How can a software developer find a good recruiter?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jamal Vinson



How can a software developer find a good recruiter?

This is a great question that not enough engineers ask when they are looking for work. It is not enough to simply find a recruiter who says they can find you a job, but it is more important to find someone who can actually represent YOU as an agent. Like anything else in life, there are good and bad recruiters (probably more bad than good, unfortunately), but here are five simple questions you can use to help your search and evaluations to find the ones you should be working with compared to. with the ones that are not worth it.

  1. Do they respond? - This seems a bit
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This is a great question that not enough engineers ask when they are looking for work. It is not enough to simply find a recruiter who says they can find you a job, but it is more important to find someone who can actually represent YOU as an agent. Like anything else in life, there are good and bad recruiters (probably more bad than good, unfortunately), but here are five simple questions you can use to help your search and evaluations to find the ones you should be working with compared to. with the ones that are not worth it.

  1. Do they respond? - This seems like a small thing, but it's actually HUGE. Are they the type of recruiter who is willing to respond to let you know that they have NO updates, just so you know they received your email and are working on your behalf? Or are you the type who never listens to anything until he needs something from you, i.e. scheduling you for an interview, getting an up-to-date resume or client information, etc.? Being out of work can be stressful and super emotional, and the recruiter who doesn't take the time to return a phone call or email to make sure you know you haven't forgotten to alleviate some of this emotional distress isn't. It is probably someone who will genuinely care about your best interests.
  2. Are they specialized? - This is obvious. A specialized recruiter who focuses on a technology that relates exclusively to you will be more connected to the people in your field, as well as having a better ability to understand what you do and how best to market it. If this person recruits all the skills under the sun, the chance that they are a mile wide and an inch deep won't help their chances of getting in front of that elusive customer who has millions of these "generics." recruiters banging on your door every day.
  3. Are they focused only on the job they are trying to fill? - You can tell this by how quickly they end the phone with you when they realize that you are not a good fit for the job they are working on. Do they end the call abruptly and appreciate your time, or do they continue to learn more about you to see if they can help you find something in the future?
  4. Do you offer any career / resume advice? - Are they giving you any suggestions on what to do to improve your resume, interview techniques, or overall job search strategy? The best recruiters are consultants too and if your recruiter isn't giving you ANY professional advice then you need to find one who can.
  5. Are they telling you to work ONLY with them? - This is a big one. If a recruiter tells you that you shouldn't work with any other staffing agencies, then you should STOP working with them IMMEDIATELY. The reality of the market is that some companies will only work with certain recruiters for whatever and no one recruiter can have every job available. So you need to have multiple connections to increase your chances of getting something, and if a recruiter tells you to put all your faith in them, BE CAREFUL. They don't really care that you get a job; they just want to make sure they place you for a fee.

That is all. Five simple questions that should help you sort the wheat from the chaff when it comes to finding the best recruiters. PLEASE NOTE: This process is not something that can happen overnight, as you usually need to see how a recruiter behaves in advance to know if they are someone to work with. However, when you spot negative behaviors in a recruiter, take note of them and decrease your interaction with them, while increasing your relationship with a recruiter who exhibits the correct ones. Over time, you should be able to narrow down your recruiting team to a group of 3 to 5 trusted recruiters that you can trust to help you when needed, and if you're really lucky, maybe even make a friend or two on the job. process.

More about Ken M. Middleton

I'm a dedicated DevOps recruiter who specializes in connecting the best DevOps talent with the best DevOps opportunity. If you are interested in scheduling a session for professional DevOps advice or to discuss any future DevOps needs, feel free to schedule some time on my website.

You can also check out my YouTube channel, The Dhub Repository for DevOps, or just general professional advice. I'm always looking for new topics and comments, so feel free to subscribe and share your thoughts and comments.

Happy continuous improvement ...

#devops #devopscareeradvice #careeradvice #IT #jobsearch #salary #money

A bit of history: I've been experimenting with software consulting with the Fortune 500 for a while, I was one of the big cheeses of a now-old software recruiting company called Ram Millenium Tech, dealing with hundreds of recruiters.

This is not a good question, a good recruiter is too lazy.

You should ask this: How can I find a recruiter who is wired like God so that he can get me in front of the hiring managers of major companies and at the same time care about me as a long-term investment in order to have a long term? term business relationship with.

I left the recruiting world after our st.

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A bit of history: I've been experimenting with software consulting with the Fortune 500 for a while, I was one of the big cheeses of a now-old software recruiting company called Ram Millenium Tech, dealing with hundreds of recruiters.

This is not a good question, a good recruiter is too lazy.

You should ask this: How can I find a recruiter who is wired like God so that he can get me in front of the hiring managers of major companies and at the same time care about me as a long-term investment in order to have a long term? term business relationship with.

I left the recruiting world after our initial experience, as recruiting quickly became a basic numbers game ... most recruiters are unfamiliar with their clients, the industry, and the field of software development. They send hundreds of emails a day through young colleagues to the "talent pool" and keep looking for new clients. They offer the exact same service as any other recruiter ... distinguishing factor ... haircut?

It's almost like the joke ... if you know how to code, you do it ... if you don't know, you teach ... if you can't teach, you will recruit.

Finding a recruiter you would like to associate with on long-term business terms is an investment, so start by asking the right questions: how good are they, when things go wrong, what do they do, after recruiting, what are they good for? and what other consultants say about them.

It would start with getting references on the recruiters themselves ... doing a reference check on them, interviewing them about their "technical" knowledge, and then starting with a short-term trial contract.

Most will leave ... leave them.

Rare and almost impossible. I have worked in software engineering for over 10 years. Most have no idea of ​​anything other than detecting keywords. A recruiter once told me "Oh, you work with AWS but not with the cloud." Later I found out that they work as a personal trainer. Some are just plain rude and will sell it if they feel like you can get a commission. Recently one bothered me nonstop for turning down interviews after getting through the initial rounds (I found out the company was crap after speaking directly to their employees), I had to turn off my phone and block their email. I have or

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Rare and almost impossible. I have worked in software engineering for over 10 years. Most have no idea of ​​anything other than detecting keywords. A recruiter once told me "Oh, you work with AWS but not with the cloud." Later I found out that they work as a personal trainer. Some are just plain rude and will sell it if they feel like you can get a commission. Recently one bothered me nonstop for turning down interviews after getting through the initial rounds (I found out the company was crap after speaking directly to their employees), I had to turn off my phone and block their email. I have only met one decent recruiter out of the hundreds who have contacted me and I know him personally. Honestly,

I'm not mean, but I'm definitely all business with them and occasionally abrupt. This is why:

  1. There are many more positions than qualified people. Businesses are always looking for a savior to get out of trouble. Usually the best candidates are already employed. Recruiters are constantly trying to find these people. Given the scenery and the competition, they get aggressive.
  2. Recruiting, like all sales jobs, is a numbers game, and many tech professionals innately realize this and don't like being treated like a commodity. Basically, you are dealing with a glorified car salesman, except you are the car here and you hire.
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I'm not mean, but I'm definitely all business with them and occasionally abrupt. This is why:

  1. There are many more positions than qualified people. Businesses are always looking for a savior to get out of trouble. Usually the best candidates are already employed. Recruiters are constantly trying to find these people. Given the scenery and the competition, they get aggressive.
  2. Recruiting, like all sales jobs, is a numbers game, and many tech professionals innately realize this and don't like being treated like a commodity. You are basically dealing with a glorified car salesman, except that you are the car here and the hiring companies are the people who navigate. In short, they don't work for you and they don't care about your best interests.
  3. To that end, they use Booleans and other related search engines to view resumes. They don't have time physically to go over each resume in detail, so they often apply the buckshot approach of scattering everywhere in hopes of making contact. Hence, bulk email, cold calling at all hours, etc. Both factors lead to ...
  4. They throw everything at you. I mean EVERYTHING. Example: I managed a SAP / Salesforce integration once for several months, so I included it in the experience section of my resume and I still receive emails from SAP developers with 5 to 7 years of experience. I'm not that guy, but if you spend even 15 seconds with my resume, I'd know. Leading to ...
  5. They often hang sub-grade jobs. Another example, I did tech support a long time ago, and I worked really hard to get into management, so why would I choose to go back a decade and accept a crushing pay cut? One more proof that you didn't take a look at my resume.
  6. The volume, good pain. Today alone I have received 12 different emails from recruiters. I work long hours, I don't have the time or desire to interact with all of them. It's like being called by car salesmen and vacuum cleaners all day, even if you need it, there is a certain tiredness.
  7. They offer rates that are below what you currently need or order. If you point this out, they will point to an often weak justification to try to convince you that it is worth less than the asking price.
  8. They ask you to move in in the blink of an eye. Such relocation can come with little or no adjustment to increase the cost of living. So you want me to relocate my family to New York or the Bay Area and in return I will earn 10K on my current salary, which equates to a pay cut? Craziness.
  9. This is all pretty bad and would leave a bad taste in anyone's mouth, but wait, it gets worse ...
  10. They mostly offer contract or contract to hire, which is an uncomfortable feeling for many, especially if you are currently in a permanent position.
  11. If you have a contract, there are a number of stipulations that they don't volunteer over that you may not have much control over, even if you can get the information (which is a big yes). For example, what is the load (which translates to the amount billed per hour minus your salary)? Some companies are corporate and reputable here, others are not and will try to maximize your profits (read: lowest rate for you, the clean hiring company with a very high profit). What is the termination clause if the client wants to have you permanent? Some companies have a reasonable fee that covers a bit of loss, others demand a substantial portion of your annual expenses (so if you are paid 100k and the company bills 150k, it could be 75% or 112,500). Not surprisingly, many customers see this and think, "It's good and valuable, but we can replace it with a less expensive resource without this release clause." I came across this after spending two years leading a great team at a finance company, where I built an app for a show they still advertise nationally. They loved me, but I didn't get a chance to become permanent thanks to a policy that I wasn't aware of when I signed. They do this because ... but I did not have the opportunity to become permanent thanks to a policy that I was not aware of when I signed. They do this because ... but I did not have the opportunity to become permanent thanks to a policy that I was not aware of when I signed. They do this because ...
  12. Recruitment companies see it as a commodity that makes them cash. With the wrong one, you will get stuck working with them for a long time. Spent a year in one place, finally got comfortable with the equipment and technology, and made some friends? Now they need you at bank X or insurance company Y, or you can find a new job on your own.
  13. Some less reputable recruiters and companies will try to get your resume and buy it or display your resume in their talent database without your consent. They hang vague positions or the promise of a future that does not materialize. And I do not want to be bought indiscriminately, it can damage my reputation in several ways.
  14. Lastly, it is difficult to know what type of company you are dealing with. Some have burned bridges to clients and have no idea, so you have no chance to cross them. Others will try to send it to a company that it has already been shipped to, and if a hiring manager sees two copies of your resume from different sources, they often decide they don't want to find out which company gets the shipment and just kick you out.

So if we're being rude or mean, it's probably not like that. We just don't want to be taken advantage of in the way that we or a colleague were in the past. Job hunting is tough enough, but recruiters can make it worse.

To be fair, I know a few recruiters that I really like, and I even have a couple that I consider friends. But too many are desperate for commission, and they see me as the tool to get it, and nothing more. Learn to spot the good recruiters, not to converse with the bad guys, and to cultivate those relationships for when you may need them in the future.

It all makes for an awkward dance, and I've also used the analogy previously employed by another response from the attractive single woman at the bar: some may be genuinely interested, but others are just trying to satisfy selfish desires, not caring about you. .

Update: Thanks for all the votes in favor. I wanted to attach this good article from Dice that addresses much of what I wrote here: What Recruiters Don't Want You To Know - Dice Insights

Thanks for the A2A. The question is too generic for my liking. But some things are fundamental. And true for any profession.

Start with compensation. It is neither "good" nor "competitive". The market rate. If you want Google caliber engineers, pay like Google. Not necessarily in money. You can use equity. The latter will only work if you have a legitimate niche. You can try to mislead MBA investors. Not engineers. They will see through. So if you don't have a solid idea, intellectual property, or business niche, that would make someone a millionaire, it's just salary. At the end of the day, this is the first question any profession asks.

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Thanks for the A2A. The question is too generic for my liking. But some things are fundamental. And true for any profession.

Start with compensation. It is neither "good" nor "competitive". The market rate. If you want Google caliber engineers, pay like Google. Not necessarily in money. You can use equity. The latter will only work if you have a legitimate niche. You can try to mislead MBA investors. Not engineers. They will see through. So if you don't have a solid idea, intellectual property, or business niche, that would make someone a millionaire, it's just salary. At the end of the day, this is the first question any professional asks: what do I get? The first base to cover.

We do it to live. A "good" developer is a mature one. It doesn't matter if someone is 18 or 50 years old. Part of maturity is knowing how much my services are worth. No diamonds in the rough, undiscovered geniuses and other nonsense. Great software developers aren't just good at writing code. They also have skills with people. They know how to sell themselves. Don't try to find a weakness to exploit. Don't expect someone to agree to work for less for some irrational personal reason. Being rational (to solve your problems) is what we do for a living.

Software development is art. There are no low-level "encoders", as you are probably discovering. They create more problems when trying to solve one. I understand your frustration, because the commodification of software engineering through "outsourcing" "offshore" flooded the recruitment channels with useless "coders". Businesses understand it now. The damage is irreversible. The canals will remain flooded. You won't find anybody good, if your resume is in the middle of the row of 1000 seemingly qualified candidates that recruiters randomly threw at you. If you are a recruiter, why did you suddenly start to worry? Play that clueless third world roulette and tell your customers that "there are no good people in the market."

What should you look for? Achievements. Not the ones listed on a useless piece of paper called a “resume”. Real published apps / sites and other "portfolios".

Yes, there are helpful recruiters, but they may not be specifically for you. This is why.

If you are a recent graduate (graduated in 2012 or later) and have your sights set on a large company (ie> 100 people), I recommend that you apply directly rather than through an agency. What I'm going to say is kind of bullshit and probably a bit controversial, but I'm passing on what I've learned from direct experience.

Large companies have full internal recruiting departments, and within those departments, there is a sub-department specifically dedicated to college recruiting. Every year

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Yes, there are helpful recruiters, but they may not be specifically for you. This is why.

If you are a recent graduate (graduated in 2012 or later) and have your sights set on a large company (ie> 100 people), I recommend that you apply directly rather than through an agency. What I'm going to say is kind of bullshit and probably a bit controversial, but I'm passing on what I've learned from direct experience.

Large companies have full internal recruiting departments, and within those departments, there is a sub-department specifically dedicated to college recruiting. Each year, this sub-department spends tens of thousands of dollars and hundreds of man-hours taking people to career fairs, giving technology talks, advertising on campus, handing out articles, and doing whatever it takes to keep its new portfolio full. of graduates. . Because new graduates require more mentoring and support than seasoned engineers, there are a limited number of new graduates a company can hire at one time. With enough effort and a strong brand, these companies can complete their new flow of graduates to their capacity through their own efforts, and they are not. '

So let's say you go through an agency to try to get your information to one of these companies. Most likely, the agency will be faced with an internal recruiter who will tell them that they are not looking for new graduates from the agency. So the recruiter has a choice. They can contact you and tell you that the company was not interested OR they can tell the company that this type of approach is unfair to the new graduate in question (because then, effectively, said recent graduate is punished for going through an agency) and leave that the company takes the candidate for free. The first approach certainly involves less overhead and contractual quirks, which is why most people tend to go with that.

So if you are a recent graduate, apply directly. If you don't look stellar on paper, you may not get an answer because applying to a big company online is the moral equivalent of screaming into a black hole, but at least this way you are judged on how you present yourself. rather than being at a disadvantage due to the channel through which it entered. And there are definitely things you can do to become a more attractive candidate. See Jesse Farmer's answer to If programmers are in such high demand, why don't companies hire people with skills who lack "on the job" experience? for some really helpful suggestions.

Note that this advice only applies to companies with in-house college recruiting operations. Smaller startups are generally more receptive to new graduates arriving through agencies, in my experience. In that scenario, a recruiter can definitely be helpful in giving you insight into which companies are hiring (i.e. companies you may not have heard of before), what projects are coming up on the roadmap, what the job is like. engineering culture, what kind of compensation you can expect for specific roles, how much traction does the company in question have, etc.

Absolutely not! If you don't adjust your resume keywords to match the online job posting, your resume may be thrown into the black hole and never seen by a recruiter or HR. It really sucks that we're in this situation where we have to work so hard on a document that helps us get our foot in the door, but it is what it is and we have to adjust. Here's an answer I gave to a similar question that highlights some text comparison tools that anyone can use to compare skill or achievement keywords side by side from their resume to job posting. Mill Montejo's answer to What are some goo

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Absolutely not! If you don't adjust your resume keywords to match the online job posting, your resume may be thrown into the black hole and never seen by a recruiter or HR. It really sucks that we're in this situation where we have to work so hard on a document that helps us get our foot in the door, but it is what it is and we have to adjust. Here's an answer I gave to a similar question that highlights some text comparison tools that anyone can use to compare skill or achievement keywords side by side from their resume to job posting. Mill Montejo's answer to What are some good online tools for evaluating resumes?

Here are my recommendations from my knowledge of the systems (ATS) used by medium and large companies to scan the resume you send.

Application via companies' corporate website (Taleo, other software)
Upload a text version or ASCII file of your resume or a Word 2003 .doc file. These are the file types most liked by tracking systems of candidates, who analyze better and read better. Please do not upload a PDF version of your resume as the ATS does not read them well. Why risk that your company is not using a newer version of software that reads PDF well? You can load the latest version of Word with the .docx file extension, but if you have a .doc I'd stick with that one.

You have an email from a hiring manager or HR contact
When you send your resume to a contact whose email you have obtained, you can attach any type of resume you want, infographic, PDF, .docx, etc. You can bring an infographic resume as an added visual impact bonus to set yourself apart from the rest.

You have a contact or name of hiring managers.
Try mailing your resume. With the advent of email, no one sends hard copies anymore. If you have the names of the hiring managers, mail them to the USPO for their attention. You can also fax it to the Human Resources fax number or main fax if you can get it. Always make a quick follow-up call to make sure it was received and forwarded to the appropriate party.

Good luck in your job searches.

Software development and recruiting are totally different fields in IT, they may have some commonalities, but that's negligible.

Software development work is creative and more technical in nature. Development, support, improvement, and monitoring are important tasks for all software developers. The SE universities curriculum is more aligned with software or product development work and this education does not include anything about recruitment cycles or relevant soft skills. So when the software engineer leaves engineering college, he is naturally built to be a developer, not a recruiter.

For

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Software development and recruiting are totally different fields in IT, they may have some commonalities, but that's negligible.

Software development work is creative and more technical in nature. Development, support, improvement, and monitoring are important tasks for all software developers. The SE universities curriculum is more aligned with software or product development work and this education does not include anything about recruitment cycles or relevant soft skills. So when the software engineer leaves engineering college, he is naturally built to be a developer, not a recruiter.

For the recruiting profession, you need to be more polished on soft skills, such as being very strong in communication, daily follow-up and follow-up with candidates for closings, less technical knowledge is required just to understand the detailed job description, ability to filter candidates based on the company required demand, accurate management of supply and demand. Most of these are completely proven activities that software developers do on a daily basis.

It really is a bad idea to take on a recruiting role if you have a background in software development. See that you already have an academic and practical experience aligned with development, not recruitment. So you can always get ahead in the areas of testing, production support, data engineering, development operations, or legacy modernization, and there are many more available in the development field. To get into the recruiting role, ideally you should have completed any professional title in the human resources field that would have complimented you on the recruiting role. If you really have no other choice and if your job is at stake then ONLY go for the recruiter position, but trust me, You won't get job satisfaction if you are a developer and chances are high that you will get frustrated over and over again. looking for developer role.

There are several reasons mentioned below:

  1. The vacancy advertised by the recruiter can be bogus just to get enough resumes from the candidates and keep them for future requirements. You may get a call from the recruiter in the future if a vacancy arises and you find the most suitable candidate.
  2. Not enough jobs on the scoreboard. It was even before the Corona pandemic and now, during the Corona pandemic, the employment situation is worse. There are no jobs in the travel and tourism, hotel industry, airlines, media and entertainment, advertising, sports, and film production industry. There are still jobs in the information technology sector
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There are several reasons mentioned below:

  1. The vacancy advertised by the recruiter can be bogus just to get enough resumes from the candidates and keep them for future requirements. You may get a call from the recruiter in the future if a vacancy arises and you find the most suitable candidate.
  2. Not enough jobs on the scoreboard. It was even before the Corona pandemic and now, during the Corona pandemic, the employment situation is worse. There are no jobs in the travel and tourism, hotel industry, airlines, media and entertainment, advertising, sports, and film production industry. There are still jobs in IT sector (not related to the fields mentioned above), pharmaceutical industry, engineering / medical device manufacturing sectors, medical technology research and development companies, etc. There may also be other companies that have not been drastically affected by the pandemic such as the food industry and food processing and packaging. Therefore, it depends in which sector you are looking for work.
  3. Many candidates are applying for jobs now after the global recession and you are in the crowd. You must be patient and wait for your turn to come.
  4. Look for jobs only through references, as only those are genuine. The jobs that are advertised on the job portals are just advertising.
  5. Try joining a short career course related to your field to add to your resume and keep busy too.
  6. If you get the contact numbers from the recruiter or the companies, you should also call them after sharing your CV by mail to confirm if they have found your CV.

In the end, it is only a matter of time and having a little patience will help.

Generally speaking, you need to be cautiously open to recruiters' approaches.

Your best leads will come from people you know, but recruiters have a broader industry perspective than you do.

The problem that recruiters present alongside their broader industry perspective is that they don't really know you or what you really want the way a friend or former colleague does.

Beyond that, recruiters can fall into two stylistic categories. One category is the brutally honest, "You are a mediocre engineer with a mediocre career path and here is an opportunity that is the b

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Generally speaking, you need to be cautiously open to recruiters' approaches.

Your best leads will come from people you know, but recruiters have a broader industry perspective than you do.

The problem that recruiters present alongside their broader industry perspective is that they don't really know you or what you really want the way a friend or former colleague does.

Beyond that, recruiters can fall into two stylistic categories. One category is the brutally honest, "You are a mediocre engineer with a mediocre career path and this is an opportunity that is the best you will see in the next decade." The other category is the absurdly flattering: "You are a brilliant technologist and I think you will have spectacular success in this job."

Both approaches are dangerous: the brutally honest person can make you miserable with yourself, while the sycophantic can give you unrealistic expectations about you and your opportunities.

So remember that a recruiter doesn't really know you, so you should have a clear list of your requirements and priorities in your head or, better yet, in your hand when you speak to the recruiter.

Also, remember that you don't know the recruiter, so no matter how you talk about the opportunity, ask a lot of questions. If a friend or former colleague speaks up for an opportunity, she is putting her reputation on the line with you, so you have more context than if the advocate is a recruiter.

Varies ... Employment agencies negotiate agreements with each company they work with. There are so many different arrangements and variables that could affect the fee structure.

The following is a common structure:

  • Contract: Invoice 40% on the rate
  • Permanent placement: 15% - 20% one-time payment

Other variables:

  • Hiring volume can affect rates, for example, a staffing company that places a large volume of contractors may reduce its placement fee.
  • Exclusivity with a staffing agency may result in a reduced rate
  • Different types of roles and industries have different standards, for example, executive staffing tends
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Varies ... Employment agencies negotiate agreements with each company they work with. There are so many different arrangements and variables that could affect the fee structure.

The following is a common structure:

  • Contract: Invoice 40% on the rate
  • Permanent placement: 15% - 20% one-time payment

Other variables:

  • Hiring volume can affect rates, for example, a staffing company that places a large volume of contractors may reduce its placement fee.
  • Exclusivity with a staffing agency may result in a reduced rate
  • Different types of roles and industries have different standards - for example, executive staffing tends to charge huge fees for a placement.

Important consideration ...

Hiring:

Those fees may seem high, and I've heard of candidates who think the markup should be theirs. However, it is important to note that these margins cover the significant overheads that are absorbed by the staffing company rather than the placement company:

  • Time spent on hiring / administration / onboarding
  • Resources invested in the management of your company
  • Insurance and other expenses contracted by the contractor.
  • Maintain payroll
  • And many other expenses. The point is, the "40% markup" is not going to anyone's pocket.

Permanent placement:

In reality, it is to the advantage of the staffing agency to get the candidate to earn the highest salary possible. The agency is not paid out of the candidate's salary; the company pays them an additional fee proportional to the candidate's salary.

(This perspective comes from my time at a staffing agency and also on the corporate side, partnering with staffing providers.)

Yes, it is perfectly fine to get a job from a recruitment agency, as many multinational companies outsource recruitment to outside vendors. These agencies are very connected to Big Brands and work in exclusive positions.
Other than this, there is no harm, as you do not have to pay anything to these agencies, but you should be careful with consultants who charge to get your placement. Another advantage is that since they are very connected to HR, they keep a constant follow-up and receive updates on a regular basis.

The only downside I see is that sometimes the role may not be clearly dictated

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Yes, it is perfectly fine to get a job from a recruitment agency, as many multinational companies outsource recruitment to outside vendors. These agencies are very connected to Big Brands and work in exclusive positions.
Other than this, there is no harm, as you do not have to pay anything to these agencies, but you should be careful with consultants who charge to get your placement. Another advantage is that since they are very connected to HR, they keep a constant follow-up and receive updates on a regular basis.

The only downside I see is that sometimes these agencies may not clearly dictate the role as they are not concerned with the role you get. The main objective is to locate it.
Also, if you apply directly to the company, and since few companies have a very large database, your CV may get lost in that pool and recruiters may not have time to search.

All the best !!

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