How can a 13-year-old make money?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Tommy Lee



How can a 13-year-old make money?

When I was 12, I had 5 overworked brothers and sisters and parents. There was not enough money to pay our household bills, much less to give six of us per diem. It was obvious to me that I needed to find a job or I would be broke.

  • As I already took care of my siblings' children (all younger), the neighborhood mothers saw me responsibly taking care of my brothers and sisters and ASKED me to take care of the children. This ranged from part-time babysitting on Saturday night to a long-term job caring for 3 children from when they left school until a parent returned home. The pay wasn't A LOT then, but it was reasonable, and it's A LOT
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When I was 12, I had 5 overworked brothers and sisters and parents. There was not enough money to pay our household bills, much less to give six of us per diem. It was obvious to me that I needed to find a job or I would be broke.

  • As I already took care of my siblings' children (all younger), the neighborhood mothers saw me responsibly taking care of my brothers and sisters and ASKED me to take care of the children. This ranged from part-time babysitting on Saturday night to a long-term job caring for 3 children from when they left school until a parent returned home. The pay wasn't A LOT then, but it was reasonable, and it's MUCH better now.
  • Newspaper delivery. My brother had the route, but he usually asked me for help a couple of days a week. It means getting up early, EVERY day, and being in good shape. Try not to take too long a route - we had 68 people, too many for one person in northern CT where it is cold and hilly.
  • Work in the garden. These can be for 12 year old boys or girls. If you know how to use an electric lawn mower, string trimmer, etc., you can earn a good amount of cash, especially on smaller lawns that need maintenance, but the homeowner has no time or is older. Offer to wash the windows (this is harder than it sounds), so practice first, because you won't get paid for scratched windows, and when you find out how much effort it takes to clean a window, you'll know what to charge. In winter, the snow is removed.
  • Homework. Mother's helper. Again, it can be done by a boy or a girl. If a mom has a young child, or 2 or 3, and needs some time for herself, children are often better at involving other children, no matter how young, in projects and activities that give mom something. of time.
  • My mother did the house cleaning for her pocket money between the ages of 10 and 17. This was in a neighborhood of fanatically clean and frugal German housewives. It was not easy.
  • Laundry service: wash and fold clothes for others, if you have a washer and dryer at home. Make sure to give your parents some feedback as you raise your utility bills.
  • Walking dogs / caring for pets.
  • Collection of returnable cans and bottles. I know this is embarrassing for a 12 year old, but my brothers and I did it, we helped the environment and we made some money. In New York I see people of ALL ages doing it; some treat it like a regular job and pay their rent with it.

Hope these help. Post signs in your local library, grocery stores, wherever a lot of people gather. They are not as high-tech as some of the other jobs, but they are always needed. You can also leave flyers with all your information at the door of a neighborhood radio. If you know something about them, you will know which ones are most likely to need your services. Note: almost all adults hate washing windows and would pay others to do it.

Good luck on your first race and I hope they help you.

Disclaimer: I'm not sure what your gender is because you didn't specifically mention it, so I'll only write this answer from a children's point of view.

There are five main ways to earn money at age 13 that I know

  • Cut the grass. I know, I know, typical response, one you've probably already received from many others, but it really is a great first job. It requires little experience or skill, you have practically an infinite supply of grass to mow (I recommend if you ask enough and offer a reasonable price (or less than reasonable, you are only 13 years old after all), you will find many jobs), a
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Disclaimer: I'm not sure what your gender is because you didn't specifically mention it, so I'll only write this answer from a children's point of view.

There are five main ways to earn money at age 13 that I know

  • Cut the grass. I know, I know, typical response, one you've probably already received from many others, but it really is a great first job. It requires little experience or skill, you have practically an infinite supply of grass to mow (I recommend if you ask enough and offer a reasonable price (or less than reasonable, you are only 13 years old after all), you will find a lot of jobs), and you don't need too many expensive tools (you or this person probably already owns a lawn mower). However, it does have some downsides, which I will put in bullet form in each example.
    • Physical labor
    • It's not always the best pay
    • Can get boring and requires a vehicle (unless you're mowing your neighbors' grass)
  • Garage Sale. This is mainly if you need some quick cash for something and not a permanent job. Surely you have some old toys or clothes that you no longer use lying around your room. My friend in high school sold his entire collection of Pokémon cards along with his baby clothes once and made almost $ 200. Cons:
    • It could be difficult to convince your parents to let you do this.
    • You need semi-valuable feminine things to sell, people don't just buy junk
    • Need to live in a house; the apartment does not work
  • Ask your parents to give you an assignment. This is probably the simplest. Ask your parents if they would be willing to give you a weekly or monthly allowance. Tell them you will teach fiscal responsibility and offer to do more chores around the house to compensate. If they're still not budging, ask them to start small, maybe $ 1-3 a week, and save it all until you have enough for whatever you want (don't forget to put something in the bank, too). Just remember, your parents may not be able to afford this, so don't push too hard and be understanding if they say no. Cons:
    • Small amount of money over a long period of time
    • It may be necessary to convince your parents to pay you whatever
    • Not affordable for some families
  • Sell ​​things at school. This is probably the most lucrative of all the methods listed here. You can sell just about anything at school, whether it's candy, supplies, shoes, or even homework answers (not recommended, but hey, don't shoot the messenger). Just buy things from a super cheap connivance store, or from other people, such as shoes, and then sell them for a higher price. Easy profits, especially selling them to kids with parents who wouldn't let them buy that kind of thing normally. Cons:
    • 99.99% chance that it's not allowed in your school (but hey, that doesn't mean it's impossible to get away with it. Just be smart about it)
    • You'll need an older brother, a really laid-back parent, or another trusted older friend to buy things first, then give it to you to sell at school (remember to give them a few bucks if you have one of the 3)
    • Selling shoes and answers is quite risky
  • Get a traditional job. This is going to be the hardest, if not absolutely impossible, depending on where you live, thing to do. First, you will need a work permit from your school principal. You will need to make an appointment with him / her and tell him where you plan to work, how long you plan to work per week, and how it will affect your grades (you will need to maintain decent to good grades (B- to A + ish) if you want your principle to take this into account In addition to that, you will need to find a job suitable for children, such as transport tables, limited cooking, limited cleaning, theme park rides attendant, or parking attendant. Cons:
    • Much to convince both your parents and the school administrators that you are mature and responsible enough to get a job.
    • Find a place that hires a 13-year-old. (Just ask your favorite restaurants if they are hiring and during the interview try to act as mature and as mature as you can.)
    • Realize that this is a real life commitment, and that you won't have as much time to hang out with your friends or do other social / fun activities like that if you take this job.
    • Keeping your grades high

That's really all I could think of. If you are a girl, I am so sorry! I can't think of anything but babysitting (besides the list of kids) you can do, and I don't know enough about babysitting to say anything about it with any level of authority. Hope this helped!

Edition 1: spelling and grammar

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