Has anyone made a career change from accounting to something else? If so, what was it?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Branden Walton



Has anyone made a career change from accounting to something else? If so, what was it?

I am a CPA with approximately ten years of experience in the industry. During my time in the field, I spent the first five years of my career in auditing / consulting, then moved to the corporate side, working for various non-profit organizations for the last five years, my most recent job was at the level of Comptroller.

Throughout my accounting career, I was a perennial "job seeker." My longest stint in any company was about three years, and I finally realized that I was never going to find an Accounting job where I was really happy or satisfied, simply because I hated working in Accounting. Some folks are fine spending

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I am a CPA with approximately ten years of experience in the industry. During my time in the field, I spent the first five years of my career in auditing / consulting, then moved to the corporate side, working for various non-profit organizations for the last five years, my most recent job was at the level of Comptroller.

Throughout my accounting career, I was a perennial "job seeker." My longest stint in any company was about three years, and I finally realized that I was never going to find an Accounting job where I was really happy or satisfied, simply because I hated working in Accounting. Some people are fine spending most of their time behind an Excel spreadsheet, but for me it was a miserable and crushing job that was affecting my sanity. I decided to leave my position as a controller with nothing prepared to weigh my options.

I ended up falling into the Accounting and Finance recruiting almost by accident, and it's one of the best career decisions I've ever made. I work for a large national agency where I am the main responsible for the development of new businesses in my market. My job is to identify companies that might be in the market for our services, establish relationships with the key decision makers in those companies, and partner with them to find key Accounting and Finance talents to meet their hiring needs. Having previous experience in Accounting has been a huge asset both because of my network and because I have a deep understanding of the roles I recruit for, so I have been able to start seeing financial success fairly quickly.

Recruiting is not for everyone, it is largely a Sales role. Depending on the agency you go to, you will be paid based on a commission structure or 100% commission with a sweepstakes. Like any sales function, you have to learn to overcome a large number of rejections on a daily basis, and there are a ton of variables in every deal you work on, each of which has the potential to sink the deal. But the feeling of closing a deal is absolutely exhilarating! This is an industry where you can't go too high on the highs or too low on the lows.

Personally, I love getting up to work every day, something I could never say about my accounting career.

I made a change from being a CPA / Controller to a completely different career as a career strategist.

In my case, accounting was not something that I liked very much, nor did I find it interesting, but fear and good pay kept me paralyzed for more than 25 years. I finally got to the point where I couldn't bear the thought of doing accounting work for another day and decided to make a change.

The hard part for me was figuring out what I wanted to do. So I spent a good amount of time doing introspection, self-assessments, etc. and I realized that what I want to do is help people like me.

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I made a change from being a CPA / Controller to a completely different career as a career strategist.

In my case, accounting was not something that I liked very much, nor did I find it interesting, but fear and good pay kept me paralyzed for more than 25 years. I finally got to the point where I couldn't bear the thought of doing accounting work for another day and decided to make a change.

The hard part for me was figuring out what I wanted to do. So I spent a lot of time doing introspection, self-assessments, etc. And I realized that what I want to do is help people like me, people who are unhappy and feel stuck in their careers. I use the process I went through to help others turn their careers around, except it doesn't take them years to figure things out the way I did! I am much happier in my new career and wish I had made the change sooner. This career is quite different from my previous career in accounting, but the transition was not very difficult because the job is very interesting to me.

I know of others who have moved from accounting to a more financial role, a similar job but with numerous differences.

Also keep in mind that you have skills that you can use in any career, not just accounting. The key to your change is that no matter what you turn to, make sure that you will be doing the work you love and that it is geared toward your unique strengths. And trust me, it's never too late to make that change!

Better for you!

I loved my job as an FCA and my qualification allowed me to combine my passion for travel with my love for numbers and forays into the industry and the Big 4 globally, but I got to a point where there were no more challenges and I felt that it was time. to allow my more creative side to have a chance to breathe, but I also loved my job.

My first foray outside the business world was as a consultant in my area of ​​expertise and I had the opportunity to work with companies that could not afford a Big 4 firm but needed the guidance. It was a short-term plan as I returned to get new credentials for my new career.

Yes

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I loved my job as an FCA and my qualification allowed me to combine my passion for travel with my love for numbers and forays into the industry and the Big 4 globally, but I got to a point where there were no more challenges and I felt that it was time. to allow my more creative side to have a chance to breathe, but I also loved my job.

My first foray outside the business world was as a consultant in my area of ​​expertise and I had the opportunity to work with companies that could not afford a Big 4 firm but needed the guidance. It was a short-term plan as I returned to get new credentials for my new career.

I finally launched my coaching practice and the initial focus was on stress management for career professionals, but the clients I was getting wanted career coaching and, 2 years after my new job, I changed my focus to Career and Presence Coaching. executive. I continue to provide guidance for stress management using metaphysical tools, but that is part of the training package.

I love my new job. Although I must point out, the transition from a salary package to being self-employed is not necessarily an easy journey and even the best of us have to grapple with our comfort zone and mindset, but it is a journey worth undertaking.

I'm sure someone has successfully made a career change from accounting to something else. I would guess that accounting folks will explore other areas but always keep one foot in the accounting world.

Personally, I got cold trying to get out of the accounting world. I left the big 4 firm to do something more exciting. I started getting involved in real estate, then ran back to my comfort zone. The real estate industry is poised for disruption, but I opted to alter the accounting space.

I went from Accounting and Finance to Financial Systems. That was the best move I made in my career. Once I made the switch, I realized that I loved being a subject matter expert working with IT to solve technical problems and provide better systems and processes for finance users.

Most IT people don't like finance and vice versa. That made me extremely marketable. I was able to speak both the language of finance and IT and loved it.

It became my "sweet spot".

As a result, my career skyrocketed.

I hope this helps.

I made a career change from Accounting to Information Technology after 22 years in the Accounting field. I enjoyed the accounting work I did, but I felt that computers were significantly more exciting. I had the opportunity when the company I was with decided to automate one of the accounting systems for which it was responsible. I spent the next 27 years in various aspects of IT.

He had always wanted to be a lawyer. My memory is that I decided this when I was a senior in high school. I graduated from law school 20 years after earning a degree in accounting.

No. But I try to live a life free of regrets.

I decided early on that I wanted to work with small entities and offer my best advice based on my interactions with thousands of similar types of organizations. This is what I have learned and I think it helps me enjoy being an accountant in public practice.

  1. Most people who start a business are technicians and have no idea of ​​the greater needs of running an organization. You cannot change your nature; all you can do is try to steer them in the general direction of staying out of trouble.
  2. The more leverage involved, the greater the degree of going
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No. But I try to live a life free of regrets.

I decided early on that I wanted to work with small entities and offer my best advice based on my interactions with thousands of similar types of organizations. This is what I have learned and I think it helps me enjoy being an accountant in public practice.

  1. Most people who start a business are technicians and have no idea of ​​the greater needs of running an organization. You cannot change your nature; all you can do is try to steer them in the general direction of staying out of trouble.
  2. The higher the leverage, the greater the degree of irresponsibility of management. Leverage in this case is the use of other people's money, not just borrowed money. All you can do is identify the risk for those who have an appetite to lose money at the remote chance of finding the only investment that is worth it.
  3. You will be thrown under the bus at the first opportunity to be blamed on you. It is not personal, it is a survival instinct. If you are willing to accept the risk of being blamed, be sure to charge the customer enough to compensate them for the hours that you will later spend defending their actions and pointing out the obvious flaws in your business logic. $ 800 per hour is not an unreasonable charge for those customers.
  4. Admit every mistake you make, even if it's trivial. Nothing helps you position yourself as an honest information provider than admitting you were wrong a dozen times in the past week and yet you came through. Also, even if you are never wrong, no one will believe you anyway and just think you are a braggart.
  5. Rules of judgment. In the absence of other information, your judgment is superior to that of your clients, especially when it comes to how people behave regarding money and finances. But follow rule number 4, as no one likes to be reminded that they don't understand logic.
  6. Find a hobby. I paint miniatures, mostly from the Napoleonic era, and it's a great way to just forget all the idiocy of my time.
  7. Don't take it too seriously. This may upset some, but business is a game. You are the scorer (internal accountant) or the referee (independent accountant). At the end of it all, it's always someone else's decision to screw up the business model. Ours is simply to report on it. As the old saying goes, the last to go out of business in bankruptcy are the lawyers and accountants; one to turn off the lights and the other to close the door.

And yes, when I felt exhausted, I took a 5-year license. There comes a time when it comes to you and it is up to you to recognize it and find something else. It is not the occupation that you regret, it is not taking responsibility for choosing to be an accountant that gets you at all times.

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Here's the lowdown on accounting. They are not the boring numbers that everyone thinks of. Yes, there are accountants who deal with accounting books and such, but accounting is a huge field. Some of the subfields that are included in accounting are auditors, forensic accountants, payroll, general ledger, consultants, and many, many areas.

Unlike some fields, accountants are unlikely to be outsourced or replaced by computers. Yes, accounting software has automated much of what accountants typically do, but humans will never trust software to fully control it. They will always want a human to double check

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Here's the lowdown on accounting. They are not the boring numbers that everyone thinks of. Yes, there are accountants who deal with accounting books and such, but accounting is a huge field. Some of the subfields that are included in accounting are auditors, forensic accountants, payroll, general ledger, consultants, and many, many areas.

Unlike some fields, accountants are unlikely to be outsourced or replaced by computers. Yes, accounting software has automated much of what accountants typically do, but humans will never trust software to fully control it. They will always want a human to double check the software.

At the same time, corporate leaders will always want to keep the people who handle money close. There is little chance that they will outsource accounting or auditing to a third world country to save a few bucks. Answer customer questions can go to Bangladesh; the people who prepare our finances should stay close to where I can keep an eye on them.

Much of finance is being automated. Many financial investors realize that they cannot beat the market and are buying index funds. In fact, on my 401K, all of my retirement is in various index funds because they have the lowest rates and show the highest overall returns. No human needs to even look at them, as a computer can handle it.

So what is the end of the game for someone with an accounting degree? That depends on where you want to finish, what education you have, and what certifications you acquire. I am an internal auditor and I am studying for my Certified Internal Auditor certification. In my career path, I can easily end up as a director of internal audit. By doing the right policy in the right company, I could become Vice President of Internal Audit (if the company has the position). If you received your CPA certification (in the US), you could easily become a controller, CFO, or even president of a company. With your CPA, you can also join an accounting firm and end up as a partner, or start your own firm and control it all.

I was an accountant for about 2 years after graduating from college. I graduated with a degree in Finance (bachelor's degree) and I couldn't find a job as a financial analyst, and I got into accounting.

I wasn't happy as an accountant, and I certainly didn't want to pay for programming school after spending nearly $ 200,000 on my finance degree.

I was in a difficult situation.

But it was really just a perception. (All of these companies that hire programmers compete and are simply looking for someone who can do the job.)

I worked as an accountant for Arrow Electronics, which is a very large and intense corporation. But after

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I was an accountant for about 2 years after graduating from college. I graduated with a degree in Finance (bachelor's degree) and I couldn't find a job as a financial analyst, and I got into accounting.

I wasn't happy as an accountant, and I certainly didn't want to pay for programming school after spending nearly $ 200,000 on my finance degree.

I was in a difficult situation.

But it was really just a perception. (All of these companies that hire programmers compete and are simply looking for someone who can do the job.)

I worked as an accountant for Arrow Electronics, which is a very large and intense corporation. But after work, I went to Fiverr and paid around $ 10 an hour to learn people's programming (in many different countries, but they all spoke English).

I started with HTML / CSS, then moved to JavaScript, and once I got comfortable with JavaScript, I moved to PHP.

This is a great flow for learning the basics of development (both early and late); After learning these languages, you can basically program in any language.

The key is not to give up your accounting job so that you focus on getting better every day after work (your job reminds you what you're working for), but finding an app you want to build (a personal inspiration) is also equally important.

Work on your application with the help of your Fivverr or online tutors, and watch your application grow and your skills increase.

Then, when you feel comfortable (for me it was about 4-5 months), you look for companies that are hiring developers and you put your request on your resume, in detail. Then, in the interview, you explain your application to the interviewer and he will “see” that you really know how to program and will hire you.

My first job as a developer paid around 40,000. However, 9 months later, I am now a senior software engineer (Javascript / c #) working in the city and making almost double.

Good luck.

PS: I hope you never lose sight of your original inspiration.

I am writing this after reading all the answers so far under this question.

I have noticed many responses mentioning that they love their job as accountants. Not that I mean to prove them wrong, but YES, I agree with the question that most accountants hate their job because of my 10 years in this profession. Note that out of these 10 years, I was in public accounting for 7 years, which means that I have interacted with a large number of accountants from my client's businesses during my career. I can attest that most of them hate their job too.

The statistics were established, turning to the important question here “Why?

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I am writing this after reading all the answers so far under this question.

I have noticed many responses mentioning that they love their job as accountants. Not that I mean to prove them wrong, but YES, I agree with the question that most accountants hate their job because of my 10 years in this profession. Note that out of these 10 years, I was in public accounting for 7 years, which means that I have interacted with a large number of accountants from my client's businesses during my career. I can attest that most of them hate their job too.

The statistics leveled off, moving on to the important question here "Why do they hate their jobs?" Some of the users here correctly answer that it's not the job, it's the organization and the people. I agree 100% with this.

So why do so many accountants have so many bad people around them?

The real problem is the IGNORANCE of the people. What people don't realize is that all the information they want from their accountants comes with effort and cost (which none of them are willing to pay or even contemplate). You don't pay for the peanuts and ask for caviar. Some of my clients who used part-time accounting services asked me for reports as if they were paying for SAP or Oracle ERP systems that can generate any report they can think of. And if they don't get the information they need, they underestimate the contribution of the accountant. Accountants who volunteer to deliver any necessary information spoil their supervisors, who end up overburdening the hapless accountant.

Another reason people get their accountants wrong is to merge management work with accounts. Administration work is often so closely related to accounts that people often forget to differentiate them, and accountants, more often than not, do. Say, for example: pay electric bills, phone bills, disburse wages, measure employee times, follow up with agents to get money, hire suppliers, control expenses, file government complaints, etc. These tasks have nothing to do with accounting, but their It is difficult for accountants to say no to these tasks and they end up overloaded with a non-accounting job. After all,

I remember during my years of training as a student, one of my teachers mockingly explained to us how the government amends the tax laws for anything and everything they want to achieve. To boost tourism, they modify tax laws to grant tax exemptions to tourism businesses. To improve performance at the Olympic games, they grant tax breaks to sports companies. To discourage pollution, they add taxes to entities that contribute to pollution. It's funny how the government thinks that anything can be achieved by modifying the tax laws. The same goes for companies. Many times when the Company is in a difficult position, they blame the accounts. Expenses out of control !!! Why didn't the accountant warn us? Agents defaulting on payments !!! Why didn't the accounts do due diligence? Some products are not selling well! Why don't accountants advise us? Employees are late for work! Accountants, please deduct the hours of the month the Employee was late. Pending government procedures !!! Accountants, please speed up. I cannot say what it is like in western countries, but here in Asia it is common to see this happen in all organizations.

These people have polluted, intoxicated, and belittled the beautiful profession of accounting. They are too ignorant to see the valuable benefits to their organization if they nurture and support a healthy accounting practice.

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