For how long does a large technology company (Google, Amazon, FB, ...) usually keep a job offer while I wait for responses from other companies?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Archie Poole



For how long does a large technology company (Google, Amazon, FB, ...) usually keep a job offer while I wait for responses from other companies?

Big companies don't usually look for anything else. If they want you now, they will want you in a few months. Unless they give you a specific credible reason why they need an answer now, take the time to make the right decision.

The director level and senior positions are different, but they are difficult to fill and therefore rarely rush.

A few days at the most. They don't want to lose their other potential candidates if you finally reject them.

Once you've signed on to Google's offer, a number of magical things happen.

A fleet of self-driving cars pull up next to you as you walk home and shoot confetti out of the exhaust pipes. Loon's internet balloons descend from the sky with "Congratulations!" printed on them and gifts attached. Then you get $ 50 of Google Voice International Calling Credit, two T-shirts, and a lifetime subscription to Google Shopping Express.

Ok, I'm kidding about all of that. (I know, I wish it was true). This is what actually happens:

(1) If you have not yet chosen a team, you can choose

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Once you've signed on to Google's offer, a number of magical things happen.

A fleet of self-driving cars pull up next to you as you walk home and shoot confetti out of the exhaust pipes. Loon's internet balloons descend from the sky with "Congratulations!" printed on them and gifts attached. Then you get $ 50 of Google Voice International Calling Credit, two T-shirts, and a lifetime subscription to Google Shopping Express.

Ok, I'm kidding about all of that. (I know, I wish it was true). This is what actually happens:

(1) If you have not chosen a team yet, you can choose one. In general, you want to choose equipment that matches your career goals, and ideally is something that you are personally excited about. Your recruiter will usually set you up with multiple calls with different teams. One piece of advice recruiters probably won't want me to tell you: if you really, really don't like any of the teams you talked to… ask them to let you talk to another. It is important that you choose a team that you are satisfied with.

(2) After setting your start date, you will have to do some paperwork. I don't remember much about the paperwork when I joined Google because my brain was exploding with happy thoughts of "OMG I just got a job at Google, how did this even happen?" So frankly I'm pretty useless. by completing this detail. Talk to your friendly staff of staff.

(3) If you are joining as a software engineer like I did, an important step to think about is when you are asked what kind of computer and laptop you want. If (and only if) you're going to be writing iOS apps as your main job, get a Mac desktop. Otherwise, get a Linux desktop. Definitely don't do what I did and get a Windows desktop, because at Google we actually do development right on our workstations and you can't do it on Windows so it will feel silly (or at least I did). If you like having the experience of installing Ubuntu on your Google workstation in front of your coworkers during your first week of work, feel free to choose Windows. The laptop you choose is less important;

(4) You may feel like you should be reading and learning things to get ready for your first week on the job. Don't bother: Google's internal tech stack has a ton of new and unique things that you can't learn from the outside. Expect your first few months to be a blur of new information. Take some time before you start improving at Overwatch, enjoying your favorite hobby, or spending time with your family. You can actually keep doing it after you start too - the work-life balance at Google is usually pretty good.

(5) VERY IMPORTANT: At some point you are supposed to go to work at Google. Don't forget this part - you need to drive * to Google and start working there.

I hope this helps!

* Clarification: It's also okay to ride a bike, walk, ride a shuttle, or use one of those weird things on an elliptical bike that Sergey Brin was riding on "The Internship."

2 parts for your question,

Should I prefer Google to Facebook, and should I quit a job that just started 2 weeks ago?

In the first part, after 2 weeks on Facebook, you are probably in a good place to judge. The consensus seems to favor Facebook, with far more people abandoning Google for Facebook than the other way around. But, if after 2 weeks on Facebook, the onboarding process, and the huge amounts of kool aid you are exposed to, you're not very excited about working on Facebook, I can understand that you have doubts.

A warning about "a better deal". Salary is a relatively minor pair

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2 parts for your question,

Should I prefer Google to Facebook, and should I quit a job that just started 2 weeks ago?

In the first part, after 2 weeks on Facebook, you are probably in a good place to judge. The consensus seems to favor Facebook, with far more people abandoning Google for Facebook than the other way around. But, if after 2 weeks on Facebook, the onboarding process, and the huge amounts of kool aid you are exposed to, you're not very excited about working on Facebook, I can understand that you have doubts.

A warning about "a better deal". Salary is a relatively minor part of FB / Google compensation; there are other things to consider like equity, benefits, etc. Both companies are great on that front, but the benefits they offer differ slightly and can make your everyday life significantly different. The trip can also be different, etc. Finally, on the equity front, no one can predict whether FB's X shares will perform better than GOOG's Y shares in 4 years. That being said, you've probably been exposed to FB's plans for the future, so a judgment can be formed.

In the second part, should you quit a job that you started 2 weeks ago? Two parts to my answer.

For one thing, you can. In general, companies feel much less remorse when it comes to firing someone than they do when they leave a company that gave them a chance.

However, this is really not good for the provider who found you, for the recruiter who followed and supported you, for the people you met on your first day who are excited to be on that adventure with you, for the manager who awaits you in his team, in your future colleagues, etc. SV is a very small world and you don't want to be remembered as "that person". So if you decide to leave, you really need to take care of these personal relationships (and especially with recruiters).

You probably know the story of Sheryl Sandberg and Larry Summers, how she turned down their job offer, but offered an explanation as to why it was ingrained in her personal life. By doing so, she did not harm her relationship with him, and a year later, when her situation had changed, she reached out to him and asked if the job was still available (it was).

Bottom line: I don't think it's a great idea, but you may have personal reasons for doing it and you have every right to go where you think is best. But if you leave FB for Google, you really should care about personal relationships.

No but. Google, and almost certainly any company big enough that you can't just ask the guy doing all the interviews, will record the results of what happened.

If you apply for a completely different job, no problem, your previous performance is irrelevant and you can continue. If you apply for the same job for which you were rejected, the company can and will list you, either above or below applicants that the company is not aware of. So the stack goes

  • Interview people who did very well but did not accept an offer or withdrew before an offer could be made. (als
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No but. Google, and almost certainly any company big enough that you can't just ask the guy doing all the interviews, will record the results of what happened.

If you apply for a completely different job, no problem, your previous performance is irrelevant and you can continue. If you apply for the same job for which you were rejected, the company can and will list you, either above or below applicants that the company is not aware of. So the stack goes

  • Interview people who did very well but did not accept an offer or withdrew before an offer could be made. (also - people who worked for the company previously and left on good terms)
  • People who worked for the company in a related type of role (contractors, interns doing the same type of work) (I can't honestly say the priority between this and the first because we interviewed everyone in these first two vignettes)
  • Interview people who did well before but were not hired for any reason.
  • Interview people we don't know anything about.
  • * sigh * really? They were here? Do we still have open positions? Interview people who are known to have been worse than average.
  • People who did so badly have a special category, to make sure we don't have to spend time on them again. (Unless they are applying for a completely different scale of work, it is not personal, these are people who are not uniquely suited to the job position they first applied for and may have discovered the color of their parachute and want to float below a different post. colored flag.)
  • People who were previously laid off by the company. You just have to put this bullet on the list for it to be complete. There would have to be a zombie apocalypse before being interviewed again.

Yes, Google has a 1 week offer expiration, but it is not set in stone. See How much time do companies like Microsoft, Google, and Facebook give you to accept or decline a job offer?

In answer to your broader question, people generally fail to get multiple offers from more than 2-3 companies at the same time (unless they are going through an on-campus interview). First, it's quite difficult to line things up across multiple companies. Beyond that, it is not really beneficial for you to have more than 2 or 3 offers; it is a total discouragement for recruiters / employers to hear that a candidate

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Yes, Google has a 1 week offer expiration, but it is not set in stone. See How much time do companies like Microsoft, Google, and Facebook give you to accept or decline a job offer?

In answer to your broader question, people generally fail to get multiple offers from more than 2-3 companies at the same time (unless they are going through an on-campus interview). First, it's quite difficult to line things up across multiple companies. Beyond that, it is not actually beneficial for you to have more than 2 or 3 offers, it is a complete dismay for recruiters / employers to hear that a candidate is delaying to collect a handful of offers from other companies. It suggests a lack of real interest in your company, and who wants to hire someone who only wants to join your company because they have offered the most money?

However, to try to align offers from 2 or 3 companies at the same time:

  1. My first tip to you is ... it is probably less important to schedule interviews with different companies at the same time and more important to know and consider how long it takes different companies to reach a bid decision once you have interviewed them. Ask the respective recruiters from different companies about that (once you've gotten past the phone screening stage and line up the interview dates on the site accordingly).
  2. Once a company makes you an offer, immediately tell the recruiters of the other company so they can try to speed up your process and get you an offer in a timely manner.
  3. Be prepared to ask the first company (s) for an extension of your bid deadline, but recognize that it may put you at risk of a) having your bid withdrawn (although this rarely happens if it is just a short extension), or b) make your new team a little less excited about you, even if they finally accept your offer, due to loss of momentum and hesitation on your part (may not be significant in many / the most cases, but this can actually impact how your new team perceives you and potentially affect your early success at your new job.)
  4. However, you may eventually need to make decisions about the offers above before receiving offers from everyone you want to consider. Good luck with this, many candidates find this really uncomfortable.

Last, however, a philosophical comment. While having a competitive offer in hand can often help one receive a better offer, I think people spend too much time / energy obsessing over getting the best salary or negotiating the best offer (when instead they should choose in based on things like potential growth, opportunity to have a greater impact, fit with company culture, and the like that result in job satisfaction and higher fulfillment). When I think of the candidates I recruited at Google who ended up being star artists, virtually none of them seemed to have focused on negotiating the highest possible initial compensation: they were happy to receive something fair and seemed confident that their skills would earn them significant increases in merit and promotions over time. And they did.

Thanks for the A2A.

Disclaimers: I am not a recruiter, so take these policies with a grain of salt.

The short answer:
like anywhere else, they'll usually give you as much as you trade.

The long answer:
both Google and Facebook (my experience ...) believe in fairness, even the cost of losing a good candidate (you learn from this too!), So if a candidate says they are in the stages end with another company as well and apply for more time, the company will probably give the candidate the time they need. Also, since most engineering vacancies are not for a specific role / team, onc

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Thanks for the A2A.

Disclaimers: I am not a recruiter, so take these policies with a grain of salt.

The short answer:
like anywhere else, they'll usually give you as much as you trade.

The long answer:
both Google and Facebook (my experience ...) believe in fairness, even the cost of losing a good candidate (you learn from this too!), So if a candidate says they are in the stages end with another company as well and apply for more time, the company will probably give the candidate the time they need. Also, since most engineer vacancies are not for a specific role / team, once an offer is extended to you, there is a good chance that you can come back in the future and get an updated offer even if you turned down the previous one ( but not always and not everywhere, so don't count on that ..).

Numbers:
And as for the exact numbers, it varies according to:

  • Companies: Google, Facebook, Apple, etc.
  • Locations: San Francisco, New York, London, Tel Aviv, etc.
  • Roles: General SWE, Mobile Developer, Frontend Engineer, etc.
  • Experience: recently graduated, intern, 10 years of experience, etc.
  • And more...


Generally, it is fair to ask for a week or 10 days, especially if you have other offers (or near the end of other processes). But don't push too hard, respect those who invested time in your hiring process.

Good luck! :)

All three are amazing companies to work for. I can see why you would ask this question in the first place. All three companies have successful products, and most likely they won't go away anytime soon. Even with Facebook's data privacy issues, it would still be convenient if you had Facebook on your resume. The same goes for Amazon and Google. Amazon's AWS service is efficient and in demand; Google has a host of lucrative and in-demand products like Youtube, Google Cloud, etc.

But in regards to this question, I would accept Google's job offer. While the three tech companies

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All three are amazing companies to work for. I can see why you would ask this question in the first place. All three companies have successful products, and most likely they won't go away anytime soon. Even with Facebook's data privacy issues, it would still be convenient if you had Facebook on your resume. The same goes for Amazon and Google. Amazon's AWS service is efficient and in demand; Google has a host of lucrative and in-demand products like Youtube, Google Cloud, etc.

But in regards to this question, I would accept Google's job offer. While all three tech companies have had setbacks with public perception, I think Google has had the least and ultimately shown the most consistency in their company culture, the way it encourages and stimulates its employees, and how they continue to grow and scale.

Facebook, on the other hand, is still caught in the middle of a public relations storm regarding its data privacy practices. They will eventually recover, but it will come with time and a lot of effort on the part of the company to regain the public's trust.

Amazon has also had public relations struggles given its corporate culture. Like Apple, Amazon is working through its corporate culture and creating a functional and healthy organization. Some former employees would say that working at Amazon, specifically in regards to your work environment, was miserable. Although it's getting better and better, Amazon is working to make your work environment conducive to long-term satisfaction, comfort, and work-life balance.

For me, the bidding process (Google Dublin) was done in three steps:

  1. A few days after the interviews, I received an email from the recruiter saying that I was the preferred candidate for the position and that I would receive an offer conditional on approval by your manager and passing the "background check" (verifying that you did not lie on your resume and that the formal requirements are respected)
  2. A few days after that, I received another email from the same recruiter saying that he had received a response from his manager and that he would call me later that day to tell me the result (doing t
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For me, the bidding process (Google Dublin) was done in three steps:

  1. A few days after the interviews, I received an email from the recruiter saying that I was the preferred candidate for the position and that I would receive an offer conditional on approval by your manager and passing the "background check" (verifying that you did not lie on your resume and that the formal requirements are respected)
  2. A few days after that, I received another email from the same recruiter saying that he had received a response from his manager and that he would call me later that day to tell me the result (making the wait for the phone call quite stressful). Then he called me to announce the good news, along with some practical details like salary. He asked me if I was still okay to continue and that if so, I would receive a contract soon.
  3. A few hours later, I received a link to the digital contract that I had to sign electronically through DocuSign.net.

The contract was 14 pages long, starting with a nice logo:

The first section (6 pages) was the actual contract, with all the terms directly related to the internship (location, salary, start date, end date, etc.).

The second section was called "CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION, INVENTION ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENT AND NO APPLICATION" (5 pages) and is intended to transmit to Google the list of all inventions, patents, etc. potentials you would have prior to the start of the internship (or full-time position) to make it clear that you will not attempt a patent ambush against them later on, for example.

The next section (2 pages) was a welcome letter with a list of links to useful information for the start of the internship, such as how to find accommodation, what to wear, what to wear on the first day, etc.

The last page was the classic NDA (governed by the laws of the State of California, although the internship is in Europe). That is why I will not be able to give more details :)

I am a recruiter on Facebook and I can tell you that 90% of the time, everything David mentioned is correct. There are a few things to remember so you don't leave a "bad taste" in other companies' mouths.

  1. Don't use bidding as a method to simply get more money from the company you want to join. It's okay to go back and negotiate for more money if it makes sense, but if you're a jerk for being all about money, it probably will never work.
  2. Respect the recruiter at both companies. Often they are the ones who will stay in touch with you and re-engage you in the next 6 months or more. If you tell him at
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I am a recruiter on Facebook and I can tell you that 90% of the time, everything David mentioned is correct. There are a few things to remember so you don't leave a "bad taste" in other companies' mouths.

  1. Don't use bidding as a method to simply get more money from the company you want to join. It's okay to go back and negotiate for more money if it makes sense, but if you're a jerk for being all about money, it probably will never work.
  2. Respect the recruiter at both companies. Often they are the ones who will stay in touch with you and re-engage you in the next 6 months or more. If you tell the recruiter to stay in touch, they actually respond when they contact you. It is a two-way relationship.
  3. Keep attending the events you are invited to. It's okay to be a passive candidate. In fact, at any given time, most people are passive candidates. If you are invited to go to a happy hour or dinner, take it if you are free and it is still "the most important thing on my mind" for the other company.
  4. Don't badmouth the other company; especially with companies like Google and Facebook that almost always compete for similar talents. Each company is almost always aware of the other's culture and pros / cons. In general, it's never a good idea to badmouth another employer.
  5. Lastly, thank both the recruiter and the hiring manager of the company you are turning down. This goes a long way toward building relationships that can sometimes open doors at another time.

Send a resume? My personal experience is that it is useless.

I have never received any response for the 10 resumes from the big tech giants that I sent 3 years ago, except from Google (which was a No about 3 months later, and the funny thing is that another recruiter contacted me the following month).

That being said, a recruiter from most of those companies contacted me via Linkedin for the past 3 years (not my resumes), sometimes with different recruiters.


Submitting a resume is pretty pointless for a giant tech company. Think about how many resumes each of them receives on a daily basis. Unless yes

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Send a resume? My personal experience is that it is useless.

I have never received any response for the 10 resumes from the big tech giants that I sent 3 years ago, except from Google (which was a No about 3 months later, and the funny thing is that another recruiter contacted me the following month).

That being said, a recruiter from most of those companies contacted me via Linkedin for the past 3 years (not my resumes), sometimes with different recruiters.


Submitting a resume is pretty pointless for a giant tech company. Think about how many resumes each of them receives on a daily basis. Unless someone really stands out, you shouldn't expect any response.

There are more resumes for reviews than recruiting time to look at them. Even if every recruiter's job is to have the review resume all day, they probably still won't finish all the incoming resumes.

Internal referral is probably the best way to get notified, other than that a strong Linkedin profile with the right connections really helps.

Yes, you can definitely decline.

Signing any offer letter means that you have accepted the proposed offer. It does not mean that you have to join the organization. As in your case, if you are getting a better offer in terms of package and position, you should definitely give it a try. There is no point in thinking twice about whether you should look for a better opportunity or not.

You should always choose what is best for you. And one more tip, since you have a better offer, you can negotiate with Amazon and if they agree and give you a higher package, you can negotiate with a second body.

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Yes, you can definitely decline.

Signing any offer letter means that you have accepted the proposed offer. It does not mean that you have to join the organization. As in your case, if you are getting a better offer in terms of package and position, you should definitely give it a try. There is no point in thinking twice about whether you should look for a better opportunity or not.

You should always choose what is best for you. And one more tip, since you have a better offer, you can negotiate with Amazon and if they agree and give you a higher package, you can negotiate with a second organization as well ... It's your time to get what you deserve. ..

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