Did the Great Wall stop Genghis Khan?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Dwayne Rivas



Did the Great Wall stop Genghis Khan?

The Great Wall was one of the stupidest investments to stop foreign tribes! He did not stop any bodies that he intended to invade !!!

Genghis Khan was really dead at the time of the Mongol invasion of Europe / Poland, but his original great army commanded by Subutai, the greatest general in history and Batu, not too bad, himself, massacred the armies of Russia, Hungary and Poland with the consistency of an atomic clock, and scratched much of Poland like an easily stolen car, raped, looted, murdered, burned and enslaved much of the country, and trotted relatively unscathed back to Mongolia to choose the new Khan. The Mongol invasion of Europe was one of the greatest feats of arms in military history ... and "What if?"

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Genghis Khan was really dead at the time of the Mongol invasion of Europe / Poland, but his original great army commanded by Subutai, the greatest general in history and Batu, not too bad, himself, massacred the armies of Russia, Hungary and Poland with the consistency of an atomic clock, and scratched much of Poland like an easily stolen car, raped, looted, murdered, burned and enslaved much of the country, and trotted relatively unscathed back to Mongolia to choose the new Khan. The Mongol invasion of Europe was one of the greatest feats of arms in military history ... and "What if?"

(Above: This is what all the battlefields in Russia / Poland / Hungary looked like after facing the Mongols from Subutai)

Studying the unstoppable journey of the heir across all of Russia from Siberia to the gates of Vienna, fighting in the winter, at night, without ever losing, is an incredible read for any historian, especially. military.

The Mongols nearly wiped out the Polish / Moravian / Knights Templar army at Legnica, on April 9, 1241, with, (from David Chambers and Jack Weatherford, each saying Henry had 25,000 at most but much less 7,000) vs 4 -5,000 Mongols (about 1/2 a tuman) totally defeating and probably killing 6,500. Poland was almost defenseless and could not raise another army while they were there. The Mongols made some half-hearted attacks on some fortified positions, but under closer scrutiny of the few days in "siege", a low number of forces and a smaller and less effective siege team (they also had huge trabuckles available), they were doing “Recon” of these new forts that they had never faced before.

(Doubt my word about Subutai? Read and be surprised :)

Subutai - Wikipedia Mongolian General under Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan Subutai Medieval Chinese Block Print Representation Born c. 1175 Died 1248 (between 72 and 73 years) Mongolian nationality Other names Latin transcriptions: Subetei, Subetai, Subotai, Tsubotai, Tsubodai, Tsubetei, Tsubatai Classical Mongolian: Sübügätäi, Sübü'ätäi Modern Mongolian: Sübeedei, Middle Mongolian: Сүeбээд edei ", Сүбэдэй Occupation General title Örlög baghatur, Noyan of a Mingghan Spouse (s) Tangzi Khatun Zainshi Khatun Tenzii Khatun Yangdai Khatun Family Children Aju (grandson) Jelme (brother) Chaurkhan Qaban, Neriääbütätätätäi Modern Mongolian: Сүбээдэй, Sübeedei. Sʊbeːˈdɛ; Chinese: 速 不 台; c. 1175-1248) was a Mongol general and the main military strategist for Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan. He led more than 20 campaigns and won 65 pitched battles, during which he conquered or invaded more territory than any other commander in history as part of the expansion of the Mongol Empire, the largest contiguous empire in human history. 1 He often achieved victory through imaginative and sophisticated strategies and routinely coordinated movements of armies operating hundreds of miles apart. Subutai is well known for the geographical diversity and the success of his expeditions, which took him from Central Asia to the Russian steppe and Europe. Early life edit Historians believe that Subutai was born in 1175, 2 probably just west of the upper Onon River in what is now Mongolia. Some historical accounts claim that he belonged to the Uriankhai clan, known as the "reindeer people", a group of Siberian forest dwellers who did not live like the Mongols of the southern plains. As a member of the reindeer people, according to these accounts, Subutai lacked the natural training in horsemanship from birth that all Mongols possessed, making him a stranger to them. 3 However, recent studies have discarded this earlier narrative. Stephen Pow and Jingjing Liao note in the Journal of Chinese Military History (Brill, 2018): 4 It also appears frequently in secondary literature that Subutai was from the Reindeer People, as there was a group of people who lived in the forests in the northwest. from Mongolia who had the exonym Uriyangqai, regardless of whether they were Turkish or Mongolian speakers. In describing these forest people, Rashiduddin (Rashid al-Din) notes that they raised wild animals in the forest, traveled on sleds, and detested the idea of ​​living in the steppe and raising sheep or cattle like typical Mongol nomads. Obviously, this description of the Uriyangqai has been appended to Subutai in the literature. Also, since the tribal name was later associated with the Tuvans, there is a persistent myth that Subutai was Tuvan. However, as Rashiduddin points out elsewhere, the group Subutai belonged to was "separate and distinct" from the forest people. In fact, the clan that https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subutai turned to and hated the idea of ​​living in the steppe and raising sheep or cattle like typical Mongolian nomads. Evidently, this description of the Uriyangqai has been appended to Subutai in the literature. Also, since the tribal name was later associated with the Tuvans, there is a persistent myth that Subutai was Tuvan. However, as Rashiduddin points out elsewhere, the group Subutai belonged to was "separate and distinct" from the forest people. In fact, the clan that https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subutai turned to and hated the idea of ​​living in the steppe and raising sheep or cattle like typical Mongolian nomads. Obviously, this description of the Uriyangqai has been appended to Subutai in the literature. Also, since the tribal name was later associated with the Tuvans, there is a persistent myth that Subutai was Tuvan. However, as Rashiduddin points out elsewhere, the group Subutai belonged to was "

At the decisive Polish Battle of Legnica, the much more agile Mongolian light cavalry allowed the Polish knights to hit and injure them, but as usual it was a "theater" and half of the Mongolian light cavalry "fled. across the plain, feigning panic. , using their standard "dogfighting" tactics, vehemently pursued by the Polish cavalry, feeling "victory and glory!" drawing them further and further away from the Polish infantry.

(One of the biggest advantages the Mongols had over their European enemies is that they were not encumbered by traditional European notions of "honor." The Mongols were eminently practical, true professionals, and only fought where and when it suited them, where the odds they were in their favor. The best, most sensible and victorious armies understand that, like Falstaff, "discretion IS the best part of courage", and they fight in a way that may seem "cowardly": they run where the enemy is too strong, turn around and fight when and where it is weak Europeans from the 300 Spartans to Bela of Hungary would fight against even impossible odds for glory, for a flag, for Hellen of Troy, for “The honor of the regiment!"The Mongols only fought for victory and only when they could win, and be able to travel 70 miles a day to their enemies 12 miles a day, did they have the tactical advantage of doing so).

The Polish and Templar knights just couldn't catch them for some reason and a few miles from the battlefield after the knight formation was a disaster, BAM! The Mongols turned on a dime, shooting their horses underneath them, killing or, better yet, terrorizing them, with their 160 pound compound-recurve bows, more powerful than the famous English longbow and only half the long, firing a piercing horn. points and then slaughtered and then now - suddenly - "infantry" trudging, and quickly weary, through the mud. It was a slaughter.

“The decisive battle for Poland occurred at the Battle of Legnica on April 9. A charge of European knights appeared to cause that section of the Mongol line to flee, prompting Henry II to send his cavalry to pursue them. However, the Mongols had simply pushed the knights away from their supporting infantry and used a smokescreen to prevent the remaining infantry and cavalry from seeing their more advanced knights being surrounded and slaughtered. Once the Polish and German knights were killed, the rest of the Polish army was vulnerable and easily surrounded. Later Polish chronicler Jan Długosz claimed that the Mongols caused confusion in the Polish forces by shouting "Flee!" in Polish through the smoke screen.

Meanwhile, the other half of the Mongol archers using Chinese gunpowder in small iron pots that hung from their saddles, set fire to the grass around the now abandoned infantry, frightened, suffocated and blinded them and, while being hit with high-speed arrows from close range, he yelled a single word in newly learned Polish: "RUN !!"

The ever brave Polish infantry was sadly "led" by one of the worst and most cowardly Polish commanders of all time, Mieszko II the Fat, and in the great military tradition learned from Arthur of Great Britain in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail: "FLEE !!" and led the defeat, riding a horse faster and obviously stronger than his foot soldiers and escaped while they, almost like a man, were shot down and slaughtered over the next few days.

the Mongolian scholar who taught here in St. Paul at Macalister University, and I think he claimed the whole battle was ... spurious, ridiculously false, never happened, a Mieszko-making myth, and no serious Mongolian scholar has never included in any serious case. The Mongols will work in about 150 years. In my almost 50 years of studying Mongolians, I have at least 40 Mongolian texts in various languages, and no one says that this Great Polish Victory took place, not even a battle. If it had, then THIS battle would have been * the * only real victory against the Mongols in their entire campaign to invade Europe, from Siberia to the gates of Vienna, and dozens of studies, scholarly articles and books would have been written on this subject. . and we would have been analyzing it for 800 years. None of these truly historically honest books exist. It is very likely that there was a skirmish there, but no battle and in broad daylight against bows that can reliably kill at nearly 300 yards, Mieszko the Fat, famous and vilified for his proven cowardice in Legnica, would especially. of his poor performance 13 days later at Legnica, he was probably the one who lost the “400 men”.

This "Battle of Raciborz" itself can basically only be found in three places, and I've been looking for it for years. Except for a few, very suspicious and very "patriotic" from Eastern Europe, it is only mentioned on Wiki. (What! It MUST be true then!): In "Mieszko", himself, "the Battle of Raciborz" and the "City of Raciborz" ... and they all only refer for verification ... wait ... three-way circular pull. One of my favorite British historians, Tom Holland ('Rubicon', 'Persian Fire') did a great BBC radio show once with untrusted sources, including Wiki, unless there are plenty of other sources to back it up. This spurious battle has very, very few. And, coincidentally, the British science historian, James Burke, in fact he did a wonderful article on this very topic in one of his lovely 'Connections' or 'Connections II' (I can't remember which one, 40 years ago and I'm getting old!), series, out there, to this day , towns in Poland and on the passes west of Hungary / Poland celebrating this and other fictitious victories against the Mongols. "They came up for our pass and we kicked them back!" In reality, they were Mongolian light reconnaissance patrols with orders NOT to engage in heavy fighting, just looking for the best way to get through the mountains to Vienna. The Mongols disappeared so suddenly after having completely defeated the Russians and Europeans that their sudden departure back to Mongolia for the election of the new Khan, convinced demoralized Poles / Hungarians and much of Eastern Europe that their sufferings and horrific casualties had somehow miraculously overwhelmed the Mongols, caused them more harm than originally thought, "forcing" them to retreat in a disorganized panic. LOL. His campaign was one of the largest in history and if decisively winning every battle would cause the largest army in history, an army that * had * just * captured an empire twice the size of Romes in a tenth of the time, winning the 99% of the 40+ year time to "run home" ... so I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you! An obvious lie, but a humane and totally forgivable lie. Remember the joy of the Trojans when they realized that the Greeks had "set sail, "Maybe for the best," as Andy Dufraine put it, but in the hands of a clever foe, it can be devastating. an army that * had * just * captured an empire twice the size of the Romans in a tenth of the time, gaining 99% of the time for over 40 years to "flee home" ... so I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you! An obvious lie, but a humane and totally forgivable lie. Remember the joy of the Trojans when they realized that the Greeks had "set sail, defeated, fled in disorganized panic." leave them a wonderful statue of a horse to "honor" them) Hope is a wonderful thing, "perhaps for the best," as Andy Dufraine put it, but in the hands of an intelligent enemy, it can be devastating. defeated, fled in disorganized panic!

But attacking Poland was primarily protecting the northern flank from the Mongols, while Subutai and Batu, even more importantly and almost simultaneously, were again, nearly annihilating a much larger and better Hungarian army to the south in Hungary at the Battle of Mohi, killing according to Chambers. / Weatherford, approx. 60,000 out of 65,000 Hungarians against probably 8-9,000, big losses for the Mongols, but I will personally take the odds of killing 60,000 of them to 8,500 of mine, and many of these were probably auxiliaries who also often fought on the front lines. .

Some underestimate the size of the entire invading Mongol army, but Weatherford says probably between 140,000 and 150,000 men, Mongols and auxiliaries, and between 50 and 60,000 Mongol troops. But don't sniff out his auxiliaries: Kipchaks, Chinese, intractable Merkits, men from tough nomadic tribes as tough as Mongols, most almost Mongols except in name.

Hungary, like Poland, was for the most part defenseless and possibly 40% of the Hungarian population was killed or enslaved in the next looting, and Hungary was so devastated that it took 40 years to recover and rebuild.

Back to Poland: The average Polish / German "soldier" was poorly trained, poorly armed, inadequately, at best, armored, poorly supplied, low morale, mostly local recruits and even many German miners arrived armed only with picks and shovels.

(Above: this is what many of them looked like.)

The Mongols were the largest army in history, the original great army of Temujin, before, as predicted, their conquests pulled them out of the harsh steppe and into the luxury of Chinese palaces where they quickly became "soft". But that was later, and Subutai's men were full-time professional soldiers, 24/7/365, the best archers in history, trained with the best bows in history from the age of 5 to be able to kill at 300 yards. The best riders in history except the Comanches, trained since the 3rd, hard as steel being raised in the harshest climate imaginable, from temperatures ranging from -55 ° C in Uvs Lake to + 40 ° C in the desert of Gobi.

They could cover 70 miles a day, day after day, and they could do 100 in a pinch. (What modern mechanized unit can match 2021?) Its logistics were unique in military history, especially. their supply lines ... as they had none: each averaged 5 lifts each, all lactating mares milking daily, giving them large fresh amounts of yogurt and cheese. They were masters with their bows and hunted constantly, catching small game as small as the marmot (think the little marmot) at 35 yards, ten yards more on average than the famed English archers. They killed and ate deer rats. Yes, they actually liked to eat rats. These guys were THE badass of all time! Daily fresh protein vs. your enemies' dry carbs / crackers.

Its recon / intelligence was almost the best in history, with wide-ranging scouts, pony-express messaging systems, and thousands of paid spies. And they had, through their allies, the famous Merchants of Venice, (whom they met /. They wooed through their Persian merchants captured in the Black Sea), spies in all the courts of Europe, in the cities, in the the general staff, in the great castles, even with Frederick's court and in the Vatican, it is rumored, for a decade before they even headed west.

Their horses were fast, well trained, and could literally trot for days. The best armor of the Templars was chainmail, but the Mongols had a laminated type that was significantly better, and it was only second to plate, which would not come for another century. About 2/3 archers, they had 1/3 heavy cavalry that could crush enemy formations after being decimated by archers, and even heavy ones had bows.

(Above: This is what a lot of * them * looked like. "These two things are not like the other." - Sesame Street.)

But the news that the Great Khan Ögedei had died the previous year along with disagreements between the Mongol princes Batu, Guyuk and Buri caused the descendants of the Great Khan to return to the Mongol capital of Karakorum for the kurultai who would elect the next Khagan. and it probably saved the Polish lands from being completely invaded by the Mongols. 6 "- WIki

There was no attempt to actually capture the entire country, but they stripped much of Poland like an abandoned Buick, eventually selling their thousands of Polish (and Hungarian and Russian) captives, mostly women and children, to Venetian merchants who traded in the Black Sea when they headed home. Italian merchants sold the tragic souls to Muslim countries, including many to Egypt, where, coincidentally, many of the male children would find themselves in their army and get a measure of "revenge" against the Mongols for decades to come ... but that's another history.

They discovered that there was little loot to be gained compared to the wealth of China and the Middle East, and the Mongols returned home. They returned 40 years later, where the Hungarians detained them, but they were not the same Mongol men or army as those of Temujin / Subutai; They had softened, now they knew his tactics and were only a shadow of what they were before. Men change as they age, as do armies. Was the US Army of the Spanish American War the same Army of World War II 40 years later? Was the US Army of WWII the same as the Army for the most part in peacetime 1985?

(Above: All the armies of Europe if the Mongols had stayed).

A question arises from this: Could the Mongols have conquered Europe if the Great Khan had not died? You mean every army, country, castle, city? No, but they wouldn't have needed it. They absolutely could have wiped out Frederick's army of the Holy Roman Empire, divided and misdirected, divided between his poor feces huddled in the many fewer, much smaller than Germany's imagined castles, and his quality troops engaged in active fighting. in Italy against the Army supported by the Vatican, unable to break free even if they wanted to. The other nations of Europe, all hating, fighting and killing each other, were, All. Single. One. Involved in wars, crusades and rebellions of their own, (it was a very violent time, 1241,) from Ireland to Egypt, and * they * would not come to the aid of the other,

Frederick and the other kings of Europe would have paid loyalty and taxes to the Mongols and would have set up some trade / diplomatic centers in some key cities to keep the tribute / tax flow, and they left very few royal soldiers there. The main merchants, * the * richest men in Europe, the Venetians, who had been giving them recognition for over a decade, would have aided them and would have paid or threatened other leaders (the Mongols occupied with a combination of true terror and incredibly generosity and honesty, understanding human nature, always a valuable skill, knowing a great occupation seduced and corrupted as well as terrified.) The Silk Road would have started in Paris, not Constantinople, and as Jack Weatherford writes in his'

Detractors say that German castles, lack of fodder, excessive rain, small number of troops, a tougher country would have stopped the Mongols. Sorry, but I can counter ALL of these wrong statements ... but that's another answer.

Thank you for reading.

(Above: Oh yes, the Mongols had the best siege engines and engineers in the world - captured Chinese who also brought the Mongols ... gunpowder!)

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