Has Google ever hired someone in their 40s as a software engineer?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Cameron Harper



Has Google ever hired someone in their 40s as a software engineer?

Yes. I follow one of them.

John L. Miller

Of course, you are too old to join those companies. Do you think they are going to hire you walking with gray hair, a cane and asking when it's nap time? Do you think they want to be around someone who has to go to the bathroom more than twice a day? Friend, you are a fossil. It is time to think about retirement. Coding skill starts to decline around 35. How are you going to work 12 hours a day and on weekends with your wife and kids? Brother, you don't know that no one at FB, MSFT, Google, and Apple has kids, do you? If you do, you get fired (it's part of the deal when you get hired). Do you think someone there will want?

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Of course, you are too old to join those companies. Do you think they are going to hire you walking with gray hair, a cane and asking when it's nap time? Do you think they want to be around someone who has to go to the bathroom more than twice a day? Friend, you are a fossil. It is time to think about retirement. Coding skill starts to decline around 35. How are you going to work 12 hours a day and on weekends with your wife and kids? Brother, you don't know that no one at FB, MSFT, Google, and Apple has kids, do you? If you do, you get fired (it's part of the deal when you get hired). You think everyone will want to hear about your family and your boring life when what you should be doing is programming, having fun, and traveling the world to find your zen. Code, curls and girls === life. And what about all the free food and sodas that you can't take advantage of because you have to eat healthy because of your age? You'll be a social outcast if you don't live off French fries, ramen, chocolate, soda, protein drinks, and Soylent. Do you drink brah? Do you even play binary beer pong? How are you going to swallow those beers with your 35 year old liver? I bet that organ is on life support at such an old age. You also can't drink 10 Red Bulls a day, as you probably have diabetes. Even if he was hired, I doubt he has the respect of his colleagues (who will be 29 years old at the most). How are you going to communicate with them unless you have WhatsApp, Snapchat, and an Instagram account? Do you think they will accept you and your outdated Facebook account? By the way, you have a Tesla, truth? I can't drive to work without one of those. Don't set out to be a loser. Step aside and let 23 year olds code and code frequently as you go 127.0.0.1.

Please ignore the previous paragraph.

No, you are not too old to work in those places at 35. You will be fine at 35. You will probably be fine until 60 working in those companies. You can work anywhere, anytime, and at any age (although you may have to deal with some age discrimination). Just stay healthy, learn things, and find someone to settle down with. That is practically life. FYI, I am 30 years old and I am still a software engineer at MSFT.

Warning: I wouldn't consider myself older (I'm 40), but my age is usually in the "upper end" on any team I've worked with at Google. I am currently the second oldest person on my team. There are some people who appear to be over 50 in my immediate neighborhood, and at least one over 60 (hard to tell, I don't usually ask people about their age).

tl; dr: there is no age discrimination on Google and there are no limits.

I don't think there is age discrimination per se at Google. I've never seen someone get bullied, excluded from an interesting project, or lose a promotion because of their age. There is definitely no limit, if you pass the ba

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Warning: I wouldn't consider myself older (I'm 40), but my age is usually in the "upper end" on any team I've worked with at Google. I am currently the second oldest person on my team. There are some people who appear to be over 50 in my immediate neighborhood, and at least one over 60 (hard to tell, I don't usually ask people about their age).

tl; dr: there is no age discrimination on Google and there are no limits.

I don't think there is age discrimination per se at Google. I've never seen someone get bullied, excluded from an interesting project, or lose a promotion because of their age. There's definitely no limit - if you pass the bar, you'll be hired no matter your age and won't be fired as long as you keep acting (and possibly a bit longer). Nor do I think it is an obstacle to getting an interview.

But there is something more subtle that makes working at a company like Google harder as you get older: People are often the same age as seniority.

Many will implicitly assume that you are more experienced because you seem older, even if you are just starting out and don't know anything yet. And of course, with more experience, you are likely to be hired at a higher level (eg, Level 5, aka "Senior Software Engineer"), which can add a lot of pressure, especially in the first few months. Having a lot of experience doesn't magically make you learn Google's (unique) systems faster, after all. There is also an explicit expectation that you will exhibit a constant growth curve, that is, you must show that you keep getting better as you gain (even more) experience. But at an older age you are probably closer to your "peak" performance and it is much more difficult to visibly improve from that.

In other words, it can be difficult to live up to expectations - while you may easily outgrow that inexperienced 25-year-old who started at the same time as you, that won't get you very far because the 25-year-old was hired at level 3 and they hired you at level 5, so you actually have to beat them to keep your job. And that 25-year-old will continue to improve at a rapid rate ...

One final aspect is that as I got older, I began to value my work-life balance much more. I have a family and social life, and I am not willing to work weekends and nights, and sometimes it is frustrating to be compared to those twenty-somethings who spend their entire lives at work.

Some good answers here in the 40-50 age group. But what about 65? Did that age / number make you cringe? Token companies like AT&T and GE over 60 just don't exist, they've been laid off a long time ago. Especially IBM. But the same for almost all IT bodies actually.

You have to admit that a 65-year-old IT guy is certainly broad. I was there, I did that. Some cohorts take it proudly as a resource for wisdom and practical knowledge. Some just think that older people stink, don't bathe, fart, can't hear, can't see, and are generally weak and weak. And a lot of my 66-year-old friends really do. But i look like me

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Some good answers here in the 40-50 age group. But what about 65? Did that age / number make you cringe? Token companies like AT&T and GE over 60 just don't exist, they've been laid off a long time ago. Especially IBM. But the same for almost all IT bodies actually.

You have to admit that a 65-year-old IT guy is certainly broad. I was there, I did that. Some cohorts take it proudly as a resource for wisdom and practical knowledge. Some just think that older people stink, don't bathe, fart, can't hear, can't see, and are generally weak and weak. And a lot of my 66-year-old friends really do. But I look like 45 years old, I have been blessed with a baby face. I am healthy and ready. And I'm bringing ~ 30 years of experience to the table that just can't be overlooked.

I'm 65 years old and I'm going to a 2 cd round of face-to-face interviews with Google here in Texas. Why? Specifically because I want to work for Google. Not MS, AWS, IBM, HP, Dell, whoever. Just Google. ~ 30 years in IT with a flawless background (it's hard to find people at 65 without skeletons of * some * kind in the closest). Will my age get in the way? Probably. Millennials don't like father figures like their co-workers. Then we'll see.

Damn few.

And that's not just software engineers, it's company-wide. Google has grown so fast that it has taken on many entry-level positions, but hiring high-level people, especially with a background in finance, e-commerce, or telecommunications, is not something Google typically does. And Google, in general, does not have a 40/50/60 year old employee count.

When I was working in the New York office this was a problem, because the typical New York engineer / engineering director / senior product manager did not come from a start-up online environment (think finance, healthcare, publishing, me

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Damn few.

And that's not just software engineers, it's company-wide. Google has grown so fast that it has taken on many entry-level positions, but hiring high-level people, especially with a background in finance, e-commerce, or telecommunications, is not something Google typically does. And Google, in general, does not have a 40/50/60 year old employee count.

When I was working in the New York office this was a problem, because the typical New York engineer / engineering director / senior product manager did not come from a start-up online environment (think finance, healthcare, publishing, media). ), and hiring those people was really difficult ... I just didn't fit the Google mold. So few were hired.

Now Google is getting old, hell Larry Page is 46 years old, so maybe he is something more than 40 years old.

Thanks for A2A.

To be frank, the way you put it, it doesn't sound very promising.

Simply ask "Does Google hire people with no work experience?"

Google jobs are very competitive, and even to get an interview, you must have something to show: a degree in a relevant field, work experience, or other compelling evidence like contributions to an open source project or a book you've published.

Being over 40 shouldn't be a problem. The biggest hurdle of being a little older

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Thanks for A2A.

To be frank, the way you put it, it doesn't sound very promising.

Simply ask "Does Google hire people with no work experience?"

Google jobs are very competitive, and even to get an interview, you must have something to show: a degree in a relevant field, work experience, or other compelling evidence like contributions to an open source project or a book you've published.

Being over 40 shouldn't be a problem. The biggest hurdle to being a little older when applying on Google is that the expectations are proportionally higher.

You will have to apply. That is a difficult requirement.

I was 50 when Google hired me. He had decades of experience building software, but it was on platforms Google doesn't use. I did not have (and still do not have) a college degree.

But I was lucky. They assigned me a very, very good recruiter. She looked at my resume and realized that while I understood the story it was telling, a Google hiring committee would have trouble with it and helped me rewrite it so I wouldn't confuse them. He stayed on top of the extremely unstable manager who oversaw the position I was hired for and made sure that I g

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You will have to apply. That is a difficult requirement.

I was 50 when Google hired me. He had decades of experience building software, but it was on platforms Google doesn't use. I did not have (and still do not have) a college degree.

But I was lucky. They assigned me a very, very good recruiter. She looked at my resume and realized that while I understood the story it was telling, a Google hiring committee would have trouble with it and helped me rewrite it so I wouldn't confuse them. He stayed on top of the extremely unstable manager overseeing the position I was hired for and made sure that this guy didn't screw anything up. He trained me before a critical final interview to understand what the interviewer would really be looking for. (No, he did not give me answers to the questions they were going to ask me).

I can't tell you how to assign a good recruiter to your case. But I think that, on a first approximation, anyone who goes through the Google hiring process is lucky. (There are a lot of good people we don't hire. Many of them are people we should have.) You may be as lucky as I am.

Yes. I was 41 when I started.

The interview process is not very friendly for the elderly because it is actually focused on verifying that you can code and solve design problems. Many older folks are perfectly capable but too rusty so you should probably do a review.

I did, but I had been doing mostly actual coding at that stage as well, so I was pretty up to date.

I don't think there is any problem joining 40 as a junior programmer. With that being said, I joined the seniors as a senior programmer, and I believe the oldest junior programmer I have seen was in his 30s.

The most important thing is to have the skills and knowledge to be hired at the level they need. I suspect he could be 60 years old and fresh out of college, and if he could pass an interview in Newhire, he could get in.

I am a 38 year old developer, and I am thriving in the role of "senior developer", which by the way is ultimately indistinguishable from "architect" (both are confusing). Like another respondent, I actually find myself sharing my knowledge and energy more in the team, such as advising them on reactive programming and quality in the software, something that is facilitated by programming in pairs and code reviews. I think Software Developer is a long-term job, Architect being just an experienced developer with some availability to train and advise others, something that is not difficult to develop over time.

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I am a 38 year old developer, and I am thriving in the role of "senior developer", which by the way is ultimately indistinguishable from "architect" (both are confusing). Like another respondent, I actually find myself sharing my knowledge and energy more in the team, such as advising them on reactive programming and quality in the software, something that is facilitated by programming in pairs and code reviews. I think Software Developer is a long-term job, Architect being just an experienced developer with some availability to train and advise others, something that is not difficult to develop over time. Something that seems important to me is keeping my passion alive and finding related areas of interest that I can develop further. It is true that one develops or loses momentum, there is no "sustaining momentum". This helps?

I'm an engineer at Google and I'm on the steering committee of a group called "Greyglers." We do not have a formal age limit, but based on interaction with many of my peers, I estimate that I am an average age for a Greygler. I am over 50 years old. I hope I have answered your question!

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