Do routers provide WiFi? If you had to buy a new router and configure it, would you get WiFi?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Ben Riley



Do routers provide WiFi? If you had to buy a new router and configure it, would you get WiFi?

The absolute basic answer to your question is no, if I make an assumption then I can say yes, but since I made that assumption I have to make another assumption so maybe not. Let me explain so it makes a lot more sense.

By definition, a router is a device that bridges an external connection (WAN, from your modem / ISP) and an internal connection (LAN, your local computers / devices), and has the brains / protocols to allow LAN devices to share the single WAN connection.
In the vast majority of cases, all home routers have a built-in wireless access point, so yes, all of these devices have WiFi. Upon

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The absolute basic answer to your question is no, if I make an assumption then I can say yes, but since I made that assumption I have to make another assumption so maybe not. Let me explain so it makes a lot more sense.

By definition, a router is a device that bridges an external connection (WAN, from your modem / ISP) and an internal connection (LAN, your local computers / devices), and has the brains / protocols to allow LAN devices to share the single WAN connection.
In the vast majority of cases, all home routers have a built-in wireless access point, so yes, all of these devices have WiFi. Once you get out of the home / consumer routers, most commercial / business routers don't have wifi.

So:
NO: 100% of all routers don't have WiFi.
YES: Almost all home / soho routers are "wireless routers" and therefore have WiFi.

Now where that other assumption comes into play is what you are defining as "WiFi." A large part of the masses will use "WiFi" to refer to the Internet; these are not interchangeable words and they mean completely different things (hench why you can't have an internet connection but your computer / phone says you have a wifi connection).
WiFi is simply a set of protocols that allows a device to communicate with the router wirelessly, it is simply an alternative to the cable that would otherwise connect the computer to the router. The Internet is a connection from your network to other computers / servers around the world.
In short, WiFi connects your device to the router, it is the modem (and your ISP's connection) that connects your router to the Internet.
So if you are asking if a router is all it takes to have an internet connection, the answer is NO, you need a modem and internet service from an ISP.

Yes, a WiFi router will offer wireless home networks, all devices connected to it will be connected to each other, allowing some games, file transfers, etc., but only between devices connected to that router. If you want that WiFi router to provide internet access to those devices, you will need to pay for an internet subscription and connect it to the router.

I did not exactly understand your question, I will still try to answer.

By having WiFi I guess you mean internet access. Well in that case no, to have WiFi access you will need to have a broadband connection. You can contact the service providers that serve your area. Once you have a broadband connection, you will need a ROUTER to amplify the signals for your devices to connect and use the Internet service. You can also use the router to extend the WiFi signal to cover a larger area and easily connect devices from further afield.

I hope this helps! 😇😇

Peace out ✌

I guess by "WiFi" you actually mean WiFi with internet access. If so, then no, you will also need to sign a contract with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Without this, the router would only provide you with a local network, allowing the devices in your home to communicate with each other but not with the internet.

Technically the answer to your question is no, but in practice the answer is yes.

Almost all consumer routers (for home use) these days include WiFi.

Commercial routers are usually just routers without WiFi. These are things ISPs use.

To configure your router for wired Internet connection, follow the steps below.

NB: Here I use a NETGEAR router. The process is the same for other routers or slightly different.

1. Connect your modem to the Internet port of the router and your computer to any of the LAN ports.

2. Turn off and on your computer, router, and cable / broadband modem. Wait for everyone to finish booting.

3. Open a web browser and type the IP address of the router, which would be http://192.168.0.1 or http://192.168.1.1 in the address bar and press Enter.

  • You will be prompted to log into the router.
  • The default usage
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To configure your router for wired Internet connection, follow the steps below.

NB: Here I use a NETGEAR router. The process is the same for other routers or slightly different.

1. Connect your modem to the Internet port of the router and your computer to any of the LAN ports.

2. Turn off and on your computer, router, and cable / broadband modem. Wait for everyone to finish booting.

3. Open a web browser and type the IP address of the router, which would be http://192.168.0.1 or http://192.168.1.1 in the address bar and press Enter.

  • You will be prompted to log into the router.
  • The default username is admin and the default password is password.
  • Username and password are case sensitive.
  • If the default username and password don't work, you may have changed your password.

Try other passwords that you might have changed to. Otherwise, a factory reset is required to restore the router to factory defaults. To perform a factory reset, see Restoring a NETGEAR Home Router to Factory Default Settings.

4. Click on the Configuration Wizard.

The Setup Wizard screen appears.

5. Select Yes and click Next.

The setup wizard detects the type of Internet connection. For wired Internet connections, the Configuration Wizard detects dynamic IP.

6. Click Next. The router saves the configuration.

Note: Do not change the default settings unless your Internet service provider has provided you with specific DNS information that you must configure.

7. (Optional) To check if you are connected to the Internet, select Router Status under Maintenance.

Look at the IP Address field to see if you have a valid IP address (that is, not blank or filled with zeros, such as 0.0.0.0).


Everything is done, just enjoy !!!

OKportal technology

Charter / Spectrum modems / routers are pretty good. I was set up with a newer Arris surfboard and it can handle all my LAN demands with no fuss ... it has MOCA, network storage, 2.4ghz + 5ghz simultaneous dual band WiFi and media server capabilities and it also handles my VOIP landline, so, not bad. The interface is quite simple for beginners and quite configurable for advanced users. You really can't go wrong, even for a big house.

There is a big downside to renting it from Spectrum, so I decided not to keep it but to return it, after all, nothing comes without a catch.

First the

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Charter / Spectrum modems / routers are pretty good. I was set up with a newer Arris surfboard and it can handle all my LAN demands with no fuss ... it has MOCA, network storage, 2.4ghz + 5ghz simultaneous dual band WiFi and media server capabilities and it also handles my VOIP landline, so, not bad. The interface is quite simple for beginners and quite configurable for advanced users. You really can't go wrong, even for a big house.

There is a big downside to renting it from Spectrum, so I decided not to keep it but to return it, after all, nothing comes without a catch.

First is the rental fee. I think it was something like $ 10 a month. At that rate, buying my own (the exact same model) from Wal-Mart has already paid for itself in less than a year.

Second, the WiFi service is disabled until you call Spectrum and ask them to enable it. It costs an additional $ 7 / month (I think, or almost) to keep it enabled. That to me is the biggest scam. The only advantage of paying for Spectrum WiFi is that it gives you access to their regional WiFi HotSpots, but my city doesn't have any, so what's the point? Also, my cell phone gives me all the mobile data I may need.

Basically maintaining your router and having Wi-Fi enabled will cost an additional $ 20 / mo (after taxes) AND YOU WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO "OWN".

If you're not rich like me, you'd better buy yours and return the one they sent you.

Edit: I forgot to mention when I originally replied. The first time I called tech support while using the modem they provided me, they were able to configure the modem / router from their end, they had a 'back door' and they could change any settings they wanted. Since I bought mine (same model) they don't have remote access like before. For me personally I prefer that they can NOT remotely control my router, others may prefer it.

Also, since I provided my own modem, all the 'problems' have been 'my fault' according to Spectrum technical support. My neighbor (lives 3 doors down) is a Spectrum technician, and a good friend, on his day off, hooked me up with a new drop from the pole (good new cable) and since then I haven't had any problems.

You can do it.

A secondary router can be added to a home network or a small work network. If you want to add more computers or other devices to your home or work network but have no more ports available, you can add a secondary router.

In addition to increasing the capacity of your network, the router can be placed in areas without Wi-Fi coverage where the wireless signal is weak or non-existent.

These are the steps to follow:

  • Step 1
    Check the IP address of the main router and write it down.
  • Step 2
    Connect a computer to the second router (desktop / laptop to one of the Ethernet ports p
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You can do it.

A secondary router can be added to a home network or a small work network. If you want to add more computers or other devices to your home or work network but have no more ports available, you can add a secondary router.

In addition to increasing the capacity of your network, the router can be placed in areas without Wi-Fi coverage where the wireless signal is weak or non-existent.

These are the steps to follow:

  • Step 1
    Check the IP address of the main router and write it down.
  • Step 2
    Connect a computer to the second router (desktop / laptop to one of the second router's Ethernet ports).
  • Step 3
    Access the web page of the second router.
  • Step 4
    In the Basic Settings (Basic Settings) subtab, look for IP Address or Local IP Address.
    NOTE: If the IP address is the same as on the main router, change the third octet (the number in the third box) to a different value.
    Example: Primary router: 192.168.1.1 -> Secondary router: 192.168.2.1
  • Step 5
    Click Save Settings.
  • Step 6
    Disconnect the cable from the computer and connect it to one of the main router's Ethernet ports.
  • Step 7
    Transfer the Ethernet cable connected to the secondary router to your Internet port.

I hope that helps,

OKportal technology

It does not provide enough information to answer your question completely, but I will try to help you anyway.

It has a fiber optic line, a "landline", a router provided by an ISP, and an ASUS router. You are trying to connect all of this in an optimal configuration.

Your fiber optic line should already be connected to something. Don't mess with it. Around here, you would normally be connected to an ONT (Optical Network Terminal), which is the fiber equivalent of a "modem." Basically "fiber in, wired ethernet out". The ONT could also include some routing functions. If there are multiple Ethernet LANs

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It does not provide enough information to answer your question completely, but I will try to help you anyway.

It has a fiber optic line, a "landline", a router provided by an ISP, and an ASUS router. You are trying to connect all of this in an optimal configuration.

Your fiber optic line should already be connected to something. Don't mess with it. Around here, you would normally be connected to an ONT (Optical Network Terminal), which is the fiber equivalent of a "modem." Basically "fiber in, wired ethernet out". The ONT could also include some routing functions. If there are multiple Ethernet LAN ports on the box that the fiber is connected to, then you know that it is also a router.

If the ONT is not a router (the most common), connect the Ethernet LAN port (possibly only) on the ONT to the WAN port of the ASUS router. Then connect to the Asus router via cables and / or wirelessly as desired.

If the ONT is a router, you can connect any of the LAN ports of the ONT to the WAN port of the Asus.

It is the "landline" that is more confusing. If the "landline" leaves the ONT, it is actually a VOIP line, not a landline. A true landline is a POTS (Plain Old Telephone System) copper line that is copper to the "head office" of the Telephone Company. These are getting pretty rare.

Unfortunately, the term "landline" is also being used incorrectly to represent landline REPLACEMENT products, including IP and cellular telephony solutions. Bottom line ... if there is an "OUT PHONE" on your ONT, it is not really a landline, but it will act like one. You make sure your phone lines are not connected to an actual landline phone, and then you connect it to your home phone network. You will have a dial tone on all the phones in your home.

At this point, everything should be working. The only concerns would be "double NAT", if your ONT is also a router, and the possibility that the ISP's fiber device and ASUS could be transmitting WiFi and interfering with each other.

You don't need to worry about the "landline" slowing down your Internet, even if it's VOIP. The bandwidth required for a phone call is negligible compared to any fiber plan you've ever heard of.

Have you ever had to call your ISP's Internet support line in the middle of the night because your Internet was down, slow, or misbehaving?

You know that super annoying thing where you can tell the highly underpaid and even less informed person on the other end of the line that you are reading you a step-by-step guide in a three-ring binder, walking you through all troubleshooting steps?

And finally, does it start to work (because they reset something on their part) or did they escalate to someone who really knew something and could fix things?

Yes?

Well. Yes, and

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Have you ever had to call your ISP's Internet support line in the middle of the night because your Internet was down, slow, or misbehaving?

You know that super annoying thing where you can tell the highly underpaid and even less informed person on the other end of the line that you are reading you a step-by-step guide in a three-ring binder, walking you through all troubleshooting steps?

And finally, does it start to work (because they reset something on their part) or did they escalate to someone who really knew something and could fix things?

Yes?

Well. If you don't have your router / modem, all those three ring binders don't work. But they don't have enough training to know what to do instead. So you go around the Doom Drain, repeating things that don't work because they can't get past Step 13 in their three-ring binder, because you don't have the same router / modem they expect.

That is…. a problem.

The time was, if you didn't have the modem provided by the ISP, they immediately transferred it from the call center to first-rate network engineering. Not so much these days.

I hate using the craptastic hardware they provide. Frontier FIOS in my area used a piece of hardware that was manufactured at the end of its useful life in 2014 through last year. Think about that for a minute. When my dead router is replaced by the field technician, he replaces it with a probably slightly less dead router, which is also about six years old.

But.

If I replace it with something shiny and new…. If something goes wrong, I have to diagnose it, not just on my part, but on his part. And while I can do that (trust me, if you're asking me this, you can't; I've led network engineering and carrier ops groups for decades) to be successful at that requires that, by some miracle, I get someone to sign in. the line that really knows what they are doing and is willing to talk to me.

I prefer to risk buying lottery tickets hoping for the windfall that will allow me to buy their entire operation and fire everyone.

Standards are great things. Open architectures are great things.

Customer service, around now, kills dead goats. Execute what you are given and be glad that it does most of the time.

I think you meant "how to configure", right?

Setting up a wireless router doesn't have to be a test. And while router manufacturers are to be commended for making their products easy to install, these tips will make the process even easier. I'll also show you how to make sure your home network is as secure as possible, and I'll explain some network details that user manuals often overlook.

Most router manufacturers now offer smartphone and tablet apps that you can use for the first installation and subsequent adjustments. In fact, some companies no longer care about browsers

Keep reading

I think you meant "how to configure", right?

Setting up a wireless router doesn't have to be a test. And while router manufacturers are to be commended for making their products easy to install, these tips will make the process even easier. I'll also show you how to make sure your home network is as secure as possible, and I'll explain some network details that user manuals often overlook.

Most router manufacturers now offer smartphone and tablet apps that you can use for the first installation and subsequent adjustments. In fact, some companies no longer care at all about browser-based user interfaces. I think it is better to have both options so that you can decide which is the best approach.

Technology has made things much easier and routers are not exempt. Even if you don't particularly appreciate DIY, you won't have much trouble setting up a wireless router because fortunately, it is incredibly easy. Newer router models can be managed or monitored via a web interface, once you get past this hurdle, router setup is a breeze. If you are not convinced, follow these steps and find out how easy it is

  • Connect

Before configuring your router, you must be connected to the Internet. Setup is also easier if you have a modem. The first step you should take is to turn off your modem and disconnect the ethernet cable from your computer; then connect the cable to an internet port that should be on your modem. Activate the modem and router and connect your computer to the router's LAN port with another Ethernet cable. After these steps, you should have an internet connection.

You can read more of the following online references:

  1. 11 Ways to Boost Your Wireless Router's Signal
  2. How to set up a wireless router
  3. Site updated frequently for router details (brands, how-tos, and tricks)

Other Guides:


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