How can a teenager look for a summer job?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Logan Mccarthy



How can a teenager look for a summer job?

First, find out who hires in your area, don't be picky.

Make a list of prospects, use the internet, but don't rely entirely on it.

Make a resume, you don't have much (or no) experience, but list significant accomplishments (class president, captain of a club or team, eagle scout, etc.)

Ask your parents and your friends if they know of someone hiring, the networks work

When filling out an application, either in person or online, make sure it is complete, accurate, well written, and handwritten in clean ink.

When called for an interview, clean up, put on a suit, arrive early, be courteous to everyone, bring at least two black pens, have the names, addresses, phone numbers and jobs of at least three references, your references should be any previous employer, if you've never had a job, then teachers, coaches, scout leaders, etc. (be sure to talk to each person you want to use as a reference in advance) when the interview is called, come in and shake the interviewer's hand and thank them for taking the time to see you, sit up straight, speak clearly, look at the person who is speaking, DO NOT INTERRUPT !!! Answer fully, but don't ramble, say sir or ma'am, let the interviewer know you want this job, not so much by saying but by the way you act,

When hired, arrive early, stay late, work hard, listen, ask if you don't know or understand something, keep busy, if you're not doing anything, grab a broom, under no circumstances look at your phone, in fact, if you have a locker, leave your phone there.

Open a bank account and save as much of each paycheck as possible, but not less than 20%, trust me, this habit will pay off over time.

At the end of the summer, let your employer know at least two weeks in advance, thank both your immediate supervisor and the person who hired you for providing the opportunity, thank your co-workers, and give special notice to those most They helped him.

About a week after you return to school, write a letter to your former employer thanking them again for the opportunity.

"In the past," I literally trudged a 2-mile strip of business and filled out applications until I got an offer. It took two days. Things have changed significantly in the sense that most companies are now forcing you to apply online, making you a faceless applicant being graded by a computer. The manager may not even have a chance to see your application. But here are some things that can help:

  1. Take a day to see who is hiring near you. Many places still put up posters. Then go home and apply. (see # 7) If a location interests you but doesn't have a sign, check their website for open positions
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"In the past," I literally trudged a 2-mile strip of business and filled out applications until I got an offer. It took two days. Things have changed significantly in the sense that most companies are now forcing you to apply online, making you a faceless applicant being graded by a computer. The manager may not even have a chance to see your application. But here are some things that can help:

  1. Take a day to see who is hiring near you. Many places still put up posters. Then go home and apply. (See # 7) If a location interests you but doesn't have a sign, check their website for openings.
  2. Network. Tell people you are looking for work and what jobs you are willing to do, and ask them to consider it if they see a hiring somewhere. Parents, friends, older relatives, the parents of your friends, etc., work or go places that you may never have considered. (Garden centers, swim schools, nursing homes, fabric / craft stores, hardware stores, tourist / entertainment venues, etc.)
  3. If you must search for jobs online, use aggregate sites (Indeed, SnagAJob, etc.) to find jobs that are hiring. Then apply directly on the company site if possible. There are some exceptions to this, such as the "one-click" application, but company sites can be more specific about the positions that are available, the locations they are actually hiring, and the requirements. (Cooks may need to be 18 years old, but dishwashers and hosts only need to be 16 years old.)
  4. Limit your search to recent posts. (1 to 7 days)
  5. Read the posts to see if you are excluded by age or for some other reason. So you don't waste time applying for jobs you won't get.
  6. Get an idea of ​​when to apply for a seasonal job. (Christmas retail jobs fill September through October. Many summer jobs interview between February and March.) Other seasonal jobs may depend on where you are and what the job is (skiing, amusement parks, zoos ...). It gives you time to complete trainings and certifications (first aid, salvage, sanitation) before you begin.
  7. As often as possible, read the entire post and see if they allow you to apply in person. If so, apply in person. Just make sure you make a good first impression (dress a little better than you think you need, write down your references and anything else you don't know by heart, check your spelling). Prepare for the interview on the spot. These are usually smaller franchises or employers.
  8. Keep looking until you have an offer. Too many times teens take "We'll get back to you in 2-3 weeks." as a sign that they will be hired and will stop applying elsewhere.
  9. Find out what it has to offer that can set you apart from other applicants: no kids, not in school during the summer, willing to work early / late / weekends, live 5 blocks away, experience with kids, bilingual, just enough Strong to do manual labor and not going to college in the fall are examples of things that can make you more attractive to an employer.

Finding work is difficult for anyone. As a teenager, you may be struggling because you are inexperienced and are applying for jobs for which more experienced candidates have also applied.

A couple of mistakes young people often make when applying for a job:

1. Apply at the wrong time. Retail jobs, often applied for by teens, typically begin hiring for the holiday season in late September-October. In January, they begin to cut the hours of regular employees and get rid of seasonal employees. They will keep some of the best seasonal employees as part-time workers, but they won't get as many hours as they did. Whi

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Finding work is difficult for anyone. As a teenager, you may be struggling because you are inexperienced and are applying for jobs for which more experienced candidates have also applied.

A couple of mistakes young people often make when applying for a job:

1. Apply at the wrong time. Retail jobs, often applied for by teens, typically begin hiring for the holiday season in late September-October. In January, they begin to cut the hours of regular employees and get rid of seasonal employees. They will keep some of the best seasonal employees as part-time workers, but they won't get as many hours as they did. While they will hire sporadically throughout the year as they lose employees, there will be far fewer positions available and their chances of being hired with no experience are significantly reduced. So if you want a job in retail, apply in September for the best chance.

2. Not wanting the most boring jobs. If you are a teenager who wants to work, you must assume that no job is below you. It's very difficult to get a job without work experience, so you can't afford to be picky. Take what you can, show up on time, do what they ask of you, and after six months, you'll have a much better chance of landing a job you like. Remember that you are competing for jobs against people who have college degrees, people who have decades of experience, people who will work harder and longer hours because they have children to feed. Don't be arrogant. Take everything you can carry.

Well it depends a lot on what you are looking for, any job that is within your area of ​​interest or that brings you some personal benefit is not a particularly bad job, but I don't think there is any (minimum legal) job that is intrinsically " bad":

Sure some would say that working at McDonalds would be a bad idea, but if you want to get better at dealing with people, why not? If you need work experience, there is nothing wrong with working at any job.

Now for jobs that are worse during the summer:

  1. Lifeguard at an open beach or pool. Your skin will beg for mercy and I will not break you
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Well it depends a lot on what you are looking for, any job that is within your area of ​​interest or that brings you some personal benefit is not a particularly bad job, but I don't think there is any (minimum legal) job that is intrinsically " bad":

Sure some would say that working at McDonalds would be a bad idea, but if you want to get better at dealing with people, why not? If you need work experience, there is nothing wrong with working at any job.

Now for jobs that are worse during the summer:

  1. Lifeguard at an open beach or pool. Your skin will beg for mercy and you won't particularly like your tan. Also, there are too many kids and children (troublemakers, who can't stop running) during the summer.
  2. Working, say, in a zoo or any other place that requires being outdoors for long periods of time.
  3. Work in a gift shop or some similar place in a city that attracts tourists. Most of the people who travel abroad choose to do it during the summer, and the language barrier (due to different accents or not knowing the language) could cause a lot of discomfort.
  4. Or work anywhere else that might get too crowded during the summer, making your work hours a bit more stressful. Work in airports, carnivals, amusement parks, ice cream parlors or beaches.

However, in the end I will remind you that the worst job (legal, again) would probably be not having a job.

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours is not exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and dealing with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an idea of ​​a boring job and therefore you will motivate just as it had motivated me not to stop doing something like

Keep reading

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours isn't exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and how to deal with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an insight into a boring job and therefore , it will motivate you just as it had motivated me not to end up doing something like that in the future, after that job, I would always tell myself that if I don't keep improving, that's what would get me and that scared the shit out of me and pushed me to go do more work.

2 waiters and banquets

This is fun. You get to meet a lot of new people that you wouldn't have met otherwise, in fact I met some people that I went back to work with later. Also, the waiter taught me a lot about how to deal with customers, especially angry or even abusive ones, in terms of how to talk to them, how to serve them, and also how to handle criticism and comments appropriately. I see this as an invaluable lesson, as in the future if you don't know how to treat your customers or handle and then respond to feedback, you are in real trouble. Also on the fun side of things, I was able to explore the hotel in its entirety, seeing places that I would not have seen and also meeting clients that I would not have met otherwise, that would be very useful contacts in the future. This one also taught me a bit about F&B. How to organize people, how to motivate them, how to make sure work is done always and to a good standard. It also gave me an idea of ​​the management structure of these types of companies, who responds to whom, etc. and it also allowed me to see what each person's work involved and how they would do it. A very good insight into the food and beverage industry.

3. Marketing executive

This is one of my favorites. You may think that this may be unattainable due to lack of workplace experience etc, but it is not. Target some really small or new businesses that really need people or others that don't have a full department, like in this case, marketing. And just for the record, before I got this job, all I had was my IGCSE exam report card, nothing more, in fact, the guy didn't even ask me for any credentials. So take the lesson, which you'll never know until you try, just go out there, bite your lip, and get the job.

It was a great job with incredible knowledge and experience. During this (ongoing) time, I was basically working for an interior design and renovation company that had essentially no digitization or online presence of any kind. My job started simply as advertising and looking for new clients who wanted home improvements. I would post ads on different sites, suggest things through word of mouth, and also make some cold calls to gather new clients who would like to rebuild their houses in exchange for a% commission. Later, along with one of my best friends, they asked me to start bringing online presence (we were the only two types of marketers in the company), as you can see now, we started juggling two jobs, both marketing and prospecting for new customers. I continued to run ads and get a couple of inquiries and closing deals from time to time, ad serving and customer prospecting taught me things like writing your ads in an attractive way and also serving substantial content in your ads to build trust among customers. potentials. Useful stuff but not adequate experience as a whole

However, the real learning came from the online marketing experience. I learned so many things that maybe I only learned in 5 years when I took my finger out of my butt, however this opportunity taught me things early on that I think would be invaluable later on in my ambitions of going into business / entrepreneurship, especially this one. digital age. The experience taught me about content marketing, how to eliminate clutter and keep putting better and better content. I started writing articles for the company that would be useful to consumers and hopefully translate into sales. I learned about SEO (how to make my website have better search rankings in Google) so that more people can locate the website and also drive traffic to it effectively. I learned how to use analytics to track progress and constantly improve my campaign. I learned how to use CMS to create attractive websites also without coding (Website Development). This also gave me the opportunity to run a social media marketing campaign, giving me insight into what worked and what didn't, and what consumers would respond to and what they didn't like. This opportunity also allowed me to see the market prices for home improvement in the country, which led me to save my family a lot of money when a contractor came up and tried to scam my family. Overall, this experience gave me an opportunity to learn more about the internet and what happens online, and it also taught me a bit about how online marketing works and how it could improve. Without this job I would never have opened my eyes to this online marketing and would probably only learn these things in a few years (when it really mattered), while others my age were already geniuses at it. .

4. Sales executive

Another one of my favorites. This job taught me a lot in my ambition to be a great salesperson. I also had the opportunity to meet other people I would never have met otherwise, such as full-time programmers, designers, and other salespeople, and it also gave me my first experience of true corporate life. If you are outgoing and enjoy persuading and talking to people, this type of work will be great for you.

My job here was to sell B2B to F&B establishments a custom restaurant mobile app that was created by a group of Indian programmers who were also part of the company. He needed to cold call and email potential restaurants that might have been interested in him. Later he would have to arrange a meeting with the manager of the establishment and try to sell the application to his company. This was an extremely fun job, especially the meeting with the heads of the restaurant and all the sales part that is exciting, especially when a deal is closed. As for the telemarketing part of the job, it taught me a lot about how to handle severe rejection, especially when telemarketing you're hung up 90% of the time.

This was also a job that I had been dying for because I knew I would be successful later on, especially in my business ambitions, I would have to know how to sell things, otherwise I would die a slow and painful death.

First of all, this work squashed my earlier take on salespeople as charismatic people who just mix, have a killer speech, make the guy drool, and then sell you the product and show off on commission in 30 seconds.

I also had the opportunity to attend company funded seminars / talks on how to be a better seller and what not, and also to deepen my understanding of the product and the areas to cover or target when trying to sell the product to a specific group of customers. , etc. ... I learned a lot about patience, especially in difficult situations (I am impatient by nature), dealing with difficult questions or even criticism from customers, and how to respond appropriately and quickly without sounding like an idiot. And also how to behave and improve my speaking skills in general.

And again, not to mention the contacts I made while working there, from managers, designers, programmers, or just desk workers who could share with me what their experiences are like.

If I hadn't gotten this job, I would never have learned the vast things that I had the opportunity to learn in terms of sales techniques, and also just building networks with both my clients and my coworkers.

5. Retail assistant:

My job at the chocolate retail store was to help customers with their purchases and make sure the shelves were neat and clean and that we had enough inventory. Although I learned a lot of valuable lessons and got some great ideas, the foundational work itself wasn't particularly fun or challenging, especially during periods when there are no customers or they don't need help and you end up just walking around the store in limbo.


INDEPENDENT WORKS:

- WEB DEVELOPMENT

This is a great skill to have in life and it can also be very financially rewarding. There is an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, who need help building a website or who need some work related to web development so that you always have the opportunity to get jobs in freelance communities that pay quite well in addition to that. .

Even outside of the autonomous communities, there are tons of small micro or small businesses in your neighborhood or area or whatever that also need help getting a company website or having some kind of website for clients. On the other hand, you can connect with these people. They didn't care about your age as long as you do the work, plus you don't technically work for them, you just made an informal arrangement. Yes, you have some learning that you must learn to catch up, but it will be worth it and reap its rewards. Trust me.

- SEO & DIGITAL MARKETING.

Another fantastic skill especially in a world dominated by the internet. Like web development, this is another skill that seems to have an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, demanding both in autonomous communities and among small businesses. All entrepreneurs want to be on the first page of Google, they want a good reach on social media, they want to interact with their audience, they want to build their brand online, implement content marketing, etc. Often they don't have the time or don't know how to do it at all. This is where you can come in and offer your services. Note that these also pay quite well.

However, again, you will have to learn and acquire these skills to a business standard in order to monetize effectively. Will it take time and hard work to learn? Hell yeah! Will it be worth the time invested? Hell yeah! If you have pure ambition, nothing can stop you from going from point A to B. If you want to earn money and have a job like no other 14-year-old, behave and learn like no other 14-year-old.

- DESIGN.

Yet another fantastic skill to have, not to mention profitable. Having the skills of a web developer, digital marketer, and designer together makes for an amazing combination. You will literally be a wrecking ball. If you can do all three right, people will fight for you to be the guy who works on their projects. From first needing to hire 3 people to cover these aspects, now they have a 14 year old 3 in 1 beast they can trust. I'm still trying to think of a better freelancer that I can hire.

Again, there are tons of people who don't know how to use design software (Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch, Final Cut, Premiere, etc.) or may not have the time to do so. Masses and masses of people both online and offline. Like the previous two skills, there seems to be an endless supply of people for the foreseeable future who need help designing things, which is again where you can step in and continually fill that void. Obviously, this will require some substantial learning as well, but again, it will pay off in the long run both for doing work for others and for your own endeavors. Remember, you have time. Also, how much easier would it be to attract clients if they want design services, but can you also add some web development or SEO? You immediately become a more attractive person to work with.

- COPYWRITING.

Learn some copywriting. It's another brilliant and in-demand skill, especially at a young age when you have plenty of time to practice. A lot of people can't write a copy for shit and they will reach out and be willing to make a lot of money (I've heard of people who can charge $ 80-100 + for 500 words) to get a good copy of their products and what not.

If you don't know what it is, copywriting is basically writing something like a 'sales pitch' on ads, websites (online), etc. that gets potential customers and customers to take action, whether it's to buy something. or subscribe, depending on the seller. It goes without saying that writing good copy is a skill that needs to be practiced, analyzed and learned, so once again you will have to invest time and hard work to master this; However, it goes without saying once again, it is a skill that is absolutely worth having. A great skill for you, but also one that is demanded and can be easily monetized both with independent online search engines and with small businesses and startups that need to push their product.

If you're not sure how to get clients, here are some things you can try:

- Offer to speak on the phone or Skype with them to discuss exactly what you will do for them and give them a breakdown of the costs you will charge them. This helps the potential client feel more comfortable and happy working with you because you have really made the effort to make contact with them and are keeping them informed. I would definitely feel a little awkward if I was paying a guy that I can't even see on the other end and who I have no idea why they are charging me what they charge. Don't let your clients feel that. Leave those thoughts at rest. Establish trust the first time you make contact and build on it. I prefer to work with someone with less experience but who I can trust rather than someone who could be better but who I cannot trust at all. Consumer confidence online is fragile, especially when it comes to money. Put those fears to rest.

- Offer some small services for free to establish a relationship that you are not there to rip them off. Offer to submit work samples or drafts of what you are going to do before you start on the really paid stuff. This helps build confidence that you are genuine and legitimate and that you want to help them. Doing a few things for free also helps build a portfolio, which is crucial. You may think that doing things for free the first few times defeats the purpose of making money. You don't though, think long-term instead of short-term, make small short-term sacrifices, and in the long run, you will reap the benefits and your returns will be better rather than if you try to start annoying people with the starting price. If you sow generosity, you will reap generosity.

- Talk to your customers not as objects or business partners with whom you earn money, but as human beings and friends whom you are trying to help solve a problem. Again, it helps the trust aspect of the deal and also allows your client to sleep soundly knowing that their money has gone to someone with whom they have little more than a business relationship.

- Offer your customers discounts if they return or discounts for their friends. It gives them a sense of exclusivity that everyone loves.

- Just do your job well and to the best of your ability. Nothing is a better motivator for customers to come to you than a job well done. Everyone has to start somewhere. What matters is what you do once you start. Also keep in mind that people are willing to pay for quality. Maybe you can say that your programming skills are not great or that you do not know digital marketing. That's fine. Start learning them and improving your application to the point of commercial use. Dont be lazy. Nothing worthwhile is easy, definitely not money. Work hard now to learn it, and in the long run, you will appreciate it. Remember, you are 14 years old, you have time!

Hope this helped!

A2A ... now let's see what comes to my fervent mind, or if that feverish mind comes to mind ...

A basketball player from the NCAA to the NBA could be 19 years old when he starts.

Child actor or pop singer ... but who wants to be Ariana Grande / Justin Bieber?

Do you have skills? Can you create the next super app that no one else thought of and take over the market while protecting your intellectual property rights?

Do you have a family with a business? I know someone who hired their children, but most of the money went to a tax-deferred college fund.

Assuming you are a law abiding high school student, I think that leaves you mostly with minimal part time

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A2A ... now let's see what comes to my fervent mind, or if that feverish mind comes to mind ...

A basketball player from the NCAA to the NBA could be 19 years old when he starts.

Child actor or pop singer ... but who wants to be Ariana Grande / Justin Bieber?

Do you have skills? Can you create the next super app that no one else thought of and take over the market while protecting your intellectual property rights?

Do you have a family with a business? I know someone who hired their children, but most of the money went to a tax-deferred college fund.

Assuming you're a law-abiding high school student, I think that leaves you mostly with part-time minimum wage jobs. Then there are the short-term sid-gig types of things: babysitting, odd jobs for the neighbors, etc.

An alternative to minimum wage would be to wait or help at the tables. Paychecks are less than minimum wage, but tips more than make up for it. If you're out of high school or don't have college plans, this can set you up for longer-term gains.

If you are outside of HS, check with some of the larger HVAC companies in your area. Many of them have training programs. SUI as well.

Sorry ... no gold mines, but good luck.

That's what I did, I just walked through an industrial park, went through the search ads, and filled out all the applications. In other years, he called friends and family. He drove and looked for signs of help.

I ended up with three fence construction companies, a landscaper, some painting work, a car wash, a little plumbing apprentice, pharmacy delivery, asphalt laying job, during my time in college.

You should search online for companies in your area in the market where you want to work. Either that or go to the nearest McDonalds or Tim Hortons.

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