Does Apple hire from India?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Sarah Brock



Does Apple hire from India?

Short answer: YES!

Detailed answer: Apple only has one campus in India (Hyderabad) as of now. They are focused on hiring talented people and expanding their India campus.

So now is a good time to apply and wait for a call in case your resume meets the job requirements. They are hiring very actively by communicating with people on platforms like LinkedIn as well. (I myself received a personal message from a Google recruiter via LinkedIn.) So, just improve your skills and be active on such platforms and you will definitely be able to land in the place of your dreams.

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Short answer: YES!

Detailed answer: Apple only has one campus in India (Hyderabad) as of now. They are focused on hiring talented people and expanding their India campus.

So now is a good time to apply and wait for a call in case your resume meets the job requirements. They are hiring very actively by communicating with people on platforms like LinkedIn as well. (I myself received a personal message from a Google recruiter via LinkedIn.) So, just improve your skills and be active on such platforms and you will definitely be able to land in the place of your dreams.

Feel free to comment on Amazon and Intuit references. All the best!

Apple started hiring from Indian institutes from 2017 ... The first year in 2017 they hired only IIIT Hyderabad ... Now they hire from multiple campuses like BITS Pilani, IIITB, IIITH, Old IIT (also IITH from new IITs), NSUT, etc. For the past 2 years, he has also hired VIT Vellore.

It seems that Apple is strengthening the design center in India, which is really a great thing.

Apple in India does not hire for your company. Although there are some research and technology companies that work for Apple that do hire people.
For ex. - NGRT

Working for Apple has been idealized by the media, the movies, etc. People I met in the San Jose / San Francisco area had stars in their eyes when they found out I was working for All-Mighty Apple.

They sure have great employee benefits. The best. They have good food for the employees. They even pay for dinner for certain engineering teams, if they stay after 7. Each reward has a price. Staying up late pays off, even when you could easily finish your work and collaborations and go home. The balance between work and life is something that worries them, but it is not. In fact, they pretend to care about many of the

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Working for Apple has been idealized by the media, the movies, etc. People I met in the San Jose / San Francisco area had stars in their eyes when they found out I was working for All-Mighty Apple.

They sure have great employee benefits. The best. They have good food for the employees. They even pay for dinner for certain engineering teams, if they stay after 7. Each reward has a price. Staying up late pays off, even when you could easily finish your work and collaborations and go home. The balance between work and life is something that worries them, but it is not. In fact, they pretend to care about many things that they don't care about.

The talent search, interview process, and hiring process make you feel like you're about to work with a lot of brilliant people on things that are important to you. The fact is, you will be on a team that may or may not want to collaborate.

Each person is the "smartest person in the room." Everybody is a leader. It has its jerks who will turn to top management with every issue, and who will be rewarded for doing so.

I was the only Ph.D. in my team. My manager asked that no one call me "Dr." because that's not the "apple way". In fact, this happened because a team member complained that the team didn't know who was "in charge" because I was a PhD. Apparently, he was threatened. Interestingly, I discovered that there are many other teams within special projects that have PhDs and have no problems. I wasn't asking my team to refer to me as "dr." My "teammate" had a problem with being introduced as "dr" during meetings. He was supposed to be in charge apparently.

I made the mistake of questioning the data that had been collected. Part of my job was to analyze data and data collection methods. The data was not standardized, which is very simple. That one question put me on the bad side of my manager. He moved me to another team and had me work on projects that I really didn't want to work on. I sucked it, they put me in my place.

There are a lot of brilliant people at Apple, but there are also a lot of selfish traitors who want to see you fail, as with many corporate cultures.

Management wants to rest on their past laurels and tell you all that they have accomplished. They are considered as "gods" of the apple. One that I worked with actually told me that it would threaten the license of contract workers (nurses) that we use in data collection, among many other insensitive things.

What made me re-evaluate my life and my work schedule was that I was in a car accident on the way to work one morning after spending time at Apple. They were putting me in an ambulance and all I could say / think was that I needed my phone to call work. The EMS team and the police assured me that they would receive my phone and call. Still, as soon as they gave me my phone, I called, emailed, etc. from the hospital. It took more than two days before someone checked on me. Even then, it was probably just because I called again to say that I guess they didn't care that I was in the hospital.

That really put things in perspective for me. It shows how important it really is and how expendable and replaceable it is, even in Apple Corporate.

This is a pretty broad question, and it's unclear what your specific area of ​​interest is here, but I'll try.

The first thing to keep in mind is that Apple has two "sides": retail and corporate. I don't know anything about the retail side of things, but I would expect, early in the process, that it's probably a bit like any other retail job, that is, 'a person walks into the store and asks to fill out a job application. '

My experience is with the corporate side. It's worth mentioning up front that different groups within Apple are likely to handle the hiring.

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This is a pretty broad question, and it's unclear what your specific area of ​​interest is here, but I'll try.

The first thing to keep in mind is that Apple has two "sides": retail and corporate. I don't know anything about the retail side of things, but I would expect, early in the process, that it's probably a bit like any other retail job, that is, 'a person walks into the store and asks to fill out a job application. '

My experience is with the corporate side. It's worth mentioning up front that different groups within Apple probably handle hiring differently, but in terms of my personal experience, the hiring process works a bit like this:

  • The candidate finds a vacant position at http://jobs.apple.com and submits their resume via the website for consideration for that specific position OR the candidate expresses interest in (and gives a resume to) a friend or acquaintance who is a current Apple employee.
  • If there is interest in the resume, someone (probably a human resources representative or the hiring manager) will contact the candidate by phone and conduct a preliminary phone screen to see if there is more interest in the candidate.
  • If there is more interest, the candidate will be invited to interview several current members of the hiring manager's team in person over the course of a day.
  • Current team members will meet with the hiring manager to report their impressions.
  • The hiring manager will make a decision and inform HR. If there is not a good fit, HR will inform the candidate of it. If there is a good fit, the hiring manager will work with HR to prepare an offer.


For what it's worth, this has been the same basic hiring process for almost every company I've worked with or interviewed; I don't find Apple's corporate hiring / recruiting process to be substantially different from any other big tech company I've seen.

He specifically used the word "recruitment." I can't speak to anything beyond my personal experience (as an engineer), but I haven't seen much active "recruiting", if at all. My personal experience is that the main challenge is choosing the best candidates from a wide variety of resumes.

He specifically asked how to contact the human resources department. Apple is "in the book" so to speak, you can call the main switchboard and ask to speak to someone in Human Resources, but I suspect that anyone who calls will be immediately redirected to the website.

Bottom line: If you know someone who works for Apple, I recommend asking them about any opportunities they know of and maybe giving them your resume. If you don't have pre-existing contacts within the company, I suggest you submit a resume via http://jobs.apple.com

I worked at Apple for 2 years and change. I have been working at Google for a few years. This is a reflection of Apple in 2006 or so. These are my personal opinions, and they are just that: opinions.

Google and Apple are very different. Apple has a design DNA. Google has a technological DNA. You will feel this everywhere. Google is functional, it is about solving a difficult problem. Apple is about designing something that looks good, it's about selling it and making money.

Apple has a different feel. It's the "I'm cool" feeling. It's the look, we made this thing look cooler and prettier and now there's also ma

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I worked at Apple for 2 years and change. I have been working at Google for a few years. This is a reflection of Apple in 2006 or so. These are my personal opinions, and they are just that: opinions.

Google and Apple are very different. Apple has a design DNA. Google has a technological DNA. You will feel this everywhere. Google is functional, it is about solving a difficult problem. Apple is about designing something that looks good, it's about selling it and making money.

Apple has a different feel. It's the "I'm cool" feeling. It's the looks, we made this look cooler and prettier and now there are too many people vying for discounted things for their employees. Fundamentally, Apple was founded and run by a salesperson (Steve Wozniak was sidelined). And very good at it. Google was started and run by three types of Doctor of Philosophy degrees. It gives you a "knowledge is cool" feeling. The campus feels like a university.

My manager at Apple told me that it is a hardware company and that software is not the top priority. This affects Apple, and software engineering is undoubtedly a second-class citizen.

Working at Apple is like working in armies (not specific). Sure you may ask why you should jump into the river, but you better be soaked before asking that question. This may be an exaggeration, but again, it is my opinion. It's hard to be a troublemaker and controversial character at Apple.

Furthermore, as an individual collaborator, your access to information and people internally will be restricted. The company will look like a set of watertight compartments, which will magically stay afloat. Of course it isn't, but as an individual contributor, you won't see anything other than the things you should (for the most part) see.

When I joined Apple, I lowered the average age of my 6-person engineering group by about 3 years. And it is that the people of Apple will not appreciate how I formulated the last observation; like a puzzle.

If you are smart, ambitious and an engineer, never look up to the 95014. Never.

Like I said, these are my opinions. I am not making any legal claims.

I did an internship and I have a father who works there and has worked there.

Not everyone is super genius in my opinion, but I feel like people are productive and will have no trouble meeting deadlines and goals.

They are not necessarily the most socially competent or awkward at all, but what the company values ​​the most is work ethic, dedication and commitment.

So it does not seem impossible to get a job there, nor to require a higher school. You would never believe that something is difficult and you would not try to do it just because it makes it more difficult.

I might believe that it is so difficult to be an actor and never do

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I did an internship and I have a father who works there and has worked there.

Not everyone is super genius in my opinion, but I feel like people are productive and will have no trouble meeting deadlines and goals.

They are not necessarily the most socially competent or awkward at all, but what the company values ​​the most is work ethic, dedication and commitment.

So it does not seem impossible to get a job there, nor to require a higher school. You would never believe that something is difficult and you would not try to do it just because it makes it more difficult.

You might believe that it is so difficult to be an actor and never make it in Hollywood.

But yeah, I'd say it's competitive to the point, maybe like UCLA (at best) but not impossible like Harvard.

I also recommend doing an internship there and it will help you a lot with your work. If not, years of experience elsewhere would likely land you a job.

Honestly, I don't think it's extremely difficult, it just takes solid qualifications and work ethic. Plus it's really in the mindset. My father worked there so I assumed it was easy to get in and got the job. Similarly, many people who have famous actor parents immediately enter show business and succeed. It's about how difficult you perceive something. I think if you feel like you've done good things and are qualified, I can't say I've seen more than any employee, but I'm not going to say there aren't smart, talented, and talented people. Not at all, so if someone doesn't make the cut, they do recruit top talent in the areas they're in. In short, I would only recommend not to worry if it is difficult, but to qualify for the planned job and do it.

Google India takes many things into account when hiring a candidate to work for the company as a software engineer. For starters, there are some minimum qualifications that they expect from a candidate and some preferred qualifications that help the candidate to be hired more easily if they have them. These are:

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Electrical or Computer Engineering, or equivalent practical experience
  • 5 years of relevant work experience
  • Programming experience in one or more of the following languages: C, C ++, Java, and
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Google India takes many things into account when hiring a candidate to work for the company as a software engineer. For starters, there are some minimum qualifications that they expect from a candidate and some preferred qualifications that help the candidate to be hired more easily if they have them. These are:

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Electrical or Computer Engineering, or equivalent practical experience
  • 5 years of relevant work experience
  • Programming experience in one or more of the following languages: C, C ++, Java and / or Python

# 2 PREFERRED RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Computer science background, with competencies in data structures, algorithms, or API design
  • Experience automation and scaling of mobile or web backends
  • Experience with the development of full-stack or back-end applications
  • Knowledge of mobile application development on Android and detection technologies.
  • Ability to learn other coding languages ​​as needed

Once they have determined that the candidate has these minimum qualifications (and hopefully some of the preferred qualifications), the interview process comes into play. This process is divided into two parts:

  1. Telephone Interview: This part of the interview will be behavioral, and Google India's main focus in this interview will be to determine whether or not you are a good fit for the company culture. However, you will also have to answer some technical questions by using a shared document, and these questions can have any kind of difficulty, from Easy to Hard. If you successfully answer the behavioral and technical questions, you will proceed to the on-site interview.
  2. Face-to-face interview: This part of the interview process will be divided into 4 to 6 interviews, and all aspects that were evaluated in the telephone interview will be discussed here. Each interviewer will evaluate their performance based on four categories (analytical skills, coding, experience and communication), and each category will be evaluated with a score of 1.0 to 4.0. Interviewers' comments are kept confidential from each other, and after the entire interview process is complete, these comments will be sent to a hiring committee for a decision.

To ensure you have the best chance of landing the job, you'll want to study three topics that are crucial to answering all the interview questions you face: These topics are data structures and algorithms, systems design, and soft skills.

# 3 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This is the topic that most candidates focus on the most, and this is because mastering this topic is vital if you want to answer any coding questions you see, whether it's via computer or whiteboard. Important concepts to know about on this topic are hash tables, sort algorithms, search algorithms, binary search trees, bit manipulation, and dynamic programming, just to name a few.

There are many resources you can use on this topic, but ideally you want to use one that teaches you the theory of this topic first so that you can then address the practical applications of what you have learned. For example, you might want to enroll in a course like Tech Interview Pro, an interview prep course designed by a former Google SWE that has two detailed modules on DS&A, and then you could use an online judge platform like HackerEarth to practice solving coding questions.

# 4 SYSTEM DESIGN

This topic is important to Google because it is a web-based company, so it is a good idea to learn scalability theory and systems design so that you can answer any design-related questions that come your way. Important concepts to know about here would be load balancing, CDNs, database fragmentation, redundancy and replication, and API design.

Like DS&A, you want to tackle the theory of this topic first and then the practice. To do this, you can read a book like SQL Queries for Mortals, a book that demystifies all aspects of SQL queries, and then you could look up design-related questions to solve on a site like CareerCup.

# 5 SOFT SKILLS

This topic refers to non-technical skills such as communication, leadership, and teamwork skills. Other candidates often underestimate the importance of this topic, and knowing how to express the solutions that occur to your interviewer and demonstrate that you have an aptitude for teamwork will make you stand out from the rest of the candidates. To practice these soft skills, you can use a site like Pramp, which allows you to participate in mock interviews with other software engineers (some of whom have worked at large tech companies like Google and Amazon before) while receiving immediate and objective feedback. in their performance.

Good luck with your interviews.

Yes friend.

But the road will not be easy, do not screw yourself.


Assuming you have:

  • Higher ratings
  • Of the best schools
  • With superior work experience
  • With the best connections

You can probably arrange an interview :)

Expect. I speak of a utopia.

That does not exist.

So what the hell are you really doing then?

  • Be a lion dressed as a lamb while living among wolves

The adage is true: "you can do whatever you want." It will be unimaginably difficult.

So don't imagine the difficulty. Just take a MASSIVE action.

  1. Open a Google Sheets / Excel spreadsheet
  2. Document all 'Indians who work at Apple' and variations of this
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Yes friend.

But the road will not be easy, do not screw yourself.


Assuming you have:

  • Higher ratings
  • Of the best schools
  • With superior work experience
  • With the best connections

You can probably arrange an interview :)

Expect. I speak of a utopia.

That does not exist.

So what the hell are you really doing then?

  • Be a lion dressed as a lamb while living among wolves

The adage is true: "you can do whatever you want." It will be unimaginably difficult.

So don't imagine the difficulty. Just take a MASSIVE action.

  1. Open a Google Sheets / Excel spreadsheet
  2. Document all 'Indians working at Apple' and variations of this, for example 'From India to Apple CEO' or whatever you see fit
  3. Read all the links mentioned
  4. Draw out your shortcomings compared to what these folks did at your point in YOUR journey.
  5. Get in touch with a "load" of tech recruiters. Combine your tips in a second tab in the spreadsheet
  6. Highlight the core things that come out of those conversations.
  7. Read about the history of Apple
  8. Start covering up any weaknesses you have
  9. Then the hardest part. The X factor '
    1. Find a way to stand out. This could be:
      1. Develop an application
      2. Develop a remarkable blog
      3. Develop some kind of 'follow-up'
      4. Develop some kind of technology (software / hardware)
      5. Do something special ...
  10. (Optional) Fly to Apple Inc headquarters for a week
  11. (Optional) Apply to Apple in person. Annoy until you get '5 minutes' with someone important
  12. (O) Apply online

==========================

And remember:

So whatever you do. Do something.

This answer is for Indians in particular.

My first cousin works at Apple as a software engineer. They do not hire B.Tech students for software engineering positions directly from India. If you want to work there, you must do a master's degree at a foreign university, preferably in the United States, and then apply to Apple.

However, you may be considered for an internship even if you don't have MS. If you know someone who is working there, ask them to send their resume to the recruiter. You can also apply on your intern's website, but there is very little chance that they will respond.

Apple opens an R&D

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This answer is for Indians in particular.

My first cousin works at Apple as a software engineer. They do not hire B.Tech students for software engineering positions directly from India. If you want to work there, you must do a master's degree at a foreign university, preferably in the United States, and then apply to Apple.

However, you may be considered for an internship even if you don't have MS. If you know someone who is working there, ask them to send their resume to the recruiter. You can also apply on your intern's website, but there is very little chance that they will respond.

Apple will open an R&D office in Hyderabad in 2017. I'm sure they will hire Indian students then. So be prepared until then. Work on a good project and get some experience.

Good luck!

Apple has almost 35% of the employees as Indians. Any company, more specifically any technology company, cannot afford not to hire Indians and continue to run their businesses. Indians make up 15% of the world's population and when it comes to technology, Indians make up almost 40% of the world's population due to their educational system, large talent pool, cost leverage, business time zones, etc.

Health!!

If you are talking about recruiting in India then it is NO, but if you are only concerned with nationality (no matter where they completed their education from) then it is obvious that they are. To back up this latest statement, one of the cousins ​​got his B.Tech. From the university of intellectual property and his master's degree from Brown University and then he was selected at Apple.

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