How can an Indian get a job in New Zealand?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Alexia Knowles



How can an Indian get a job in New Zealand?

Like everyone else, check the websites to find suitable job openings, apply, and if you're lucky, get an interview. Of course, this applies only to people, Indian or not, if you are in the country and have a work permit. If not, it will get complicated. It is good that you approach one of the certified immigration agents for help. It is a challenge to find a job in New Zealand from India, without a visa. It's not that New Zealand has enough trained people and doesn't need them from abroad. It's the opposite.

Some small towns like Nelson have great difficulty finding skilled people

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Like everyone else, check the websites to find suitable job openings, apply, and if you're lucky, get an interview. Of course, this applies only to people, Indian or not, if you are in the country and have a work permit. If not, it will get complicated. It is good that you approach one of the certified immigration agents for help. It is a challenge to find a job in New Zealand from India, without a visa. It's not that New Zealand has enough trained people and doesn't need them from abroad. It's the opposite.

Some small towns like Nelson are struggling a lot to find skilled people for jobs. The biggest problem is the immigration requirements to hire someone from abroad without a visa.

Your employer has to go the extra mile with NZ immigration to get you a visa if they decide to offer you a job. They first have to advertise the job in New Zealand and show that they did not find a suitable candidate in the local market and are therefore offering you a job. It is not impossible, but it takes time and effort for your employer to complete the process. So unless you possess some exceptional skills and are desperate enough to hire him, it is not easy.

Normally the route to New Zealand would be to be in an occupation with a shortage of skills, such as medicine or engineering, however many professional associations in New Zealand are highly suspicious of Indian professional qualifications, such as medical degrees, so it is likely you find, although you can get By entering the country with this skill, you cannot work in this profession without 'retraining' according to the local standard (which you may also find lower than what you used to).

I shared a flat for a year with a fully qualified German anesthesiaologist who was paid as a hospital registrar because the NZMC would not accept his p

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Normally the route to New Zealand would be to be in an occupation with a shortage of skills, such as medicine or engineering, however many professional associations in New Zealand are highly suspicious of Indian professional qualifications, such as medical degrees, so it is likely you find, although you can get By entering the country with this skill, you cannot work in this profession without 'retraining' according to the local standard (which you may also find lower than what you used to).

I shared a flat for a year with a fully qualified German anesthesiaologist who was paid as a hospital registrar because the NZMC would not accept his graduate degree.

There's a joke in Auckland ... what's the quickest way to see a doctor ... take a taxi at the airport!

If you are not even on this skill list then it will be an even tougher fight.

Employers do not give jobs by nationality, it would be better if you indicate your qualifications, experience and skills that you possess. Then it will be easy for you to answer your question.

Normally, there must be a skills shortage in New Zealand when you apply for a PR visa or some employer needs to sponsor you and get a visa.

You need to search the immigration department website and find out if there are few skills you possess and any immigration agent will have this information as well.

Like everyone else, check the websites for suitable job openings, apply, and if you're lucky, get an interview.

This, of course, applies only to people, Indian or not, if you are in the country and have a work permit.

If not, it will get complicated, I suggest you reach out to one of the certified immigration agents for help.

I wish you all the best, here is a great little country.

I'm pretty sure there are many different job opportunities in New Zealand. I was looking for mine using the Jobs in New Zealand website where there are many different interesting job opportunities.

There may be no jobs or interviews on ethnicity. however, if your right or wrong ethnicity influences this procedure, and to be perfectly frank, Indians are not highly regarded in New Zealand.

There are two interpretations of this question. (1) How much competition is there for jobs available in New Zealand. (2) How internationally competitive the New Zealand market is for job seekers.

The answer to both depends on the industry and the level of work within the industry. In general, the answer to (2) is "not very competitive". Wages are lower compared to too many developed countries, the cost of living (especially housing, rented or owned and food) is higher, and the level of benefits is not as good. Some of these are offset by government-backed benefits (for example, health care), but if

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There are two interpretations of this question. (1) How much competition is there for jobs available in New Zealand. (2) How internationally competitive the New Zealand market is for job seekers.

The answer to both depends on the industry and the level of work within the industry. In general, the answer to (2) is "not very competitive". Wages are lower compared to too many developed countries, the cost of living (especially housing, rented or owned and food) is higher, and the level of benefits is not as good. Some of these are offset by government-backed benefits (for example, health care), but if you are a top earner or top performer, these will not make up the shortfall.

With respect to (1), at entry-level and mid-level positions in most industries, competition is significant. There are fewer jobs and many applicants. It is a small place and there are not many employers. That means your salary will be reduced (if you are coming from a western country you will not be able to compete on salary terms with workers from India or China, for example - this would normally not be a problem if New Zealand employers understood or cared about value. However, many of the jobs in the tech industry exist simply to meet the requirements of funding received from the government. Yes, my friend, government fingers on private companies are never a good idea. To a linguistically illiterate worker and technically mediocre that is financially flexible).

There is some good news. For some. In senior positions there is a genuine shortage, and it can be compensated internationally. The competition is also less, there are simply not that many candidates. On the other hand, these are quite difficult to come by and are also contaminated by the government. they financed night flight operations that sought to tick boxes. These will pay you well, but only for a short time. If you are looking for high-level positions, be sure to consider the history of the organization. How long has it been around, what is its market and what percentage of that market does it have. Better yet, make sure the market served is outside of New Zealand. You can probably get it right in that case.

Be careful ... The New Zealand government's "Shortage List" is almost useless. It does not represent (and I suspect has never represented) the actual market condition. As much as we have been told that there is a shortage, and the INZ makes the case for granting PR to migrants and the like on that basis, in practice this shortage does not materialize. Certainly not in the employer's attitude towards migrant labor.

How do I know all this? All I can say is that this is an informed position formed over 5 years in this country. I cannot give you details, I remain anonymous for very good reasons.

I have lived the first half of my life in India and the second half in New Zealand.

When I arrived here three decades ago, the first thing that struck me was the way they treated you. Just like a friend, a neighbor, a newcomer, a versatile person who wants to embed himself in this culture and be part of this social structure. That feeling has not gone away.

I came with all the emotional and financial baggage that most Indians carry as gifts. Very soon these luggage dissipated and disappeared. I found that hard work, honest and clean treatment, an informal friendly approach was better than race protocol, c

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I have lived the first half of my life in India and the second half in New Zealand.

When I arrived here three decades ago, the first thing that struck me was the way they treated you. Just like a friend, a neighbor, a newcomer, a versatile person who wants to embed himself in this culture and be part of this social structure. That feeling has not gone away.

I came with all the emotional and financial baggage that most Indians carry as gifts. Very soon these luggage dissipated and disappeared. I found that hard work, clean and honest treatment, an informal friendly approach was better than the protocol of race, color and "keeping up with the Joneses" then prevalent in India. Not everything was milk and honey in the early years. There were some Kiwis who viewed Indian businessmen as sneaky and aggressive. In those days, not many Indians moved to rural areas, so we stuck out like sore thumbs. In the larger city, more Indians settled and there were fewer problems. The behavior of a small town persisted for some time, but it is definitely not that pronounced now.

In the life of the city we find Indians like us mixed very well. Although most worked corner dairies and menial jobs, they worked harder than the rest. By the end of the first decade, Indian students were rapidly rising to the top grades, entering scholarship programs in large numbers, reaching middle management, and enjoying all the facilities that NZ had to offer. The Indians began to be visible on the golf course, in swimming pools, on the beach, in fishing, in boats, in sports. education, university. fashion and food.

The Indians of India quickly differentiated themselves from other brands of Indians. There were Indians from Fiji, Malaysians, Singaporeans, Mauritians, British, Jamaicans, West Indians, South Americans, and others from smaller countries. However, the Indian of India (Indian-Indian!) Stood out as more qualified and cosmopolitan.

As more Indians arrived, the "culture of acceptance" became friendlier than before. There were no threats, no discord and it was a much better place to be.

Now, 3 decades later, it is a changed environment. You see Indians everywhere. In politics, sports, education, computing, senior management, dairy farming, forestry, fishing, teaching, commerce, manufacturing, tourism, worship, and cultural festivals. Diwali has become a major attraction and just as good as the Christmas celebrations. Indian costumes and designs are everywhere. Indian food is everywhere too. Three decades ago there were only 4 good restaurants in Auckland and now there are close to 8000! That says something.

Indians are resourceful and enterprising.

Kiwis marry Indians often. They see a stable Indian wife, who cares about family and children and is enterprising and resourceful.

Large numbers of Kiwis travel to India and return with rave reviews about the culture and goodness of Indians wherever they go. Bollywood dance classes have sprung up at various centers. Yoga is popular. Indian students freely mix with Kiwis in all school classifications. It seems the Indians get the best jobs first!

In all, these two cultures have found common ground to grow together.

The future looks promising for both sides.

Edit 1: I never expected this answer to generate so many readers and so many upvotes. Thanks readers. I appreciate the following. You Molas!

Issue 2: The new immigration policy has disadvantaged thousands of Indian students from studying here. Nobody's fault. Kiwis don't like devious ways to get here and it was found that many Indians used those shortcuts. This has resulted in a complete revocation of easy student visas. In the last 6 months alone, more than 15,000 visas were rejected or not extended.

Things will get better eventually for those who wish to settle here, but be warned. Finding a job, buying a house, getting into the best schools has also changed rapidly. The cost of housing is prohibitive, and finding a suitable job is even more difficult. Do your homework before landing and getting scared!

Depends on the person.

If you move from Australia, there are few immigration issues (it has to be very bad before we kick you out), and as long as you can support yourself, you can stay as long as you want.

But if you are a refugee who speaks little English from a rural area, moving to New Zealand will be very difficult. But there is also a Cambodian in my Church who came as a refugee and has done quite well.

Many foreigners have done quite well here. For example, where I work, there are many foreigners who have come here, have established a job and will be here down the long corridor. Many have gone

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Depends on the person.

If you move from Australia, there are few immigration issues (it has to be very bad before we kick you out), and as long as you can support yourself, you can stay as long as you want.

But if you are a refugee who speaks little English from a rural area, moving to New Zealand will be very difficult. But there is also a Cambodian in my Church who came as a refugee and has done quite well.

Many foreigners have done quite well here. For example, where I work, there are many foreigners who have come here, have established a job and will be here down the long corridor. Many have chosen citizenship.

But those are the success stories. Some don't end well.

Moving to New Zealand means moving to a country where the language is English. The majority race is European. The religion is Christian (often in name only) and increasingly secular. People are politically on the left (Obama is popular) and guns are controlled (sorry NRA). The national sport is rugby (not football) and we love beating Australia.

Some people will be a perfect fit, others will require a bit of effort, and some will find this very strange.

If you don't have a job or have visa problems, life can be very hard. I read of a married couple that immigration nz wants to kick their wife out for character reasons. This is because they did not disclose a deportation from Hong Kong.

A smaller population means a smaller job market. You may not be able to get the exact job you wanted. I know one of my mother's borders found out about this. And we speak English, which is not US English, which might surprise many.

We have low-level racism issues. I heard complaints about foreigners buying property in New Zealand, preventing locals from buying. I know that employers want to hire people with local experience. And where your title comes from is important. A title from Egypt or China has much less value compared to a local title or one from the English-speaking world, for example, the US or the UK. There are some well qualified taxi drivers.

We are also far from home. This makes it more difficult to go home to see family. It costs around $ 2000 round trip to get to Europe, but of course much more if you have children and other family members. Never mind the long plane rides.

So our old houses are cold and poorly insulated. Outside of cities, roads may have one lane in each direction. And very remote with limited or no cell phone reception. Public transportation may not exist in some small towns. And we only have 3 long-distance trains, and these are for tourists.

Do not move here for the money. Forget the money. We make a good living, but people here work for a living. When I'm off work, I don't want to be contacted. We have 4 level weeks every year by law, for example.

But then there are benefits.

I know of a Chinese lady who was asked by someone in China if she had to pay her fine for having a second child. He also said that he likes the fact that his children can play and grow like children.

We are far from trouble. Our great moat (the ocean) keeps these things away.

People can also escape the old social structure in their home countries and come here to develop a new life. I know that many Maori find out about this when they move to Australia.

We also have those landscapes that were used with the Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. If you grew up in a land where there were a lot of people, New Zealand's low population density is great.

conclusion

Some will love it here, some will hate it here. Some will adapt, but New Zealand is a land of benefits and not benefits.

I married a kiwi, lived the first 35 years of my life in Australia, now 12 years in Auckland, and I'd say John Franks nailed it when it came to work. If you can get a good paying job in Australia, do it in a nice place where housing is not too expensive and you live a great life. If you can get a high paying job in New Zealand do the same, however what is a high paying job in both places is different. There are more opportunities in larger Australian corporations with higher wages, and if you earn minimum wage, you are much better off in Australia. If you want to start a business, I would say t

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I married a kiwi, lived the first 35 years of my life in Australia, now 12 years in Auckland, and I'd say John Franks nailed it when it came to work. If you can get a good paying job in Australia, do it in a nice place where housing is not too expensive and you live a great life. If you can get a high paying job in New Zealand do the same, however what is a high paying job in both places is different. There are more opportunities in larger Australian corporations with higher wages, and if you earn minimum wage, you are much better off in Australia. If you want to start a business I would say it is easier in New Zealand, the people are more friendly and not as commercially aggressive. New Zealand is a small first world country, Sometimes you can go from a rich house to a poor one in a block, we have a beautiful and beautiful coastline and landscape, but you will need to take time away from your work to enjoy it. We do not have all the medical support Australia has for some diseases.

It is also much better to get your Australian citizenship if you can and then decide which country to live in.

An Australian going to New Zealand gets all benefits except unemployment on the first day. Like their children. No paperwork, just show your passport. Free school for children from both countries up to University. New Zealand recently started funding the first year of college, with the goal of getting 3 years free. NZ will also pay you an interest-free student loan of approximately $ 320 per week, if your parents are low-income or a middle-aged student, it is a welfare benefit, not a loan. Australia will expect a kiwi in Australia to pay full price for its title and may not qualify for any social benefits.

If you are a Kiwi and want to go to Australia, you are out of luck, some doctors are provided, but there are many restrictions and you are a resident with a special visa, you are not considered a citizen until you go through the same health and immigration checks and applications that any new migrant would do, which is costly. Many Kiwis who have lived in Australia have been affected by this situation, they bought a house, started a business, then a medical event happens to them or a child and they discover that they are not covered for all their costs under Medicare, their children. They are not entitled to all disability support at school or through the medical system and some workers are also denied compensation. Their medical condition will likely preclude them from applying for citizenship, so they are stuck,

To become a New Zealand citizen as an Australian, you just need to introduce yourself. Seriously, just hop on a plane, dial, resident on the arrival card, and voila. 3 minutes on the phone or at the post office they will get your tax file number, if you have a postal address you can vote and show your passport at the first medical appointment and you will get your national health ID. You can drive with your Australian license for up to 2 years and easily convert to a New Zealand one whenever you want. New Zealanders can drive in Australia in the same way.

The other big difference is that in New Zealand we do not sue for personal injury. If you have any kind of accident, from stubbing your toe to breaking your neck, the government pays for it. This means that the injury payments (if any) are quite low, you will be covered for the services. If you're looking for a great liability lawsuit payday, New Zealand is not for you. If you don't want to have to pay when kids break an arm, fall off a bike, stab each other in the eyes, hurt their back at the gym, have a car accident, break a tooth falling into the pool, etc. . are ordered.

Housing is more expensive than what you get in New Zealand on average, but as always, it depends on where you live and what you can do for a living.

New Zealand has a large population of Pacific Islanders, the largest outside of the current Pacific Islands, Australia may have more immigrants from more diverse places. New Zealand accepts only 700 refugees per year as of 2018. Australia is much more than that.

The color of the landscape in New Zealand is green, from the soft teal of the ocean to the bright green grass. Australia is much more diverse in its landscape, red desserts, olive bushes, sparkling white sand beaches, golden beaches, lush green pastures, bright blue tropical waters, dark green southern oceans.

I miss Australia, I love New Zealand.

According to me, getting public relations and a job anywhere in the country is not easy. You need to work very hard to get all of these things.

For Australia and New Zealand, both have the point-based system to select qualified immigrants for PR visa in the country. The immigration system in the two countries has also been appreciated around the world for being organized and specific.

Australia PR

The easiest way to get public relations in Australia is to apply for a skills independent subclass 189 visa. To apply for this visa, you must choose an occupation from Australia's List of Qualified Occupations (SOL) based on your skills and

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According to me, getting public relations and a job anywhere in the country is not easy. You need to work very hard to get all of these things.

For Australia and New Zealand, both have the point-based system to select qualified immigrants for PR visa in the country. The immigration system in the two countries has also been appreciated around the world for being organized and specific.

Australia PR

The easiest way to get public relations in Australia is to apply for a skills independent subclass 189 visa. To apply for this visa, you must choose an occupation from Australia's Skilled Occupations List (SOL) based on your skills and experience and submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) on Australia's SkillSelect online system.

Your profile will receive points based on age, education, work experience, language proficiency, skills, etc. (the minimum points are 60). If you are selected, you will receive an invitation to apply for a PR visa. The DIBP claims to process the subclass 189 visa within 3 months, however it all depends on how accurate your application is.

New Zealand Public Relations

Applying for a Qualified Migrant Category (SMC) visa is the easiest option to obtain a New Zealand PR visa as a skilled worker. New Zealand has a similar point-based immigration system for processing requests received for public relations. The NZ PR process in the SMC category can be divided into four steps, i.e.

Submit an expression of interest (EOI) online and earn a minimum of 100 points to be selected in the pool

Every two weeks, the best EOIs are selected from the pool of candidates. If selected, you will receive an invitation to apply for a visa.

You will have 4 months to submit the visa application

Immigration NZ will process your application and call you for an interview, etc. It is the final step, if all goes well, you will get visa approval.

Canada PR

Applying for a Canadian PR through the federal express entry system is the best way:

  • First of all, you need to collect the necessary documents to apply in the federal express entry system, i.e.
  1. Result of the IELTS test for English proficiency and
  2. Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) from WES or any other relevant assessing authority
  • Now create a profile in the federal express entry system and secure a minimum of 67 points in the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) to qualify as an applicant
  • You will be selected in the Express Entry pool of applicants and will receive a final score from CRS (Comprehensive Classification System)
  • Wait by the pool for the ITA (Invitation to Apply) for Canadian Public Relations from Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)
  • The IRCC will launch a lottery every fortnight to select applicants with the best CRS scores.
  • The CRS score requirement or qualification qualifications are announced for each giveaway and successful applicants are awarded the Canadian PR invitation.
  • Once you receive the ITA for PR Canada, you will need to submit the PR visa application form along with the documents within 90 days.
  • Attach all required documents.
  • The office will review your documents and verify your application.
  • If all goes well, you will get your PR Canada visa approved

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