Does speaking English in front of the mirror really improve speaking ability and confidence?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Isai Curtis



Does speaking English in front of the mirror really improve speaking ability and confidence?

If it does.


If you imagine yourself as someone else in front of the mirror and speak, you will improve your speaking skills and also develop an unexpected confidence that will help you in other activities as well.

Apart from that, you can also use other ways (1) Keep your voice audible

(2) Try to keep your body language

(3) Last but not least, practice some grammar too.

Of course, it improves and improves their spoken English skills, many have tried and tried this method or you can call it a technique that helps them overcome the problem of speaking English, the problem of stuttering, the average ordering of thoughts and the dialect can improve and overcome by practicing, I have personally tried it and I can tell you that it is one of the best remedies to gain confidence when speaking English and increase your confidence with English

I think that will help you a lot, but you can learn it even more effectively if you start talking to people in English for at least 2 hours a day.

This answer is not complete at all, but rather a supplement to what others said here:

1) It doesn't matter your level of English, just speak! This may sound stupid, but it is not. When learning a language (as well as other skills), perfectionism is sometimes an obstacle. Being fluent comes with practice, there is no other way, and FLUENCY IS MUCH MORE IMPORTANT THAN ACCURACY (this point is extremely important).

2) Avoid stuttering at all costs. There is nothing more annoying for a native speaker than hearing someone stutter or pause while trying to find the right word in their head. It's much better to do

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This answer is not complete at all, but rather a supplement to what others said here:

1) It doesn't matter your level of English, just speak! This may sound stupid, but it is not. When learning a language (as well as other skills), perfectionism is sometimes an obstacle. Being fluent comes with practice, there is no other way, and FLUENCY IS MUCH MORE IMPORTANT THAN ACCURACY (this point is extremely important).

2) Avoid stuttering at all costs. There is nothing more annoying for a native speaker than hearing someone stutter or pause while trying to find the right word in their head. It is much better to make mistakes (as long as the message is delivered) than to be correct but annoying.

Think of Tarzan in the movies. Talk like, well, like Tarzan. But we all get it! Making it clear is your most important goal. It doesn't matter if you do it like Tarzan. Seek perfection later.

Imagine you are a bartender and someone tells you "I need beer." It's awful English, but effective. This boy has already achieved his first goal.

Each language has a subset of approximately 300 words that are needed to communicate effectively with others. Anyone can learn them in no time.

Perfection comes with lots of reading, listening, and practice. I'm afraid you need time for this. There is no fast track. You can have a very good level of English, academically correct and even elegant just by reading and listening a lot.
But complete perfection comes with total immersion. That means living with people who only speak English for a considerable period of time.

My experience:

As you may have noticed, my English is far from perfect, but I never had a problem while traveling and working the world.
I had a couple of years of formal education (about three hours a week) while I was in elementary school, but I wasn't very interested in studying. It was at the age of 15 that I became a fan of martial arts and started reading "Black Belt" and the American magazine.

In Buenos Aires, in 1985, those magazines were not easy to find, so
I read each issue at least a thousand times. Reading an unfamiliar word over and over makes you try to find its meaning. This is how I learned almost everything I know, on my own.

Ten years later, I traveled for the first time to an English-speaking country. I visited Boston for a month with the excuse of doing an intensive English course.
I was nervous because I thought my English sucked, but shortly after my arrival, I was chatting with a taxi driver. It was Ike "hey! I can do it!"

To make a long story short: I got bored in class and was so excited to be in Boston, a new city, a new culture, that I spent the entire month hanging out, having fun, and meeting people. It was the best thing that could have happened to my English. My confidence skyrocketed.

I learned a few things from this experience ...
I used to pause as I spoke, trying to figure out the right word to be precise, and people seemed to get impatient with me. It happened a few times until someone directly told me that it was annoying.
Then I learned that being concise is extremely important.
Each sentence has a subject and a verb. If you're having trouble, just think about your subject and your verb. Forget about conjugation or tense verbs, just do it TARZAN MODE (I'll get the trademark for this soon :-), and you'll be fine. Next time you will do better.

If you are lost in a city and you are about to miss your flight, you need to get there fast and you don't know how to do it, what do you do?
Just find someone and say "taxi, airport".

I traveled to China 3 times for work and had a paper with some critical words written, of course just their pronunciation.
Believe me, I was moving like a fish in water ...

PS: By the way, if you like TV comedies, I highly recommend watching "Seinfeld" in English (and with English subtitles if possible).
Why? Simply because these characters speak in an unusual way for television. They all speak very clearly and with excellent pronunciation.
Also, this program is a great way to get used to the common idioms of everyday conversation.

I think this is probably the way most sitcoms do it on TV. I wonder why it sounds so different from movies or other shows ...

Hey!

Good question!

Let's first look at how to improve your English speaking ability.

To speak English fluently, you must first understand the language. That is why I recommend that you watch Hollywood movies or TV series, without subtitles. It can be difficult at first. What you can do is keep the subtitles ON in the first 2-3 episodes of the series (like Flash, Arrow, etc.). This way, you will be able to understand the accent with which people are speaking. Then after you get that remove the subtitles and then watch.

Now, start speaking in English with people close to you. If you feel sh

Keep reading

Hey!

Good question!

Let's first look at how to improve your English speaking ability.

To speak English fluently, you must first understand the language. That is why I recommend that you watch Hollywood movies or TV series, without subtitles. It can be difficult at first. What you can do is keep the subtitles ON in the first 2-3 episodes of the series (like Flash, Arrow, etc.). This way, you will be able to understand the accent with which people are speaking. Then after you get that remove the subtitles and then watch.

Now, start speaking in English with people close to you. If you are feeling shy, start speaking in English with family members first. At first, it will be difficult, but if you keep practicing, you will learn to speak fluently.

Second, let's see how to improve the pronunciation of English words.

To improve your pronunciation, you must first practice your vocabulary. For that, there are many online resources available. The resource I use to improve my vocabulary is Magoosh Test Prep. After you get a good vocabulary, try to use it in your daily English conversation. Initially, you will make mistakes, but constantly listening to English in Hollywood movies or TV series will gradually improve it.

Last but not least, to boost confidence

I suggest you keep practicing talking to people. Many people get nervous when speaking English to other people because of eye contact. For that I also have a technique. While talking to someone, instead of looking into their eyes, you can look at the region between the eyes. With this, the other person will think that you are looking into their eyes, but in reality it is not the case!

So in this way, you can use these techniques to increase your confidence while speaking in English.

Therefore, I would ask you to keep practicing and to be consistent with your practice.

Good luck!

Thank you for reading!

For any questions / corrections, do not hesitate to leave a comment.

Greetings,

Shantanu

I think there are two problems involved here:

1) Your English is not yet "automatic" enough. You say you always translate from Hindi, but I'd risk guessing that there are phrases you use automatically that you don't need to translate. For example, I doubt that you have to translate from Hindi when you say "I don't know" or "What time is it?" The problem is that this range of expressions is still too limited.

2) Your English is heavily influenced by Hindi phraseology, grammar, and vocabulary. Even your question is a bit strange for a non-Indian native speaker, who would say

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I think there are two problems involved here:

1) Your English is not yet "automatic" enough. You say you always translate from Hindi, but I'd risk guessing that there are phrases you use automatically that you don't need to translate. For example, I doubt that you have to translate from Hindi when you say "I don't know" or "What time is it?" The problem is that this range of expressions is still too limited.

2) Your English is heavily influenced by Hindi phraseology, grammar, and vocabulary. Even your question is a bit strange for a non-Indian native speaker, who would say "When I speak English, I always translate from Hindi". This is the result of several things: you usually translate from Hindi instead of writing in English, you have acquired certain habits of using this dependency on translation, and you are influenced by the people around you.

I am not sure what is the best practical method to solve this problem because I do not know the situation in India, but I think the solution is the same for both aspects.

As others have said, you need to use more English, either for listening and reading, or for speaking and writing. When you first learned English, you probably even translated "I don't know" from Hindi. But (if my guess is correct) it has become automatic for you to say it in English. So you simply need to expand your repertoire of spontaneous English expressions from "I don't know" to more and more phrases and expressions. This will be a slow process, but as you become fluent you will be able to produce more and more English sentence patterns automatically. For example, I'm sure you can use "When I ..." in English without thinking too much. From there, it's not too difficult to start using phrases like "When I get up in the morning, I brush my teeth."

This is the foundation of the pattern practice language approach, which expects the student to practice speaking using established sentence patterns.

A hypothetical exercise to practice patterns with "When I ..." would be:

Hint: "get up in the morning" ... "brush my teeth"

Answer: "When I get up in the morning I brush my teeth"


The exercises tend to be tedious (even boring), but if you persevere, your use of English will definitely become more automatic. I suggest that you try to find these kinds of teaching materials (if they are available in India) and use them for a while.

Another method is to repeat sentences from language learning materials. However, this is not as useful as pattern practice, as it does not develop the flexibility or the ability to apply the same pattern to different sentences.

The other important way to get away from translation is what other people have suggested: get more exposure to English. Interact with people in English, watch movies in English, read books and articles in English. Only by being constantly exposed to English will you change from something that is translated from Hindi to something that is part of you.

For books and movies, I would suggest that it is preferable to use non-Indian models (foreign books and movies) because the English used in India has its own usual expressions and quirks, often influenced by Hindi or other local languages, which are not typical of other varieties of English.

It doesn't hurt to use mirror speaking practice as one of your methods, but since spoken language is generally meant to be conversational, you'll need to have a conversation with yourself in front of the mirror (and you know how that is, there are a reason people tend to look at us curiously if we talk to ourselves), or you will need to find someone real to chat with, ideally someone who speaks English well and can model it for you and give you suggestions on how to improve. If that person wants to learn your language, so much the better; they can teach each other

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It doesn't hurt to use mirror speaking practice as one of your methods, but since spoken language is generally meant to be conversational, you'll need to have a conversation with yourself in front of the mirror (and you know how that is, there are a reason people tend to look at us curiously if we talk to ourselves), or you will need to find someone real to chat with, ideally someone who speaks English well and can model it for you and give you suggestions on how to improve. If that person wants to learn your language, so much the better; They can teach each other for free and, at the same time, develop a close friendship.

If no one is available locally, or you are embarrassed to speak your new language face to face, try talking to someone on the phone or on Skype or Messenger or a similar tool (just turn off the video option).

If the problem is getting the "correct accent", there are language learning software programs in which you can listen to a word, phrase or sentence and then repeat it. The program will tell you how accurate your pronunciation is and you can keep working on it until it says "you got it!"

However, when using language learning software or taking language lessons from someone else, you may want to decide which "general accent" you prefer (British, American, Australian, etc.) and choose a software that uses it. When I was learning French at school in the past, every year I had a teacher from a different Francophone background. My first teacher spoke it with an English-Canadian accent, my next teacher spoke it with a Quebec accent, then I had a teacher with a mixed British / Parisian accent, a teacher with a purely Parisian accent, and finally a teacher with an Akkadian French accent. Needless to say, I ended up with a unique accent that hardly anyone could understand clearly and that contained a strange mix of regional terms, so I never really mastered French, although I was lucky enough to be able to understand basically a wide variety of terms. of accents. Later, just for fun, I added a little Creole to the mix!

Another way to improve your spoken English is to watch a variety of different types of TV shows and movies and repeat what you hear. You will get a lot of practice speaking this way, and it will include many different topics and situations, so it will really expand your vocabulary. Again, pick an accent that you want to use in real life situations.

And ideally, if possible, spend some time in a truly "immersive" situation where you have to use English in all of your daily activities over a period of time.

There are many who claim to be the best in Indore. Personally, I don't prefer any English-speaking class and I don't believe their supposed claims.

You can follow these points to improve your English over the period of time.

  1. Read good novels: reading is the key here, if you want to speak English well, first learn to read. Start with some interesting novels by Chetan Bhagat (5 point out one or three mistakes in my life) and then gradually switch to novels written by some foreign writers.
  2. Improve your vocabulary: whenever you come across an unfamiliar word, mark the same and t
Keep reading

There are many who claim to be the best in Indore. Personally, I don't prefer any English-speaking class and I don't believe their supposed claims.

You can follow these points to improve your English over the period of time.

  1. Read good novels: reading is the key here, if you want to speak English well, first learn to read. Start with some interesting novels by Chetan Bhagat (5 point out one or three mistakes in my life) and then gradually switch to novels written by some foreign writers.
  2. Improve your vocabulary: whenever you come across an unfamiliar word, mark it and try to understand its meaning in context. Use the dictionary and then try to use that word in your writing.
  3. Practice in front of the mirror: if you want to improve your way of speaking in public, the mirror is your best friend. Try to explain your thoughts to yourself first, and then once you are convinced, convey the same thing in front of a group of people.
  4. Reading and writing on Quora - Use this beautiful platform for reading and writing. Nobody is going to judge you here. If you're still scared, write your responses anonymously initially and use your credentials once you're safe enough.
  5. Do not be ashamed of your failures: Your failures are the key to success, do not be afraid or ashamed if you face any setback at first, remember that this is not your main idea and it takes a lot of effort to learn a different language.

All the best.

It's good to practice in front of a mirror, but it's even better to practice in front of a camera.

There are also some tools that help people improve their English speaking skills. For example, there is a mobile application called GuGu Bear. Analyze your way of speaking and give you comments / recommendations on areas to improve. Download it from the app store or Google Play store and give it a try.

For the topic discussed, why not start with the ones you are most familiar with? :)

It depends solely on the person's ability to learn and apply. Since you said improve and not learn, I am forced to assume that you already know and encounter problems with big words, fluency, grammar, etc. On this criterion, if you work hard enough, you'll master it in just a month and get started. Using big words in about a year or two on a small scale, time strengthens all skills, so you'll need it, but that's to be best, improvements start to show in only a few months. (Read as much as you can, write as much as you can, and talk / listen as much as you can.)

Learn not as a "professional" but as an amateur, that is, as a lover of the language. All kinds of methods will be proposed to you: two-language chat exchanges, reading what interests you, English-speaking authors whose work interests you, watching / listening to talk shows, watching English videos, watching all English-speaking movies on OV (with subtitles, if necessary), learn grammar little by little, but seek answers from knowledgeable English speakers when you experience difficulty. Immerse yourself in it. The only way. I speak from experience. Good luck!

when you speak in front of your mirror you are not talking to yourself. You are making a speech that is similar to speaking in front of a person. Even if there is no one to correct you, it is fine because improving your speaking skills takes practice, the more you practice, the better you will speak. You will begin to learn about your mistakes over time if you don't kick the habit of talking. Do it anyway.

You can also try different tactics to make talking in front of your mirror more interesting. Look at this video

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