can take my resume and just shoot it into dozens of positions, why not? Won't that improve my chances of getting a job? No.

Well, the reason for not submitting generic resumes in bulk is that automated applicant tracking systems (ATS) quickly remove resumes that do not meet the requirements of the position. The computer ensures that your resume doesn't even reach a human and waste your time. For smaller companies like mine, the human reader quickly evaluates which resumes meet the basic criteria. The other 80% + falls into the trash. No response to requester.

Is that fair?

It has nothing to do with justice. It is a business necessity to effectively manage the time of the resume reader (HR or hiring manager). The submitter didn't take the time to make sure he really qualified for the position and adapted his resume to show his fit. The reader is not required to give the candidate more than the 5-10 seconds it takes to see the obvious mismatch and toss the resume aside.

Your question is too vague in one respect. Is the candidate one of the hundreds who blindly submitted a generic resume via email or an online system? Or were they one of the top 2-3 candidates interviewed for the position? If it is the first, no response should be expected. In the latter case, virtually any reputable HR department would inform all interviewed candidates of the outcome of the interview, offer or no offer.

Simply, the answer is time. Many employers don't have the time to follow up on every candidate, especially if they interviewed many candidates.
In fact, I've seen candidates lower their chances of being hired by following up too often in situations like this, but it seems like you did the right thing by sending a courteous and courteous follow-up.
They may have already hired a very competitive candidate. However, it's worth calling your references to see what kind of conversations they had with the employer and that might give you more information.

First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

"I see you

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First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

“I see that you need _______, and in my experience doing _________ I was able to achieve _________ for a recent employer. "

If you've really delved deeper, maybe you'll also talk about your core values. And show how you can align with them and help them achieve their goals.

It is a vague answer because the interviewer asks a vague question.

If you ask me, the best job interview responses are the ones where you control the flow of the discussion. Is that possible? If much. But you need to be really smart; well prepared and with a great sense of anticipation to be able to control the narrative.

You can prepare your resume and responses in ways that are compelling enough to direct interviewers to your strengths, abilities, experience, etc. key, and make them believe that you are the best candidate for the job.

I wish you good luck.

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