Has anyone gotten a job on Indeed.com?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Cain Jacobson



Has anyone gotten a job on Indeed.com?

I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent Acquisition Managers and Internal Recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get an idea of ​​how

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I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent acquisition managers and internal recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get a feel for candidates. As someone mentioned, there are no filters or restrictions for submitting a resume to a job posting on a job site. In fact, LinkedIn does not select a candidate, although now they have started adding criteria questions that help eliminate a good part of the demographic. But for most, it is a generic entry for submitting a resume. And anyone can do it. Indeed and LinkedIn also have an "easy app", which functionally simplifies candidate presentation. Basically, you pre-upload your resume and submit it with a click of the button. But on the other hand, he's shooting darts in the dark. A candidate can submit endless resumes for a position, hoping to find one that sticks but usually doesn't.

In my opinion, the best approach to finding a new role that has consistently worked for me is three-fold:

  1. Outside Recruiters - No matter how much you think a broker representing you doesn't quite reflect your work experience, they are your ticket to a potential opportunity. Many medium and large companies have expenses allocated to outsourcing (third party) fees. They realize that much of the work needs to be done regarding the screening of new and potential candidates on the front-end and can provide recruiters with a list of prerequisites, requirements, and preferences. That saves them a lot of time, hassle and work as they can now deal with candidates who will likely be qualified. Depending on your industry, look for a handful of recruitment agencies / staffing and network consulting services. Let them know that you are looking for new roles. Even if it is entry level, A recruiter is going to know the roles in a company before they hit the job sites. They tend to have relationships with them that give them an advantage. The best thing is that if you build a connection with them, they will constantly be looking for new roles for you even if you are not looking, which ironically seems to be the best time to land a new role.
  2. Apply directly on the company's website; If you find a job opening that matches your interests and qualifications on any of the employment social sites, go directly to the company's website and apply. This bypasses many of the hurdles that you would get from a site like Monster and posts your resume with the appropriate staff or internal recruiters. It is much more direct and effective.
  3. Email internal recruiters directly; this is a bit more difficult, but it has become much more prevalent. If you will notice on LinkedIn, there are many jobs that are posted, but some are posted by internal recruiters, such as HR. Your name, email address, and sometimes phone numbers are provided to you. That is your best chance, as you can be sure that your resume will go directly to the person you are working for a position. Provide a cover letter, be personal by addressing them by name, and send it out. 9 times out of 10, the HR recruiter will thank you for the submission, which helps significantly.

I moved to the US around 2017 and all the jobs I got ended. In fact, I got a job where I was 100% sure it was a scam to steal my information, but I just made the moves just in case it was real. The work was too good to be true (I thought). The day shift in a factory paid 50% more than any other recruiter and the people I interacted with gave me an address that I couldn't find online and a website / CEO that I couldn't find or verify. I won't say which one, but they also had very thick accents which are synonymous with popular scams in the US I showed up for work the day they told me and my name

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I moved to the US around 2017 and all the jobs I got ended. In fact, I got a job where I was 100% sure it was a scam to steal my information, but I just made the moves just in case it was real. The work was too good to be true (I thought). The day shift in a factory paid 50% more than any other recruiter and the people I interacted with gave me an address that I couldn't find online and a website / CEO that I couldn't find or verify. I won't say which one, but they also had very thick accents which are synonymous with popular scams in the US I got to work the day they told me and my name wasn't on any of the lists, they had to get a supervisor who looked so confused like me and told me to come back tomorrow. I showed up the next day and the orientation got my badge and still thought they were ripping me off. It wasn't until I got my first check, which was 50% sure everyone else's, did I trust the company. In short, yes. In fact, I've gotten a lot of jobs.

P.S. Check your state / city unemployment website for jobs! Those jobs are verified and hired quickly. You can even sort by salary.

I have hired about 50 employees over the last 5 years, and I would say at least 1000 interviews in that time frame.

All of this through Indeed, with almost no luck on any other platform. There are no applicants, and applicants are generally not the right fit, so it's a waste of time for both of you.

If I were to guess why others aren't that great, it would come down to their business models and the fact that they try too hard to do things differently, where Indeed just works more like a dashboard or social media platform. which simply allows employers to see their history clearly and employees see the work

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I have hired about 50 employees over the last 5 years, and I would say at least 1000 interviews in that time frame.

All of this through Indeed, with almost no luck on any other platform. There are no applicants, and applicants are generally not the right fit, so it's a waste of time for both of you.

If I were to guess why others aren't that great, it would come down to their business models and the fact that they try too hard to do things differently, where Indeed just works more like a dashboard or social media platform. It simply allows employers to see their history clearly and employees see the job title as simple as they do.

In fact, it's the place employers need to go, so it should be your destination as an employee.

With that said, if you are having difficulty as a job seeker getting a call back, I have a couple of recommendations.

  1. Make your resume simple and easy to read, with highlights rather than lengthy descriptions.
  2. Also, don't shrink too much, a good resume is about 1 1/2 page long and shows bullet points for your job duties at the previous job, with a short job description that needs to be better defined if they are lesser known titles or companies.

However, I don't know the answer. In fact, the company posted a vacancy on its site. For months! Finally, I called to see if the company was interested in hiring a search company to complete the search. I knew it was a long shot, but I thought, why not? The office staff who answered the phones were very rude when I explained who I wanted to speak to and why. Although rudeness doesn't affect me, when I finally found an email address for the person in charge of the position, my follow-up was totally ignored. So that was my experience with Indeed Corporate.

In this case, if someone only had one

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However, I don't know the answer. In fact, the company posted a vacancy on its site. For months! Finally, I called to see if the company was interested in hiring a search company to complete the search. I knew it was a long shot, but I thought, why not? The office staff who answered the phones were very rude when I explained who I wanted to speak to and why. Although rudeness doesn't affect me, when I finally found an email address for the person in charge of the position, my follow-up was totally ignored. So that was my experience with Indeed Corporate.

In this case, if someone had just said "Thanks, but we don't use search companies." I would have felt better. So naaaaawww, aside from the tracks every now and then, I wouldn't waste my time. And I write it with an attitude of bitter grapes.

Yes. I think it is one of the best sites that collects job listings on the Internet. I have been confirmed by other professional advisers that Indeed is the most helpful. However, I would not rely solely on one website. You would combine the job application through Indeed with other sources such as LinkedIn, going directly to the sites of the companies you have targeted, Craigslist, and most importantly, making real-life connections with other people. I don't like networking events, instead I do what I love and that's how I get to know others. Last week I attended a Meetup (www.meetup.com) and met 2 software eng

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Yes. I think it is one of the best sites that collects job listings on the Internet. I have been confirmed by other professional advisers that Indeed is the most helpful. However, I would not rely solely on one website. You would combine the job application through Indeed with other sources such as LinkedIn, going directly to the sites of the companies you have targeted, Craigslist, and most importantly, making real-life connections with other people. I don't like networking events, instead I do what I love and that's how I get to know others. Last week I attended a Meetup (www.meetup.com) and met 2 software engineers from major companies and someone from the healthcare industry! Starting and cultivating relationships is one of the best ways to get a good job because those people have more influence.

Yes, I have done it for a government body ... and for the job that I have worked for the last 5 years.

The latter is a recruitment agency, by the way, and we use Indeed to hire A LOT… Considering that our business is based on getting quality candidates, I can guarantee you that Indeed is just a job board that hosts job postings.

If they do not accept you, it is due to many things, the two main ones are:

  1. You are not suitable for the position / your application was not strong enough.
  2. The hiring company has already found someone / has not removed the ad / or they do not communicate badly.

Since the coronavirus, I've actually been, career builder, etc. and I get messages that someone has looked at my resume and applications, then nothing! No calls, no emails, no texts.

I think it is false.

I wonder how much money they will pay to those actors who said they hired them just because. I am extremely qualified for many professions, but I have not had anyone to hire me.

If you get a job because of, I would really like to hear from you. Thanks

Yes. I prefer to work remotely and use Indeed for many of my potential clients for remote work. Unlike other big job boards, Indeed labels each remote position as "remote" or "work from home" so you don't have to search the entire job description to find out if it really is a remote position.

Indeed also has a cool funnel system so you can keep track of your job search. Move jobs into the "Interested" and "Requested" and "Interviews" and "Hired" folders as you progress through the job search funnel.

You can check out this 5 minute video tutorial to see how easy it is to find and apply for remote jobs on Indeed.

Thank you for asking your question: "Has anyone found a job through Indeed?"

I applied, was interviewed, and was offered a job on Indeed. I think you have seen Indeed as one of the ways you search for work. I don't believe in depending on only one way. Get online as much as you can and do a job search engine (or 2, 3, 4 or more).

As for the type of jobs on Indeed they are likely to fill, they are jobs where the skills and requirements are so specific that only a few people can fulfill them.

Best of luck

In fact, many people got their jobs using. com (including me). Last year I posted my resume indeed. com as a joke, I had never used the site before and after hearing it from friends. The next day someone indeed. com contacted me to discuss working in fact. com. I have been there since May 2017.

Sorry no they don't and Indeed won't give you the stats. Google Indeed and reviews or complaints. Go to the Better Business Bureau and find them

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