Doing a job has never been my dream. What are the motivating factors (eg your similar story) to help me quit a job and start my own business?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Jude Williams



Doing a job has never been my dream. What are the motivating factors (eg your similar story) to help me quit a job and start my own business?

This is a wonderful question. While it can be asked so simply, it can never be fully answered.

I will try to analyze your question and share some of my personal experiences and thoughts.

Doing a JOB has never been my dream.

The word "work" has strong connotations for me. I think many people use the word work to describe a paid position where you feel little to no control, see no future advancement, and get little to no fulfillment.

On the other hand, the word "Career" has equally strong connotations. Many races are filled with climbing, increased control, and responsibility.

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This is a wonderful question. While it can be asked so simply, it can never be fully answered.

I will try to analyze your question and share some of my personal experiences and thoughts.

Doing a JOB has never been my dream.

The word "work" has strong connotations for me. I think many people use the word work to describe a paid position where you feel little to no control, see no future advancement, and get little to no fulfillment.

On the other hand, the word "Career" has equally strong connotations. Many careers are filled with climbing, increased control and responsibility, and ultimately professional fulfillment.

An interesting alternative to consider is the term "entrepreneur". Unlike Job or Career, Entrepreneur has a romantic quality. Maybe it's because the word is French, and the French always sound romantic. Perhaps, it is all the exciting news we hear about wild successes and underdog victories.

But please don't be fooled. At some point in every entrepreneur's life, entrepreneurship will be a job, probably a career, and perhaps a victory story.

So with all of that said, let's get to the question ...

In line with what Adam Quiney meant. Find out what your dreams are and choose the path for you.

If your dream is for your children to be the first generation in your family to go to school, do whatever it takes to make that happen.

If your dream is to spend time with friends and family, do whatever it takes to make it happen.

If your dream is to be ultra rich, do what you have to do.

It will be difficult

It has no value until it costs you something

The above is adapted from the famous advice of Bill Bernbach, but it is valid for this topic.

If you have a dream of starting a business, go for it. If you dream of the fun, the challenges and the problem that you will solve, go for it. There is no doubt that it will be difficult and it will cost you. You will work long hours, you will make sacrifices that others would not consider and you will love it (in the end).

But remember, if you dream of not having a boss, being very rich, or working 4 hours a week to start your own business, this is probably not for you.

So what do I do next?

Sit down and have an honest conversation with yourself, with your partner, and with those who know you best. Discover your dream, and if it's about starting a business, no one will be able to dissuade you from quitting.

I quit what most would consider a 'stable' job in the Philippines, where I could no longer get job offers due to my high salary, unless I accepted pay cuts, and moved here in New York City (NYC). I gave up some status and the relative comforts of family, friends, and relatives. Here in New York City, for now I'm concentrating on building my online business storefronts, so I'll have substantial amounts of weekly residual income in due course. That will allow me to shift and focus more on my other full-time creative endeavors. So far so good. It has not been easy and I have learned a

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I quit what most would consider a 'stable' job in the Philippines, where I could no longer get job offers due to my high salary, unless I accepted pay cuts, and moved here in New York City (NYC). I gave up some status and the relative comforts of family, friends, and relatives. Here in New York City, for now I'm concentrating on building my online business storefronts, so I'll have substantial amounts of weekly residual income in due course. That will allow me to shift and focus more on my other full-time creative endeavors. So far so good. It has not been easy and I have learned many valuable lessons.

I don't know if what I've shared here will motivate you, and it doesn't matter in any way. Take the time to clarify how and why you are doing what you want to do. No amount of externally sourced motivation will help you do that. We all find out what exactly our individual life purposes are.

Having your own business is a goal. How far you can go in your own business is directly related to how good your idea is, what market you are delving into, and how much work you are willing to put into it. Establishing your business is like having a baby.

Now, notice that I didn't say "be your own boss" as a reason to open your business. The boss is the guy with your paycheck. When you are an employee, your boss is your employer; When you have your own business, your boss is your client.

I trust you have already identified the type of business you want to start. Once done, find a job in a similar type of business and learn the intricacies. After working 2-3 years, start your own business.

Keep in mind that any business needs time to grow and therefore must have the financial viability, patience, and support of family. Listen to all the suggestions, but let the decision be yours. Never compromise on quality of work and build a reputation that will last a lifetime.

Best wishes.

If you want an extreme example, I have a friend who quit his job and burned all the certificates he owns, including the college certificate.

Now he cannot get a job again because to apply for a job we need a university certificate.

Here in my country it is called "the power of kepepet" it means that you cannot apply anymore and use your skills to build your own business.

This trick makes you focus on building your own business, so if you failed in a business you don't think about finding a job (you can't) and you start thinking about starting another.

Note: don't do that if you are married. Take yours

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If you want an extreme example, I have a friend who quit his job and burned all the certificates he owns, including the college certificate.

Now he cannot get a job again because to apply for a job we need a university certificate.

Here in my country it is called "the power of kepepet" it means that you cannot apply anymore and use your skills to build your own business.

This trick makes you focus on building your own business, so if you failed in a business you don't think about finding a job (you can't) and you start thinking about starting another.

Note: don't do that if you are married. Take your own risk.

I am frequently asked "Do you think it is better to be self-employed or employed and why?"

Examine your own motivations to see what drives you. Unless you are driven to do business for yourself, don't go for it. It is a long and hard journey.

If you are dumb enough to want to be an entrepreneur? Be smart enough to get it right!

Sorry.

Starting a startup is looooong like a job, the only difference is that you are the one who pays.

If you CAN'T motivate yourself to work for someone else, I'm not sure you can hack it as an entrepreneur. Most entrepreneurs are self-motivated and goal-oriented.

Nabish,

Thanks for the reply request.

I am happy to honor your request and share my journey.

Would you start by sharing your own vision?

Start by not giving up on your business and getting real validation for your business before you do something drastic.

I quit my job new job even before I started my first day, so maybe I'm the least qualified person to say this (or maybe I'm the most qualified), but I understand that just wanting to start a business is very different than running a successful business. .

For starters, your business is statistically guaranteed to fail, especially if it's your first business (and if you're asking such a question on Quora, I'm sure it's your first). That means if you have already quit your job

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Start by not giving up on your business and getting real validation for your business before you do something drastic.

I quit my job new job even before I started my first day, so maybe I'm the least qualified person to say this (or maybe I'm the most qualified), but I understand that just wanting to start a business is very different than running a successful business. .

For starters, your business is statistically guaranteed to fail, especially if it's your first business (and if you're asking such a question on Quora, I'm sure it's your first). That means if you've already quit your job and don't have a source of income, your bankrupt business will just drive you crazy.

I quit my job to go into my own business because I had convinced myself that I wouldn't have enough time to focus on my business if I worked from 9 to 5. This was false, and any truth behind it was due to the fact that delegating sucked. If you want your business to be successful, you will need to be able to delegate effectively to ensure that your limited time is spent only on the most important value-added activities.

However, I was in a lucky situation, not only because my business was already making decent profits and growing quite fast, but also because it continued to do so after I left my 9-5. You may not be so lucky.

So, don't quit your job until you've validated your business idea with paying clients. Only once it gets you between 9 and 5 (or close enough) or if you have investors, should you even consider quitting. If you think you won't have enough time to spend on business with your 9–5, then hire someone to take some of the burden off you.

If you want to quit your job and start a business because you want to live the laptop lifestyle or you want others to work for you while sitting on the beach, then you are in for a huge reality check. The thing about owning a business is that even if you are not working, you will be thinking about working. Work-life balance is really non-existent, at least in the early stages (which can last for several years / decades, depending on how well you are at delegating). So if this is your goal, you'd better stick to your 9 to 5 hours, where work ends at 5 in the afternoon.

I started my career as an employee in one of the most respected companies in the world and had a dream career there. I worked at the same company for 17 years in three different locations, served multiple functional roles, and had all the fun one can expect from a corporate career. I was making a lot of money, a lot of love and respect. I still quit my job at the peak of my career to start a business.

Why?

These were some of the thoughts that I remember.

  1. You have only one life. Whatever you want to do, you must do it in that life itself. At 45, I felt like I didn't have much time left to
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I started my career as an employee in one of the most respected companies in the world and had a dream career there. I worked at the same company for 17 years in three different locations, served multiple functional roles, and had all the fun one can expect from a corporate career. I was making a lot of money, a lot of love and respect. I still quit my job at the peak of my career to start a business.

Why?

These were some of the thoughts that I remember.

  1. You have only one life. Whatever you want to do, you must do it in that life itself. At 45, I felt like I didn't have much time left to do different things if I continued with my corporate work.
  2. No matter how good a job you have, you still have to do what your teacher asks you to do. Your work is limited by the scope of your organization. I felt that if I had to do something really great, I had to go out and do it myself.
  3. I wanted to solve problems that impact people and society on a large scale. I thought Business was the right platform to do that. Business is the most defined and scalable platform
  4. I also wanted to work in areas of my deep interest which were People (not HR), Education and Career.

I should also add some of the commonly cited reasons that I did not consider when leaving my job and starting a business.

  1. To earn a lot of money for me. I was / am quite a happy person with everything I had / have ...
  2. To have more freedom at work. I was lucky to have freedom at work and I never thought of quitting for lack of freedom.
  3. Lack of job opportunities. It was not the case when I resigned and there was a very good demand from people like me.

Leaving a job and starting a business involves great risk and you need to understand this before you quit. I wouldn't say, I completely understood. Most of the people I know underestimate risks and get into trouble.

Every entrepreneur has their unique reason (s) and their personal context. Whatever the reasons, do your homework before starting your own business. Business is not a hobby and there is no one to protect you when you start to fall.

All the best,

Susanta@nicefit.in

No, it's definitely not true, well, if you don't have a lot to lose. Because you will lose everything.

When you become an entrepreneur, you choose the business path. It becomes incredibly difficult to relate to your friends, takes over your life, and damages your relationship with your spouse.

I'm not quite sure how to describe it, so here it goes: your life becomes business because the business world is so complex. You lose sleep over strategic decisions. Start learning about marketing, sales, accounting, production, IT, customer service, and, someday, human resources. Not to mention a

Keep reading

No, it's definitely not true, well, if you don't have a lot to lose. Because you will lose everything.

When you become an entrepreneur, you choose the business path. It becomes incredibly difficult to relate to your friends, takes over your life, and damages your relationship with your spouse.

I'm not quite sure how to describe it, so here it goes: your life becomes business because the business world is so complex. You lose sleep over strategic decisions. Start learning about marketing, sales, accounting, production, IT, customer service, and, someday, human resources. Not to mention all the business processes you have to set up, corporate taxes, payroll taxes, bookkeeping ... Then you get into business systems.

Note that we have not yet discussed your actual product or service.

Then you start to think twice about each of your decisions. And that's after launching his third company. The first or two, he ignores everything I just said and crashes horribly.

My recommendation is to start researching each of those departments and make sure you have a firm grasp of the resources you will need. Start with sales and marketing, because ultimately, sales and marketing will take up 70% of your life. There's a reason I specialize in that: Also, take everything you read with a grain of salt. Much of marketing is educated guesswork. Try to learn the underlying logic of marketing, advertising, public relations, and sales. Once you understand the underlying logic, the logic is fairly easy to transfer to other departments.

For any business topic, always think systematically. Determine what type of business you want to open: do you plan to work there all day or do you want to hire employees?

Lifestyle businesses, like corner stores and take-out restaurants, work very differently from those looking to build an organization.

If you determine that you want to go with an organization, then you need to create a system to:
1. Let people know who you are,
2. Appeal and convince people that they like and trust you,
3. Buy your product,
4 Over and over again,
5. and will recommend it to colleagues, friends and family.

So, you need a compliance process. Whether you are selling a service or goods, having the process in writing will allow you to hire someone to complete that process.

If you still want to become an entrepreneur (we both know you do. In fact, everything I just told you probably thrilled you as hell. If it didn't, get back to work)

FIRST, get a mentor. Find someone who has a lot more experience in business than you do to whom you can ask the tough questions to get an honest answer. We are not talking about a manager, you want the C-Suite type of person only. A business owner, CEO, CMO, CFO, or COO will do the trick.

Understand and determine what kind of decision making applies to each of your departments and put your head in the zone. Marketing and Sales spend money to generate profit; all other departments try to minimize costs.

To learn, first work in marketing. (Again, 70% of his life). Learn first to create a marketing strategy; this makes the tactics incredibly easy to choose. I wrote a blog on the topic:
Where do I start with marketing? Part 1: strategy versus tactics and determining a target market.

So start with a good marketing book. I highly recommend Duct Tape Marketing: http://www.ducttapemarketing.com/ Absolutely fantastic book.

Soak up all the free knowledge you can get. Remember, as an entrepreneur, no one is around to tell you that you are wrong and that includes almost everything you find online. If something sounds wrong, it probably is. You will be surprised how many small and medium-sized businesses continue to operate using poor quality business practices. However, it is a house of cards and you have to make sure that the house does not fall prematurely.

Also, consider an exit plan. Exit plans give you a set goal. It leads you to that goal. If you want to start a large company, it is best to start a small company and sell it, and work your way through the range of serial entrepreneurs.

Wow, that was a lot of writing. Phew.

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