Do you have to wear an identification plate for your work? It bothers you?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Reuben Brooks



Do you have to wear an identification plate for your work? It bothers you?

I am now retired, but the last few months I worked it came from the dreaded 'company' that we would all wear pins with our full names on them. First of all, it's a really stupid idea if we have to deal with someone who might be obsessed with us, I worked for an upscale women's store that specialized in full care services, putting together wardrobes and styling for special occasions. Men came in and while their women were in the dressing rooms they flirted with us. We had to be careful to be friendly but distant and not offend them. We talked a lot about how his wives were so nice and how m

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I am now retired, but the last few months I worked it came from the dreaded 'company' that we would all wear pins with our full names on them. First of all, it's a really stupid idea if we have to deal with someone who might be obsessed with us, I worked for an upscale women's store that specialized in full care services, putting together wardrobes and styling for special occasions. Men came in and while their women were in the dressing rooms they flirted with us. We had to be careful to be friendly but distant and not offend them. We talked a lot about how nice their wives were and how much they would enjoy the event or their vacation plans.

Since we were working in that environment, we wore great clothes, punching holes in the silk felt sinful, we got our clothes at a discount, but we paid for them. I ended up putting my pin on a chain. And don't use it whenever possible.

I did it for a job. I refused to put my real name on it. They wanted your full name and I didn't want my full name to be available for the whole world to see, especially since my first and last names were the only ones in the phone book. (Willow was not a common name when I was a young adult).

My boss was great and let me put another name when I explained the situation, and he checked the phone book. The only thing he asked me was that I didn't pick a name that was too crazy (like Querellena Kent, which was a name he jokingly suggested. And yes, I was a huge fan of DC comics, if you catch the oddity in the

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I did it for a job. I refused to put my real name on it. They wanted your full name and I didn't want my full name to be available for the whole world to see, especially since my first and last names were the only ones in the phone book. (Willow was not a common name when I was a young adult).

My boss was great and let me put another name when I explained the situation, and he checked the phone book. The only thing he asked me was that I didn't pick a name that was too crazy (like Querellena Kent, which was a name he jokingly suggested. And yes, he was a huge fan of DC comics, if you get the weirdness of the name) because everyone would call me that, so that the employees wouldn't confuse me if someone came in when I was out and said, "I was working with ___________."

He loved that boss. He was a really understanding human being.

Along these lines ...

I was the head of security at a hospital and managed to get management to stop putting the last names of the staff on their identification tags. Two young nurses came to see me complaining that some 'weirdo' was calling them at home being obscene, threatening, etcetera.

He was approached by the local police and during his trial he told the court that he selected these two women because they were so (damn) pretty and their addresses and phone numbers were easy to find. "They told me who they were on their identification tags."

From time to time I will mention to someone in store management that you may want to review.

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Along these lines ...

I was the head of security at a hospital and managed to get management to stop putting the last names of the staff on their identification tags. Two young nurses came to see me complaining that some 'weirdo' was calling them at home being obscene, threatening, etcetera.

He was approached by the local police and during his trial he told the court that he selected these two women because they were so (damn) pretty and their addresses and phone numbers were easy to find. "They told me who they were on their identification tags."

From time to time, I will mention to someone in store management who might want to review their "name tag" policy. If someone really needs to know the last name of the store staff, you can always ask the management after identifying yourself.

Yes, I had to wear a name plate at work, it did NOT bother me at all. Why the hell would I do it?

(a simple nameplate)

There are many advantages to requiring employees to wear a name tag.

  1. Inspiring the enthusiasm of employees. It gives employees a sense of identity within the company by feeling good to have their hard-earned name and title on display for all other co-workers to see and motivates them to work harder.
  2. Uniting employees as a whole. The identification badge can make employees feel connected to each other by having a “we are family” feeling.
  3. Increase transparency between clients and the organization. A nameplate gives customers the false impression that
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(a simple nameplate)

There are many advantages to requiring employees to wear a name tag.

  1. Inspiring the enthusiasm of employees. It gives employees a sense of identity within the company by feeling good to have their hard-earned name and title on display for all other co-workers to see and motivates them to work harder.
  2. Uniting employees as a whole. The identification badge can make employees feel connected to each other by having a “we are family” feeling.
  3. Increase transparency between clients and the organization. A nameplate gives customers the false sense that they can get inside the company, since the public knows the name of each employee and their department of work. Clients would feel that such an organization is more trustworthy than one with a veil of mystery.
  4. Checking the work of employees. Every word and action of the employee will be monitored by customers every second. Badges keep track of when employees entered and what time they entered and left their workstation, thus preventing some employees from relaxing.
  5. Advertising for the company. The use of a badge with the company logo and the name of each employee and their travel and return home with it can play an advertising role for the brand of the product and the service to the society for the company.
  6. Relationships with customers. The nameplate acts as a bridge that helps customers and employees to interact well with each other. Provides customers with a sense of security, familiarity, accessibility, closeness, intimacy and trust with the company and employees. It can help customers quickly identify and recognize whether employees belong to the organization. It is especially important when customers are dealing with a company that handles high-tech devices or sensitive information. If a customer has a question or needs help, they'll easily know who to ask for help from the department name on the employee's nameplate.
  7. Make the company look more professional. A professionalism would make a company more attractive to potential clients or clients. You can also help convince a current or former customer to come back and continue doing business with the company.
  8. It can help the organization collect more feedback from customers to help them run the business more successfully. The name badge seems to tell customers: "Please let me know if our service is not good enough, let us know what you think and how we can improve our service" and so on. By looking at the badge and trusting it, customers like to show their opinion on the quality of products and services. And this will help the sales of the products and expand the business of the company.
  9. For security reasons. Employees must swipe their name card whenever they enter the building or operate important equipment. When leaving the company, they must deliver the credential. If an emergency arises and it is necessary to contact an employee in person, the presence of identification tags makes it easier to identify staff members.
  10. Help new hires ease the adjustment period. Wearing your nameplate can make former employees get to know you faster. Badges can also make it easier for visitors to know who they are talking to and which department each person is in. When I was a volunteer at the Calgary Food Bank, every time I started my job, I would use my ID card like this or stick a piece of paper on my left breast with my name on it.

Thank you for reading.

Sources:

  1. 4 important reasons to use identification tags: influence identity
  2. 7 Reasons Your Business Needs To Use Identification Badges (And How To Easily Do It In Business)
  3. 6 reasons to wear ID badges - Thistle, Inc.
  4. The importance of employee name tags
  5. The use of employee name tags in the workplace

My first day of duty the reception sergeant took me aside and said: “Look boy, you get into some trouble, you make some kind of mistake on the street, you come in to see me first. If it's an honest mistake, I'll see that everything works out. Unless you lose your badge or your gun. You make your butt belong to the Boss! "

When he was the boss, an officer's badge was stolen during a robbery at his home. It never recovered in the years I worked there, without discipline.

Another officer lost a badge. We gave each officer 2 badges, one for the shirt and one for the coat, so they didn't.

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My first day of duty the reception sergeant took me aside and said: “Look boy, you get into some trouble, you make some kind of mistake on the street, you come in to see me first. If it's an honest mistake, I'll see that everything works out. Unless you lose your badge or your gun. You make your butt belong to the Boss! "

When he was the boss, an officer's badge was stolen during a robbery at his home. It never recovered in the years I worked there, without discipline.

Another officer lost a badge. We gave each officer 2 badges, one for the shirt and one for the coat so they didn't have to stop and reattach the badge every time they took off their coat. The missing insignia was the insignia on his coat. She was sure it fell in her squad, but several people couldn't find it. A week later, the patrol car went to the city workshop to have it repaired. They had to pull out the front passenger seat to get to the electrical wiring. When they pulled out the seat, they heard a clink. Somehow, the plate had come off his coat and got caught in the steel frame at the bottom of the seat. Probably fell to the ground under the seat, the squad hit a bump somewhere and the plate bounced off the frame.

I am the co-founder of Rypple. We create social software that helps teams work better together. A key element of Rypple is a bottom-up service for creating and awarding badges, based on peer recognition and goal achievement. So for us, this question is not "what if" but "what happened" when we add badges to the mix at work. To be clear, we do not "replace" titles with badges; we just compliment (as suggested by Ben and others).

We have implemented Rypple badges at a number of large companies such as the Gilt Group, Mozilla, and Great Harvest. We are learning a lot about what works, what doesn't and

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I am the co-founder of Rypple. We create social software that helps teams work better together. A key element of Rypple is a bottom-up service for creating and awarding badges, based on peer recognition and goal achievement. So for us, this question is not "what if" but "what happened" when we add badges to the mix at work. To be clear, we do not "replace" titles with badges; we just compliment (as suggested by Ben and others).

We have implemented Rypple badges at a number of large companies such as the Gilt Group, Mozilla, and Great Harvest. We are learning a lot about what works, what doesn't, and how to design the right system.

Here's what we've learned: Good things happen ... More recognition, better insight into what people actually do, easier reviews, and pride in achievement and reputation. But it requires careful system design based on game design.

Discovery # 1: Badges can amplify positive behaviors like recognizing yourself and collaborating on goals (aka ... epic missions).

People like to thank others for significant help and accomplishments. This can be tremendously motivating. We made it incredibly easy for people to give themselves thank you badges and see them on their profiles. This increased the frequency with which people recognized the achievements of others. Even companies that had a "thank you" system saw their activity levels double when we replaced it with our thank you badges.

People like to embark on "epic missions" with others, just like in games. We make it easy for people to do this using social goals. They then collect badges that represent their victories. We found that people quickly began creating their own (very creative) social goals rather than waiting for a top-down goal assignment. And these self-created social goals often had higher activity and completion rates around them than top-down goals. Why? Ownership on these targets! We also found that people like to see the missions (or objectives) they have completed increase their work reputation. So we made it easy to see these goal achievement badges on people's profiles.

Discovery # 2: A badge system designed around intrinsic motivators doesn't get silly.
"The elements of the game are like an amp: first there has to be a genuine sound - a value, an interest, a motivation - for the amp to do something good" (* Sebastian Deterding, Gamification / UX designer and researcher). When badges are awarded for completing meaningful activities, they are not insignificant, silly, or inflated. Consider the following examples:

Example 1: insignia of the US military campaign that are highly symbolic and appreciated:


Example 2: The Purple Heart medal. A powerful mark of merit:


Example 3: "Toy-deal": Even the people of the great old banks have badges that are appreciated and displayed with pride!


When we worked with our clients to analyze how their badges were being used, we found that the vast majority of the badges awarded were for genuine achievement and to express genuine gratitude. We're not surprised because we designed the system to encourage meaningful badge creation and distribution. We've also seen badges (which anyone can create and customize) take on a shared meaning: they become reliable indicators of achievement for each other.

Discovery n. 3 - Game design can help you create the right badge system.
In order for our system to work properly, we incorporated many of the lessons on game design. Jane McGonigal, Byron Reeves, and J. Leighton Read have done a great job demonstrating how games can help solve real-world problems, including those in the workplace.

There are some misconceptions about games and badges that should be cleared up.

  • Misconception No. # 1 - Game design is all about badges and leaderboards. Many "gameified" systems are based on the misconception that collecting badges is motivation enough. That's not enough. Truly engaging games are designed around intrinsic rewards like mastery, competition, and self-efficacy. Badges are simply markers of progress in this game.


  • Misconception No. # 2: games have to be fun. The fact is that economists developed game theory to mathematically capture human behavior in strategic situations where multiple players have to compete or collaborate for scarce resources (such as in the workplace). Game theory has been used to develop war strategies and more. Serious things.


  • Misconception No. # 3: games are not appropriate at work. The reality is that work is already full of games and game elements. Promotions are like leveling up. Bankers' toys and inflated pseudo-titles are no different than badges. Then there is the career game where you compete for a job.


  • Work is already full of games. They are mostly poorly designed games, but they are there. So don't be overly concerned that the badges are "too game-like" or that "people play them." They are already doing it; the question is about designing productive games.


Design Lesson No. # 1: Good badge design isn't about adding features. It is a careful design process. You can't save a shitty work environment by screwing badges. The activities that people earn badges for at work should be meaningful.

This requires many careful iterations of: understanding your employees, designing the system, observing behaviors, refining, and iterating. A critical element: having real game designers working with executive and HR experts.

Design Lesson No. # 2: do it slowly and very carefully to avoid unwanted consequences. Markers are a common element of the game. Fun and harmless in the virtual world of games. But in the workplace, depending on the context, they can feel like another form of control and pressure. Unless it's designed correctly. Similarly, you need to be careful about when and how you use monetary incentives tied to various activities in the game. For example, in the beginning, we ran a test where we allowed people to collect a $ 25 reward when they invited their coworkers to join Rypple. This cohort of users was less likely to invite their coworkers than a control group that did not have a reward attached. Why? People told us that it didn't seem appropriate to collect cash rewards for inviting coworkers!

Design Lesson No. 3: simplicity counts. The harder we make people do things with too many options (unnecessary fields, grades, options, etc.), the less they do.

We recently published a Slideshare with more lessons learned about business gamification: http://www.slideshare.net/Rypple/work-better-play-together-on-enterprise-gamification

I have arrested dozens of dealers for cheating at various casinos that I have been involved with. But they are not cheating the players, they are cheating the casino. It is not uncommon to simply remove the fries from the rack. I have caught a merchant shoving french fries in their mouths when they yawn, under the watch band, in their hair, in their sleeves and in their pants. That is why dealers "clear their hands" by extending their fingers towards the camera and rotating both hands before they leave the game or touch their bodies.

Other methods that dealers use to cheat are simply colluding with players.

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I have arrested dozens of dealers for cheating at various casinos that I have been involved with. But they are not cheating the players, they are cheating the casino. It is not uncommon to simply remove the fries from the rack. I have caught a merchant shoving french fries in their mouths when they yawn, under the watch band, in their hair, in their sleeves and in their pants. That is why dealers "clear their hands" by extending their fingers towards the camera and rotating both hands before they leave the game or touch their bodies.

Other methods that dealers use to cheat are simply colluding with players who will either overpay or not accept losing bets. You might be wondering why they would try this in such guarded settings, but people relax and forget that the cameras are there. Other people are desperate and have drug or other addictions that they must endure. It is sad to have to arrest a merchant, but it is an unfortunate part of the business.

Question: Is it rude in your country to call an employee by his name, if it is printed on a badge he is wearing?

It is not rude here in the States, although it is uncomfortable.

After all, you don't know the person, you usually don't want to know the person, and most of your interactions will be short and direct. You are not his friend; and calling them by name doesn't really help you or them in most circumstances. Simply saying "Excuse me" while looking directly at them and asking a question (or questions) is often more interaction than most of us.

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Question: Is it rude in your country to call an employee by his name, if it is printed on a badge he is wearing?

It is not rude here in the States, although it is uncomfortable.

After all, you don't know the person, you usually don't want to know the person, and most of your interactions will be short and direct. You are not his friend; and calling them by name doesn't really help you or them in most circumstances. Simply saying "Excuse me" while looking directly at them and asking a question (or questions) is often more interaction than most of us want or need.

You are not "insulting" the person by not referring to them by name, unless you are talking about them to someone else and they are standing there while you do this. In fact, from their facial expressions when you call them by name, most seem to wish you didn't.

Retail and service jobs are just as terrible. They are poorly paid, their employees receive little respect from clients or their employers, and high levels of turnover make them short-term positions for all but the least ambitious among us. I have found that if you keep your interactions short, courteous, and professional with people who work in those roles (and who are required by company policy to wear nameplates or uniform ribbons), you can avoid using your name and compelling them. the role of artificial familiarity.

Simply say, “Hello everyone, my new name is new name and this is what I want to be called, effective immediately. I know it will take some getting used to and there will be an adjustment period, but I can be patient during this time. Thank you for your time ”, and leave it at that. Correct when necessary and in time it will be as if it has always had that name.

I went through something similar when I legally changed my name and middle name. It took some people time to adjust, but others refused to acknowledge my name change and stubbornly insisted on calling me by my old name.

only me

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Simply say, “Hello everyone, my new name is new name and this is what I want to be called, effective immediately. I know it will take some getting used to and there will be an adjustment period, but I can be patient during this time. Thank you for your time ”, and leave it at that. Correct when necessary and in time it will be as if it has always had that name.

I went through something similar when I legally changed my name and middle name. It took some people time to adjust, but others refused to acknowledge my name change and stubbornly insisted on calling me by my old name.

I stopped responding to anyone who called me by my old name. They called me rude, inconsiderate and childish and I just told them they weren't calling my name, so I wasn't ignoring them or being rude.

I still have problems with some people who refuse to accept my name change. I just ignore them until they call me by my new name.

It happens from time to time (but I imagine it happens more often in stores that focus on customer service, like M&S and Wait Rose, as opposed to stores that offer good value for money like Tesco, etc. , of course).

While in college, I used to work at Marks and Spencer, and when clients (especially older ones) were happy or received good service, they thanked me using my name. For me it was an indication of a job well done, so it made me happy.

There were other occasions, when customers referred to dependents by name, if they wanted immediate attention to their inquiries, etc. Wor

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It happens from time to time (but I imagine it happens more often in stores that focus on customer service, like M&S and Wait Rose, as opposed to stores that offer good value for money like Tesco, etc. , of course).

While in college, I used to work at Marks and Spencer, and when clients (especially older ones) were happy or received good service, they thanked me using my name. For me it was an indication of a job well done, so it made me happy.

There were other occasions when customers referred to dependents by name, if they wanted immediate attention to their inquiries, etc. It works well in this case and I have seen that attendees try harder when this happens.

In your example:

If Janet is working at the supermarket checkout and a customer she doesn't know says "Good morning Janet",

I would definitely consider him friendly and interested. Unless Janet was super hot and the same person came over every day to ogle her and drool over her.

Do I have to legally wear an identification tag at work?

Unless you're in the military, you won't be arrested for not wearing your "Hi, I'm Joe" dog tag while flipping burgers and asking "Do you want fries with that?"

But, if your employer requires identification cards for their employees and you refuse to comply, then you are violating your employer's rules of conduct and uniform standards, you can be fired for that.

Is it really worth getting fired? All other jobs in the fast food and hospitality industries have the same requirements.

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