Do you need to have a degree to become a web developer?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Rowan Mccoy



Do you need to have a degree to become a web developer?

You can not. I mean, you could ... But there's no way to get a "decent" job without having a particular skill set. How do you get them? You learn.

Many people undermine education, because "I can learn everything by myself." That's true! In fact, I am a good example of this, as I started my IT career in 2010 and applied for a college degree in 2012. Why did I do it? Here's a bit of truth: you can (if you're stubborn enough) learn to do <whatever you want to do in your life>, but college gives you a huge head start on learning why something works the way it works. As a senior softwar

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You can not. I mean, you could ... But there's no way to get a "decent" job without having a particular skill set. How do you get them? You learn.

Many people undermine education, because "I can learn everything by myself." That's true! In fact, I am a good example of this, as I started my IT career in 2010 and applied for a college degree in 2012. Why did I do it? Here's a bit of truth: you can (if you're stubborn enough) learn to do <whatever you want to do in your life>, but college gives you a huge head start on learning why something works the way it works. As a senior software engineer, I don't see any opportunity to get a good job without being an expert. And the experts know why the technology works that way. As a result, they also know how to quickly learn new technologies (if necessary) and, more importantly, how to build new technologies,

Why is this so, you ask? The answer is simple: the university will not only teach you things, but it will also guide you on what you have to know to understand it. Do you see something "unimportant" on the show and don't want to waste time? You're wrong. But you will get there, eventually.

The last thing I would like to add: my older classmates always told me that I should study while I have time for it: no family, children, etc. because then learning important things would go much slower. I did so, and I have no regrets, as I am currently a PhD student with a great job and many more opportunities waiting in the future.

Think about it.

I will be honest here. Unless the company you're interviewing with is full of computer science graduates, it won't matter. Why? Because computer science degrees don't teach you anything about how software develops in the real world.

I have worked with many CS graduates. Some had master's degrees, others doctorates (I was lucky and worked with a couple of national laboratories). Of all those with higher titles, there was absolutely no correlation between their title and how good they were at software. None. Zipper. Any. The doctorates were the biggest revelation. Some were amazing and some were dumber than a box of rocks when it came to des

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I will be honest here. Unless the company you're interviewing with is full of computer science graduates, it won't matter. Why? Because computer science degrees don't teach you anything about how software develops in the real world.

I have worked with many CS graduates. Some had master's degrees, others doctorates (I was lucky and worked with a couple of national laboratories). Of all those with higher titles, there was absolutely no correlation between their title and how good they were at software. None. Zipper. Any. The doctorates were the biggest revelation. Some were awesome and some were dumber than a box of rocks when it came to designing and building apps. I once worked for a doctoral candidate in mathematics. Guy was very smart, very smart. But ... His code looked like a little boy who grabbed a set of felt-tip pens while Dad was napping and went into town with the overly patient dog. He didn't care either. I knew his code was bullshit.

To go backwards, a company that has all the CS titles will tend to go for that, because, well, everyone has one and you should too. It's sad, but it happens.

I have conducted many interviews with candidates who have just graduated with their computer science degree. Good companies looking to hire a new developer with no real experience will look at problem solving skills, general software knowledge (common control flow, simple data structures, etc. You don't need a degree) and most of all , the ability to _think_. I can't tell you how many developers I've worked with in the past who will be staring at a bug trail, with the answer right in front of them, and they won't be able to figure out what's wrong. Everything else you will learn on the job anyway. All the recent computer science graduates I have ever worked with thought they knew a thing or two, they usually realize that school taught them next to nothing.

If you want to go to school, I would recommend one of the short-term, high-intensity schools. Something like a Coding Dojo or equivalent. We recently hired one of their graduates and he was immediately productive. He even switched it to a different project after a couple of months with a completely new stack (went from C ++ work to ReactJS) and learned it very quickly because he was exposed to other JS stuff in school. Those kinds of schools will tend to teach you skills that are more useful and much more relevant to getting a job. Then once you get the job, if you want to get that degree, just because, then go yourself :)

Yes, I am self-taught. I don't have a title. I never needed one either.

Being a digital media developer requires a wide range of skills, this is very clear!

Now web project development can involve many different technologies, tools and utilities, we have a really long menu of options.

The details are critical here: what kinds of developments are you familiar with.

We can have specialists who are dedicated to a specific stack of options, a WordPress developer, for example, concentrates his attention on this specific area, becoming an expert in the application of the different options available for this CMS, you can see the professional result

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Being a digital media developer requires a wide range of skills, this is very clear!

Now web project development can involve many different technologies, tools and utilities, we have a really long menu of options.

The details are critical here: what kinds of developments are you familiar with.

We can have specialists who are dedicated to a specific stack of options, a WordPress developer, for example, concentrates his attention on this specific area, becoming an expert in the application of the different options available for this CMS, you can see the professional results of these developers here.

We can have Magento developers, who specialize in this platform.

We can also have what is known in the industry as Full Stack developers; These are people who have dedicated themselves to becoming highly skilled people with a variety of different technologies and languages, this involves a lot of time and study and, of course, practical experience; we are talking about lives.

Tertiary education in information technology is not a prerequisite; Many people involved with IT understand that university studies can often be far behind the true industry curve, as they are being run all over the world.

You won't find many academics admitting this, and you won't find many academics working alongside actual development teams in the trenches either!

The reality is that we can resolve to learn and practice all the necessary skills to achieve digital media results, we can join online communities like Github, StackOverflow, Codecamp; we can access all the requirements to learn information technology. In all its many forms without the need to attend a university or college, this is the truth.

We will need personal discipline and a strong desire to learn, the independent learning path is not an easy option!

So the real answer to this question is: No, you don't need a bachelor's degree to become a web developer, it can be an advantage to start this way, all learning is valuable, but the means to acquire skills with information technology are accessible. to us if we can recognize and discern which path we wish to take.

We live in times that allow the individual to learn almost any skill up to a point, so it is up to that individual's own devotion and commitment to build on those skills to become an expert. Executing what we learn is the critical part.

Thanks for the A2A!

So this is an interesting question because you don't weigh in on the exact type of college degree; although I suppose it was meant to mean a degree in Computer Science, it's interesting to think about it in a larger context ...

Before you rant too much, here is the design for a CS headline:

  • Typically required for jobs that actually put theoretical applications, such as data science and machine learning, into practice.
  • Preferred for back-end work, as most work tends to be logic-driven and can benefit from good data structures / algorithms
  • Usually just one line item for a front end job like we show
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Thanks for the A2A!

So this is an interesting question because you don't weigh in on the exact type of college degree; although I suppose it was meant to mean a degree in Computer Science, it's interesting to think about it in a larger context ...

Before you rant too much, here is the design for a CS headline:

  • Typically required for jobs that actually put theoretical applications, such as data science and machine learning, into practice.
  • Preferred for back-end work, as most work tends to be logic-driven and can benefit from good data structures / algorithms
  • Usually just one line item for a front-end job, as most tend to favor experience (especially recent frames) over education


That being said ... how many developers don't have any titles? I know many developers who do not have a formal Computer Science education, but many seem to come from other educational backgrounds. I even have a degree in psychology.

I also think it's interesting to see the diffusion of different subject areas in web development because we also tend to bring some of our background with us:

  • I (psychology background) tend to focus on behavior driven testing / development and intuitive design
  • One of my friends with a math degree loved algorithms and function optimization.
  • Another with a background in finance is interested in data science and predictive statistics.


While it's quite possible that we didn't really need our college degrees, I'd say they certainly helped us find a niche that was tied to our educational experiences.

The best way to get a web developer job is to follow this simple process:

  1. Submit requests. If you are unemployed at the moment, then you should apply for jobs as if it is your full-time job. Submitting an application or 2 per day is ridiculous. I should send dozens a day.
  2. Find people who work for the companies you're interested in on LinkedIn and send them a message. If you've exhausted the traditional application submission process, start messaging dozens of people a day. Let's say you are a web developer interested in working for your company. Do you know of a
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The best way to get a web developer job is to follow this simple process:

  1. Submit requests. If you are unemployed at the moment, then you should apply for jobs as if it is your full-time job. Submitting an application or 2 per day is ridiculous. I should send dozens a day.
  2. Find people who work for the companies you're interested in on LinkedIn and send them a message. If you've exhausted the traditional application submission process, start messaging dozens of people a day. Let's say you are a web developer interested in working for your company. Do you know of any vacancies there? Do you have any tips to improve your chances of getting an interview? Ask them to review your resume. Send them some of your code / examples. Go out and sell yourself
  3. Talk to people you know and see if anyone has connections that they are hiring. You won't know until you ask, and it's no wonder family / friends have other developer friends.

I would also recommend continuing to work / improve your skills. Develop more samples, contribute to open source projects, and gain confidence in your ability.

The barrier to entry as a new software developer can be difficult for anyone. But it is usually more difficult for those without a degree, as recruiters tend to prefer those candidates for the title. However, after you've worked your way into the industry and have a few years of experience under your belt, you will find that the job search is much easier.

Good luck and keep applying!

Your best option is to gain experience building small projects using HTML / CSS / Javascript, maybe Ruby or Python or C #, database like SQL, version control system like Git / Subversion, also collaboration tools like Slack, implement your applications for platforms such as Heroku, Firebase. Platforms like codecademy, freecodecamp are good for learning the basics of these tools. Contributing to open source projects while working remotely with others on the same project, working on your problem solving skills like Project Euler is good as problem solving is an important part of development work. If you don't have a degree

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Your best option is to gain experience building small projects using HTML / CSS / Javascript, maybe Ruby or Python or C #, database like SQL, version control system like Git / Subversion, also collaboration tools like Slack, implement your applications for platforms such as Heroku, Firebase. Platforms like codecademy, freecodecamp are good for learning the basics of these tools. Contributing to open source projects while working remotely with others on the same project, working on your problem solving skills like Project Euler is good as problem solving is an important part of development work. If you don't have a degree, you need to develop your project expertise, contribute to open source projects, have code to demonstrate to prospective employers (have apps to show the case, as well as regularly contribute to their Github repositories), be able to do well on whiteboard challenges (Project Euler should help here). You also need to have good teamwork skills, as team scrum meetings take place on a daily basis, either in your employer's office with your team or remotely with collaboration tools. Since development is quite complex, you need to be able to read and work with other developers' code, as well as communicate clearly with end users, other developers, QA, their managers, so working on open source projects should help here. as well as contributing regularly to their Github repositories), Being able to do well on Chalkboard Challenges (Project Euler should help here). You also need to have good teamwork skills, as team scrum meetings take place on a daily basis, either in your employer's office with your team or remotely with collaboration tools. Since development is quite complex, you need to be able to read and work with other developers' code, as well as communicate clearly with end users, other developers, QA, their managers, so working on open source projects should help here. as well as contributing regularly to their Github repositories), Being able to do well on Chalkboard Challenges (Project Euler should help here). You also need to have good teamwork skills, as team scrum meetings take place on a daily basis, either in your employer's office with your team or remotely with collaboration tools. Since development is quite complex, you need to be able to read and work with other developers' code, as well as communicate clearly with end users, other developers, QA, their managers, so working on open source projects should help here. You also need to have good teamwork skills, as team scrum meetings take place on a daily basis, either in your employer's office with your team or remotely with collaboration tools. Since development is quite complex, you need to be able to read and work with other developers' code, as well as communicate clearly with end users, other developers, QA, their managers, so working on open source projects should help here. You also need to have good teamwork skills, as team scrum meetings take place on a daily basis, either in your employer's office with your team or remotely with collaboration tools. Since development is quite complex, you need to be able to read and work with other developers' code, as well as communicate clearly with end users, other developers, QA, their managers, so working on open source projects should help here.

You can get a job without a degree. There are many companies that will hire you based on your experiences and skills in the sector. But you may face the situation where to get a promotion or a better pay scale in another company you need some academic qualifications.

But there are also cases like these:

  • There are many universities where the curriculum is retroactive or you have little or no scope to develop your skills with the help of your university. I know, this may be hard to believe, but there are institutions like this that have come across me so many times in my life.
  • Or the degree m
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You can get a job without a degree. There are many companies that will hire you based on your experiences and skills in the sector. But you may face the situation where to get a promotion or a better pay scale in another company you need some academic qualifications.

But there are also cases like these:

  • There are many universities where the curriculum is retroactive or you have little or no scope to develop your skills with the help of your university. I know, this may be hard to believe, but there are institutions like this that have come across me so many times in my life.
  • Or the title can cost a lot.

In these types of situations, I suggest you complete your degree after landing a job with your salary. There are many people who have an office in the morning and take classes at night.

Freelancing is also a great option. Although it will be difficult to win at first, as it will not have a reputation in the freelance market. But as you keep working and earn 5 stars and consecutive great reviews from your customers, you will gain a great reputation in no time. All you have to do is be patient. In addition, it must be taken into account that the freelance market is an unreliable source of work in the sense that the amount of work found in the market varies. But if you can gather a few clients and their trust, they will always come back to you when they need a job.

Good luck and patience.

well. It helps to have some kind of degree. I arrived at my place with my purse and purse ready to go and only received questions about my education. I had an associate's degree from a university that wasn't my name and I told him that most of the things I had to show him were better than what I did in school, but he wanted to know. so I told him and he was not impressed. Of course, you will meet all kinds of companies, but I have had the worst experience with marketing companies. I currently have a long-term contract with Wetfish. legit she saw my portfolio (www.vfpmedia.com/) and I asked her about her june

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well. It helps to have some kind of degree. I arrived at my place with my purse and purse ready to go and only received questions about my education. I had an associate's degree from a university that wasn't my name and I told him that most of the things I had to show him were better than what I did in school, but he wanted to know. so I told him and he was not impressed. Of course, you will meet all kinds of companies, but I have had the worst experience with marketing companies. I currently have a long-term contract with Wetfish. He legitimately saw my portfolio (www.vfpmedia.com/) and I asked him about his junior developer position and they hired me. all i did was work on javascript via freecodecamp, implemented a mail server on the node from a tutorial, and updated my CSS skills.

you don't need a title. you need proof that you can do the job. Also learn github and work with other people on git hub if you can. It also helps if you are willing to move to other places or if you live in a city that has your skills that you trained for. (mine didn't) if you go to college, don't go into debt, and they give you lots of electives, choose to learn the languages ​​and frameworks that the jobs are looking for. don't pay as much attention to the notes. make sure you understand what you are doing. and join coding clubs in your city. it really helps cheer you up.

In conclusion, you will get more bang for your buck if you don't go to college and study hard on your own. If you can't spend 15 grand like I did

Yes, it is possible, but when I did it, in 2007, it was not easy at all and it took me 4 hard years to be considered a decent professional. Truth be told, I still very much doubt myself these days, but that's another story!

However, the professional world has begun to realize that a computer science degree is not everything when it comes to being able to use critical thinking skills to solve problems, a skill that I have been led to believe is so much more. relevant and useful than anything else. my classmates were taught in their computer science degrees.

However, from time to time, I am asked about certain software patterns, which I consider

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Yes, it is possible, but when I did it, in 2007, it was not easy at all and it took me 4 hard years to be considered a decent professional. Truth be told, I still very much doubt myself these days, but that's another story!

However, the professional world has begun to realize that a computer science degree is not everything when it comes to being able to use critical thinking skills to solve problems, a skill that I have been led to believe is so much more. relevant and useful than anything else. my classmates were taught in their computer science degrees.

However, from time to time, I am asked about particular software patterns, which is a huge blind spot in my professional knowledge as I was never taught what the definition is from a textbook.

If you can solve problems, and enjoy difficult ones, and have already taught yourself a certain amount of programming, a computer science degree may not be right for you. But talk to other people who have degrees and see what they learned, and weigh your options carefully.

EDIT: I guess the real question at the end of this is, would I do it again? I'm pretty sure I can say "yes" to this, but I would have waited a bit to be more confident of my abilities. I hit a lot of potholes from being too young and ending up in the proverbial "deep end" without much help between 2007 and mid-2010. After that, it started to get a lot easier.

No, you don't need a college degree to be a web developer. However, most employers still require a college degree as a prerequisite for job applications. It is possible to do it on your own as a freelancer / small business owner, but understand up front that it is a tough line to work with and the first 2 years will be the hardest.

If you want to be a web developer, try going to a university that will allow you to build strong networks for friendships and future jobs. You will still need to take modern web development classes online from websites like Free Code Camp or Udemy because u

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No, you don't need a college degree to be a web developer. However, most employers still require a college degree as a prerequisite for job applications. It is possible to do it on your own as a freelancer / small business owner, but understand up front that it is a tough line to work with and the first 2 years will be the hardest.

If you want to be a web developer, try going to a university that will allow you to build strong networks for friendships and future jobs. You will still have to take modern web development classes online from websites like Free Code Camp or Udemy because universities are generally behind the curve when it comes to modern web development. The university must also have a strong alumni network. Based on my personal experience, this has provided me with all my stable employment opportunities and a nearly stress-free life for 13 years. I attended Texas A&M University for undergraduate and graduate studies.

For the software developer possibly ... web development is definitely not a necessity.

I am about to start my new job in web development, at 30 years with no degree and without any business experience in web employment, I have worked in corporate manufacturing so there were not even transferable skills.

I have written it here

Sam Deacon's answer to "I was late for programming", how much time should I spend to land a junior web developer job?

Basically a degree in cs will help, sure, but if you can show passion, interest and basically want to dive into the world of web / commun developers

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For the software developer possibly ... web development is definitely not a necessity.

I am about to start my new job in web development, at 30 years with no degree and without any business experience in web employment, I have worked in corporate manufacturing so there were not even transferable skills.

I have written it here

Sam Deacon's answer to "I was late for programming", how much time should I spend to land a junior web developer job?

Basically a degree in cs will help, sure, but if you can show passion, interest and basically want to dive into the world / community of web developers.

Things like staying up to date with SEO, the relevant backend framework goes a long way, as well as going the extra mile, for example listening to shoptalkshow.com or web forward podcasts on your commute to work.

Give me a message if you have any questions

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