Do you regret working in IT? Why or why not?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Tommy Roberts



Do you regret working in IT? Why or why not?

I do not regret working in the information technology industry as I have gained a lot of experience while starting fresh and after. With around 8 to 9 years of experience in Mainframe technology and BFSI domain, if you have good analytical skills and good IT knowledge, then you have many options to work and learn.

And these days, IT is a steady source of income compared to other fields with fixed benefits like licenses, health insurance, pf savings, or many other benefits if you are abroad and work for IT MNC here.

I am happily satisfied with my work and I do not see any regrets even though there are many drawbacks associated with it, such as delayed promotion, less learning towards other technologies / fields, the biased nature of people, but it is not the same in everywhere and you can still reap something. benefits if you work smart and learn to grow up the ladder of success.

Apologies for the anon, I don't want to be judged.

Ok, first, yes, many engineers quit every 2 years, and yes, as stated before, many of them do so because they are experts who stand out from others and seek more exciting jobs. Some of them are experts like no other and find good jobs in well-paying companies (Google, Amazon, etc.)

But there are also engineers who, although they are good, do not really stand out much. Still, they are great and will gain more experience over time with hard work and study. And there is work in many places. The most common in the case of the c

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Apologies for the anon, I don't want to be judged.

Ok, first, yes, many engineers quit every 2 years, and yes, as stated before, many of them do so because they are experts who stand out from others and seek more exciting jobs. Some of them are experts like no other and find good jobs in well-paying companies (Google, Amazon, etc.)

But there are also engineers who, although they are good, do not really stand out much. Still, they are great and will gain more experience over time with hard work and study. And there is work in many places. The most common in the case of the city in which I live? Consulting companies.

When I started, I was in one. He paid me little but it was fine because I was just starting out. I worked hard and sometimes the deadlines were crazy, but it was okay. I got my first raise in a year, and I won over two years, and then ... my contract was terminated, so I had to resign. I was disheartened at the time thinking that I had done something wrong, but then I met a lot of my co-workers as well, right at the same time that it happened. So what happened? The customers changed. You see, when an IT consulting company loses a big client, people lose jobs like me. That was one of my first lessons in this career. Then I went to my next job, which was almost like the last one, except I was getting paid more and the work was still hard. I did a full year and was planning to stay. People told me they were happy with me. But when the year ended, I left. Why? Now that was more off the mark. You see, at this company I met a software architect and learned a lot from him. We even became great friends. Okay, I am aware that my skill was not very good and yet I improved and worked hard, and my bosses were happy with me, so they rated me average and I stayed. My friend, the architect, was even cooler. One month he stayed overnight to finish project work and slept 3 hours a day. For every mistake or mismanagement, bosses yelled at him. One time he got so hot that my boss was practically insulting him. His tenure with the company was more than three years. At the beginning of the project, the boss promised him a big raise if they finished on schedule, but after he finished, he gave nothing. A 3% increase like me, who made much less, and rated it average. I was furious. At lunch I told him that I was wasting my time in that place and I realized that I was too. Luckily, he took my advice and got a much better job. I also found another one next year. The key here was that the timeline was too ambitious and it was done by someone who was not only not part of the project, but did not know the tools and methodology we use (if there were any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) rather, he did not know the tools and the methodology we use (if there were any to begin with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) rather, he did not know the tools and the methodology we use (if there were any to begin with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis) and performed by someone who not only was not part of the project, but did not know the tools and the methodology we used (if there was any to start with). So, second lesson. You only grow in a consulting company if you work on a project with a reasonable schedule or one that is at least achievable (in times of crisis)

In my third job, I worked for a telecommunications company. That was one of the best experiences of my life. I learned new code platforms, met great people, and made even more money. I could even do more things in my spare time. That was the best. Every year he improved in salary and experience. And then ... I found another ugly side to this career. Telcom decided to outsource all the work for more profit next year. So they outsourced to… you know who? Yes. Another consulting company. However, this one was bigger. I signed with them when Telcom was closing its office in my country and I started working with them. And well, salary wise, nothing changed, and my workload is fine, but, well, most of the people I knew left. The experience I am getting is basically not enriching (maintenance work?) And they have not established a proper system for paying overtime or raises. So yeah ... I want to quit again.

My point is that some engineers change jobs to keep increasing not only their experience but also their salary. I hope that there are cases that show that I am wrong, but in the more than 7 years of work that I have been working in this career and especially for consulting companies, I have not found a consulting company that really bets on the growth of its employees seriously . And if they do, I have only seen in 3 cases:

You are a person related to business (manager, etc.)

You have worked for the company for a long time and know key people who can vouch for you (meet people)

You are an exceptional expert and are fortunate to have a word on estimating deadline or having achievable deadlines for the project (and by feasible, I mean at least with crisis time included)

If not, well ... study, improve, be faster, be a good team player, and get jobs that recognize your greatest ability. I read that it has its limits, but if you are not a sociable person like me, and not too greedy then you can become a very good coach with a lot of effort and discipline. If, on the other hand, you are greedy, well ... learn skills with people. Because business is about people and many other things. Anyway, I just wanted to throw that perspective there. Hope it helps a bit.

Never give up.

Brother / sister, never give up. Please understand that most people have no passion. Do you think the person next to you in your cubicle has one? No. But look at how he projects it.

You may be thinking this probably because

  1. Your earnings are relatively less than your counterpart or your friend or your college classmate or anyone you have as a standard.
  2. You might think that probably after you quit smoking, the doors of your dreams would open. Probably not'.
  3. You don't want to do what other people do.
  4. You may want to get rich / rise to the top probably in a year or two.
  5. You don't want to live a normal mi
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Never give up.

Brother / sister, never give up. Please understand that most people have no passion. Do you think the person next to you in your cubicle has one? No. But look at how he projects it.

You may be thinking this probably because

  1. Your earnings are relatively less than your counterpart or your friend or your college classmate or anyone you have as a standard.
  2. You might think that probably after you quit smoking, the doors of your dreams would open. Probably not'.
  3. You don't want to do what other people do.
  4. You may want to get rich / rise to the top probably in a year or two.
  5. You don't want to live a normal middle-class life.
  6. You've gotten used to the saying that IT jobs are boring, since you do the same work as nearly 80% of people with an engineering or background training. That is a myth!
  7. You have been made to work on a domain that your company chooses and not the one you wanted to choose. Never mind. Each domain has its peak. Start to work.
  8. You wanted to do something else, but you keep sitting because of your inner fear.
  9. You are not in a good team, you are not a good manager, you are not in a bad technology, etc.
  10. Your friends enjoy their lives because they follow their passion.
  11. All success begins only after taking a risk. So you want to risk quitting / All motivational people made it only after they quit / quit.
  12. You think you are in a safer area by having a job. So he assumed he would take risks only after leaving that area.

The above are all pure myth. My friend please understand that, what you are probably thinking is also what the world thinks or it may be the guy in your next cubicle.

I don't want to demotivate you here. Many of our generation do not have what is called dream / goal / passion / nothing. Money for our generation is a standard of satisfaction. You can never change that. People might tell you otherwise. It can sound great only when listening when you have money and a job / source of income on hand.

If you have a plan / an interest in something else, probably technology, engineering, teaching, music, theater, etc. and you've been doing it so far, I probably would have suggested otherwise. But that too with 'DO NOT GO OUT'. People I know excel at these things by not quitting their jobs. They still manage very well.

Dude, the people you talk to, spend time with, enjoy, won't stay with you forever. Your friends may contact you probably a month or two after you quit smoking. After that, they would be the same, but the things you see would be different. Your downtime would be much longer now. Then the thoughts will turn like hell. An idle mind is like hell. You cannot control its spread.

Great ideas, thoughts, and innovations will only flow when you're busy. When you become inactive, the thoughts would go in search of money, life, etc.

So, start staying happy where you are and dreaming from where you are. Never dream after you quit. Understand that you will never be in the same state again. Believe that you are always different. Always start thinking 10 years in advance.

Talk to a lot of people. Make friends. Enjoy with them. Tour alone. Read books ranging from fiction to philosophy. See more failure stories than success stories to motivate yourself. Volunteer at everything. Get certified on your job. Attend as many trainings as you can. Start developing an additional skill. If that doesn't suit you, start preparing for your college entrance exams / PSU / can be anything. If these are not your area of ​​interest, you are probably thinking about starting your own business. If so, start working right now. Sleep less, work late into the night, read more, learn more, observe, research, formulate a plan, learn the statistics, find your PVU, do everything until you have a new setup that now takes more time than you can accommodate. But until this step never lose hope. If you are not thinking about any of these or are very confused, don't worry. You are still on track. Keep up with what you're doing, but a little bit happy. Believe me, that will change the whole perspective of the things you have been seeing so far and usher in an avenue of new ideas.

In general, do anything and everything until that gives you maximum satisfaction / a good life / makes you comfortable / is very respectable. Until then, DON'T STOP.

IT has the highest turnover of any field and I am part of the billing. That's right, IT has a higher churn rate than retail. Why?

  • I didn't quit because I had a bad boss. It was pretty good.
  • I didn't quit because I was overworked. See my post on having a job where I do practically nothing. Daniel Hall's answer to Are there jobs where people get paid for doing practically nothing?
  • I didn't quit because I didn't like the salary, it was fine.
  • I didn't quit because it was a toxic work environment, the people were very friendly.

I quit because it was boring. After a few months he had learned his system.

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IT has the highest turnover of any field and I am part of the billing. That's right, IT has a higher churn rate than retail. Why?

  • I didn't quit because I had a bad boss. It was pretty good.
  • I didn't quit because I was overworked. See my post on having a job where I do practically nothing. Daniel Hall's answer to Are there jobs where people get paid for doing practically nothing?
  • I didn't quit because I didn't like the salary, it was fine.
  • I didn't quit because it was a toxic work environment, the people were very friendly.

I quit because it was boring. After a few months I learned his system, fixed his problems, and automated his pipeline. So all you had to do was sit bored waiting for something to go wrong. So I quit.

I love learning new things and solving new problems. That is why I turned to computer science and how I was able to get to where I am today. And that's how I'll be even better in the future, learning new things and continuing to grow.

What do you get when you pay some of the smartest, most creative, and most motivated people out there a ton of money to make them feel bored taking care of your computer system? Record sales volume!

_______________________UPGRADE____________________________

Against the advice of my many commenters, I quit my job of doing nothing to focus on job hunting. It was the right decision, as it allowed me to spend more time searching, motivated me more, and gave me the option to move to where the jobs are. I found my next job just a few months after searching.

I thought you knew what a do-nothing job was, I was wrong. My job was with a consulting company called Infosys. They were supposed to take me from one consulting job to another. Those jobs never materialized, so I sat at home cashing a paycheck for a lot more money than I was getting at my last job.

I used the time to get my current software development job. It's MUCH busier and more fun than my previous jobs. But I had to take a pay cut to get it.

Well ! So far I have spent more than 2 years of my life working in an IT industry. So from my point of view, I can tell you some good and bad points about life in an IT.

  1. Therefore, on the first day when you start your job, you will experience a tremendous feeling and you will be surprised to see the attractive infrastructure of IT companies and you will think Oh man! My life is finally ready now!
  2. Most likely you will join any service company like TCS, Infy, etc. and your package will be between 3.25 L and 3.5 L.
  3. If you are lucky, you will get any development project; otherwise it will land
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Well ! So far I have spent more than 2 years of my life working in an IT industry. So from my point of view, I can tell you some good and bad points about life in an IT.

  1. Therefore, on the first day when you start your job, you will experience a tremendous feeling and you will be surprised to see the attractive infrastructure of IT companies and you will think Oh man! My life is finally ready now!
  2. Most likely you will join any service company like TCS, Infy, etc. and your package will be between 3.25 L and 3.5 L.
  3. If you are lucky you will get any development project, otherwise you will land on some test or support project.
  4. During the first year, you will be very excited about your work, 5 days a week you will work like hell and on the weekends you will be a party animal with a bottle of beer in hand. But after that, you will find that you are doing the same monotonous, repetitive work over and over again and going nowhere.
  5. Starting from the second year, after getting fed up with your IT life, you will start preparing for any government job like SSC CGL, Bank PO or start preparing for some higher studies like MS from USA or Canada or for GATE or CAT .
  6. But if you have an interest in IT and you did not get your favorite technology to work in your first company, then you will start to learn some other technology to switch to another company.
  7. In a daily routine at IT work, you will wake up in the morning around 8 or 9 o'clock, take out the shirt and jeans that you bought last week in some mall with a 50% discount on the offer, get ready and it will come. to office until 10 or 10:30.
  8. Assuming you are in some service-based business, your office time will be like this: start by checking emails in the morning》 talk to your favorite colleagues》 breakfast》 same repetitive work》 many, many complaints about your manager and TL while you have the night snacks》 back to work for a few more hours》 back to the floor or PG.
  9. After you get home, talk to your family, friends, girlfriend, and then start watching web series, movies on Netflix, prime, etc., and then sleep and repeat.
  10. BUT DESPITE ALL THESE THINGS, I WILL SAFELY SAY THAT TODAY IN PRIVATE JOBS, IT IS THE HIGHEST PAYING JOB COMPARED TO ALL OTHER FIELDS. MOST OF MY SMART FRIENDS FROM OTHER BRANCHES SUCH AS CIVIL, MECH, EE, EEA ARE NOW UNEMPLOYED AND EVEN READY TO WORK 8-10K A MONTH.

All the IT people out there, don't forget to vote and follow, if you agree with my answer. 🍻😄

There will be very few answers to this question as there are very few IT 15+ guys doing Quora with a lot of enthusiasm and secondly, while you're at work, commenting becomes difficult. I don't belong to any of them, I'm alive on Quora and I quit exactly after 15 years :)

So here you go

  1. Money - Yes, contrary to popular thinking, most IT people pretend to be rich. In reality, they are in debt or locked in a job that has no growth in a foreign country. Those who started in the 90s era got the most out of IT, but the people of the 2000s era didn't do much.
  2. Low growth in India: most people
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There will be very few answers to this question as there are very few IT 15+ guys doing Quora with a lot of enthusiasm and secondly, while you're at work, commenting becomes difficult. I don't belong to any of them, I'm alive on Quora and I quit exactly after 15 years :)

So here you go

  1. Money - Yes, contrary to popular thinking, most IT people pretend to be rich. In reality, they are in debt or locked in a job that has no growth in a foreign country. Those who started in the 90s era got the most out of IT, but the people of the 2000s era didn't do much.
  2. Low growth in India: Most people after 15 years will fall into two categories: one in India and two in public relations abroad. Bucket one is actually in most cases unable to change jobs and will keep for more than 10 years. The Bucket Two is diverse: it will establish itself as a well performing RP by Indian standard or it will be on a landlocked job. The reason for the low growth in India is that the IT services model was a model based on gross margin, so once its CTC is greater than 25 defaults, growth is practically slow or dead.
  3. Bad social life if I am abroad: I am Bengali and Durga puja abroad sucks big time. The same goes for Ganesh Puja or diwali or Holi. Yes, they do, but it is plastic. It's not fun, it takes place indoors. It's okay if you've seen these kinds of festivals 2 or 3 times in your life, but I've seen it for 10 years and it sucked for me. Tip: Be an organizer to feel better.
  4. Green card trap: US For IT from India, the wait is 15 years. No warranty: what happens if the RP is rejected when you're like 42 years old?
  5. Poor health: need I say more?
  6. Imbalance between capabilities and expectations: The information technology industry offered a lot of work, and during the boom, "trainable" first-year students from B / C / D grade colleges were needed. This model worked and, at the individual, stimulated overestimation of oneself. This points to a later point in life to extend beyond capacity.
  7. There is no career for women: only a handful of women can continue after motherhood at the same rate as a man. It seems that the industry is not pro-babies. Women in IT after 10 years make a lot of commitment to keep the family functioning as roles and salary.
  8. Recent business model changes / disruption: the customer's business model has changed and has accumulated traditional demands. This creates insecurity. Automation is overrated: automation affects regular work and is assigned more to ITES than to IT mid-career roles.
  9. Home Loan: The Main Culprit, The Race to Close a 20-Year Home Loan in 2 Years Has Shattered Many Families I Know.

These points are not applicable to everyone. I was hoping it would help.

I started working in 1993. I was a C programmer at SCO Xenix. Almost no one programs in C. I doubt that anyone actually uses Xenix.

I moved from there to a company that used a 4GL product called JAM by JYACC. I don't think anyone knows what a 4GL is. I guess at one point I could have been the top JAM report writing developer in the world. It was certainly in the top 5… but it could have been just 5 of us. I could make that thing sing. I also learned the PCL language of HP printers at this point, pretty sure no one needs to know it anymore.

I went from there to

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I started working in 1993. I was a C programmer at SCO Xenix. Almost no one programs in C. I doubt that anyone actually uses Xenix.

I moved from there to a company that used a 4GL product called JAM by JYACC. I don't think anyone knows what a 4GL is. I guess at one point I could have been the top JAM report writing developer in the world. It was certainly in the top 5… but it could have been just 5 of us. I could make that thing sing. I also learned the PCL language of HP printers at this point, pretty sure no one needs to know it anymore.

From there I went to a company and built software using the Ingres database, which had its own 4GL. I assume that Ingres became Postgres, but I am sure the 4GL is gone. Postgres is not very popular either.

Somewhere in here I worked in a startup that created applications in… Palm Pilots. What are you saying? Oh yeah, those are outdated.

From there I went back to the company that used JAM. One of my projects was expanding a website that they used to show customers their data. It was built in C. I worked on a website built in C. Actually, it stitched the HTML by hand using sprintf. I can't imagine anyone continuing to do this.

After a while, we built a new system to replace the JAM system using Microsoft .Net 1.1 using Windows Forms. Almost no one uses Windows Forms. Nobody uses .Net 1.1 anymore. The database was SQL Server 2000. I also created a Palm Pilot application for this company.

From there I went to a company and part of the job consisted of supporting a VB6 application. Hey, ditto, no one uses VB6 anymore. They also used classic ASP with VBScript (ditto, and ditto again). They also used Windows Forms and ASP .Net web forms (hardly anyone uses them anymore).

I got out of there and went to a company that was changing everything from ASP .Net web forms to Silverlight because it was going to change the world ... Nobody uses Silverlight anymore.

From there, after a while I went to a company that used Windows Forms, Silverlight, ASP .Net Web Forms, Flex, and a few other things. In a few years, all of those things mostly went by the wayside. We eventually got rid of Silverlight, moved to ASP .NET MVC (which will probably be deprecated by Core) and Windows WPF (which may have been deprecated by UWP ... I'm not sure I haven't done anything in Windows in solid time) . I also did my first VB .Net programming (which is not very popular, but I'm not sure it will become obsolete anytime soon).

I've learned a lot of things that basically became stale or started out that way.

What has not become obsolete is that I know how to create software. Successfully. I don't know if I could do it with any technology, but I think I could do it with any technology worth knowing.

Look, we always have options. Choices that have the ability to push us forward or push us back. At the moment we cannot see the possibilities, we say what to do. And the fact is, we are surrounded by millions of opportunities. You simply need to listen to yourself.

First ask yourself

Why did you start working in this industry?

You really don't like work? Or it's some problem with your boss or company.

Once you are clear about what work you do not want to continue, ask yourself some questions again:

Is it something that fascinates you and you think there is no career in it?

OR

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Look, we always have options. Choices that have the ability to push us forward or push us back. At the moment we cannot see the possibilities, we say what to do. And the fact is, we are surrounded by millions of opportunities. You simply need to listen to yourself.

First ask yourself

Why did you start working in this industry?

You really don't like work? Or it's some problem with your boss or company.

Once you are clear about what work you do not want to continue, ask yourself some questions again:

Is it something that fascinates you and you think there is no career in it?

Or you just can't see other options because you think you have an IT industry degree and won't be eligible for another job. If that's the case, remember that there are people who didn't get any degrees, not even a proper education, and are still working at the top of their chosen field. How?

Because they knew his field of interest. It is totally okay that you are not sure of your interest.

  • Start something that seems to interest you.
  • Learn more about it.
  • Practice those skills.
  • Find something where people need your service.

The rest will take place in itself.

Remind! the world is full of possibilities (options), the point is if you want to do that.

The IT field itself is a field that involves more technical knowledge and physical labor. In addition, it has less deadlines, that is, it does not respect day / night limitations and creates a pressurized environment.
An individual who works in this field and in order to stay in this field acquires / possesses Technical Knowledge and Physical Work Capacity.
It also has Good Payments that attracts / compensates / forces people to work and keep working on it. Which initially makes most of them materialistic.

Now with knowledge come the secondary effects of knowledge, which is the reduction of emotions, with work come

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The IT field itself is a field that involves more technical knowledge and physical labor. In addition, it has less deadlines, that is, it does not respect day / night limitations and creates a pressurized environment.
An individual who works in this field and in order to stay in this field acquires / possesses Technical Knowledge and Physical Work Capacity.
It also has Good Payments that attracts / compensates / forces people to work and keep working on it. Which initially makes most of them materialistic.

Now with knowledge come the secondary effects of knowledge, which is the reduction of emotions, with work come the secondary effects that is the reduction of the time spent with others. The combination of both side effects reduces their social and interpersonal skills, even the individual's family is affected by this. Previously practiced materialism becomes a necessity now and therefore they cannot even leave work.

If an individual begins to balance understanding the pros and cons of this profession, he becomes happier again even if he continues in this field. But not most can know and essentially practice balances.

The above is also true to some extent for professionals in other fields such as scientific R&D, but the pressure is less here.

This thinking is quite natural if you are in your early 20s. The important thing to find out is 'Do you really want to change fields or do you just need a break?' You see that routine jobs often bore and frustrate the masses.

Once you've figured it out, you can consider the following options:

  1. Considering yourself at 20: Although a person can change fields at any time at any age, but at 20 one is free from many responsibilities so that he can try to achieve what he has dreamed of. If you are just a graduate, consider the postgraduate option like MBA or any other in the field that interests you.
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This thinking is quite natural if you are in your early 20s. The important thing to find out is 'Do you really want to change fields or do you just need a break?' You see that routine jobs often bore and frustrate the masses.

Once you've figured it out, you can consider the following options:

  1. Considering yourself at 20: Although a person can change fields at any time at any age, but at 20 one is free from many responsibilities so that he can try to achieve what he has dreamed of. If you are just a graduate, consider the Postgraduate option like MBA or any other in the field that interests you.
  2. If you are interested in civil services, quit your job and start preparing for UPSC and other related exams. Do not be scared by taking risks, it is necessary and at an early age it is only to shape your career. You just need to draw the conclusion that what you will do next should be better for you both personally and professionally.
  3. If you have a graduate degree, consider pursuing academic studies.
  4. If you are not 20 years old and have enough experience, BOOM! You can opt for your own consulting. If possible.
  5. What is your hobby, get it out of you? If you're good at it, why not get people to do well by video lecturing on YOUTUBE by creating your channel?

Once you start doing and trying different things, I am sure you will make the decision.

Thanks

If you have no computer / computing experience, I don't think you will have any problem at work.

But somewhere inside you will never be satisfied.

I think the feeling will be as if your first love was someone else, but you marry someone else, who also has a totally different character.

So my advice will be that if you haven't joined the IT field then don't, you will get paid or get paid a lot, but the satisfaction level will always be zero, so think twice to change the field of not IT to IT.

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