Did Elon Musk meet Steve Jobs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Ben Dawson



Did Elon Musk meet Steve Jobs?

Yes, they met and it didn't work out.

Source :

Go at 1:00:30 to check out Musk's meeting jobs.

Once, in an interview, Elon Musk said that at a party he was willing to meet Steve Jobs, but Steve was in a super rude mode, so he couldn't meet him.

The evolution of Elon Musk: the good, the bad, and the ugly

As someone who considers himself up to date with the latest news and trends in all design and innovation, I was surprised when I saw a Facebook post in December. My friend was calling Elon Musk for being an idiot (and no, he wasn't one of those Facebook friends who rants about everything). He was referring to a Twitter battle between Musk and Jarrett Walker, a public transportation policy consultant with a doctorate in humanities.

Their dispute on Twitter started due to Elon's comments at an AI conference. Musk had shouted publ

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The evolution of Elon Musk: the good, the bad, and the ugly

As someone who considers himself up to date with the latest news and trends in all design and innovation, I was surprised when I saw a Facebook post in December. My friend was calling Elon Musk for being an idiot (and no, he wasn't one of those Facebook friends who rants about everything). He was referring to a Twitter battle between Musk and Jarrett Walker, a public transportation policy consultant with a doctorate in humanities.

Their dispute on Twitter started due to Elon's comments at an AI conference. Musk had criticized public transportation as a "pain in the butt" and that you could end up carpooling with someone "who could be a serial killer." This led to a series of tweets from Walker targeting Musk, saying that Musk wanted to create a public transportation system designed for the protection of the elite. To which Musk simply replied, "You're an idiot."

Up until this point, he had always thought of Elon Musk as a great leader and an innovation guru. I had nothing but respect for him. But these comments really touched me. After a quick Google search, I saw a couple of other articles that cast it in a negative light. This made me wonder if I was the jerk for thinking he was a great guy all the time. It also made me realize that I really didn't know much about him. This left me with a burning question: is he an idiot or a thought leader that we should aspire to be?

With Christmas fast approaching, I added the biography of Elon, Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX and the search for a fantastic future, to my wish list. I decided that this internal debate could only be answered with a thorough investigation. What follows is my quest to answer this question. During my journey through Ashlee Vance's incredible book, my thoughts on Musk went back and forth seeing the good, the bad, and the ugly in him. So I decided to divide Musk's life into 6 stages highlighting each of these different sides. Only after looking at all the parts was I able to come to a conclusion to this question.

Little boy musk

  • The Good: As a child, Elon had an insatiable appetite for learning. I often read a book a day. His most notable achievement came after he convinced his father to buy him a Commodore VIC-20 (an old computer). According to the manual, it is supposed to take around 6 months to complete all the BASIC lessons. He stayed up for 3 days in a row and finished everything. Then he designed a complete video game about it; whose source code was published in a magazine that earned him $ 500.
  • The bad: He was teased and bullied as a child. Sometimes this amounted to physical violence. On one occasion he was beaten so badly that he passed out and was hospitalized for a whole week.
  • The ugly: His father seems to be the darkest and most private aspect of his life. It seems like he may have been abusive, maybe not physically, but at least mentally. While Musk talked to the author about most of the issues, he refused to talk about his father saying “It's good for making life miserable. I don't know how someone becomes like him. "

First business musk

  • The good: he left South Africa alone with nothing and no one. He went to Canada, where he remained for a time, without a permanent home, until his brother joined him. They headed to Palo Alto and started their first business. Zip2 was basically mapquest before mapquest (which was Google Maps before Google Maps). It would end up selling for $ 307 million. Cha-ching.
  • The Bad: While Elon and his brother were able to create a successful company, they struggled with the powers of their investors. Investors forced the product onto media companies as more of a business directory rather than the B2C address Musk had hoped for. To make matters worse, Elon also experienced his first canceled meltdown catastrophe (#foreshadowing).
  • The ugly: Less than a decade after being essentially homeless in Canada, Elon was now Silicon Valley's last rich man. It is here that we see the first signs that Elon is potentially turning into an idiot. He bought one of the 62 McLarens (really expensive cars) in the world. He drove it so much in the Valley that he began to earn a reputation for being an idiot.

The young and rich musk

  • The good: In addition to buying McLaren, Elon invested all his money in his next company, a company that would change the banking industry. At the time, people said they were crazy and that consumers would never trust Internet security for online banking. His company, http://X.com, was more successful than anyone would have thought possible. It even beat out its biggest competitor, PayPal, started by Peter Thiel when they agreed to merge and Elon became the largest shareholder.
  • The Bad: 'Wait, I thought Elon founded Paypal?' - you might be thinking to yourself. Well, while Elon was on a plane starting his honeymoon, one of the most disgusting coups of all time occurred in Silicon Valley. After the plane landed, he headed straight back to try and save it only to be kicked out as CEO. They were later renamed PayPal.
  • The Ugly: After another horrible merger process, Elon finally had some time to step back and go on their honeymoon. However, he ended up contracting malaria in South Africa and nearly died from it. One doctor said he was one day away from dying. After 6 months and 45 pounds lost, he survived. This was just in time for eBay to buy PayPal for $ 1.5 billion, bringing Elon $ 250 million. Cha-ching! While this may sound like a great thing, a book titled The PayPal Wars was published right after the deal that depicted Elon as the villain of the entire company.

Photo by SpaceX via Unsplash

Starting SpaceX Musk

  • The Good: After his near-death experience, Elon reviewed his childhood dreams of going to Mars. He visited the NASA website one day and found no plan, not even mention, of going to Mars. Puzzled, he headed to Russia to see if he could buy a rocket himself. After being pushed around with ridiculous prices, Elon immersed himself in books studying how rockets are built. On his plane ride home from Russia, he stated that he would build the rocket himself with a spreadsheet detailing how to do it. Thus was born SpaceX.
  • The Bad: While SpaceX was in full home mode, Elon's first child, Nevada, was born. Unfortunately, he died of sudden infant death syndrome.
  • The Ugly: At SpaceX, Elon quickly earned a reputation as a staunch leader. One employee said: “If Elon wasn't happy, you knew it. Things could get ugly. "Even one of SpaceX's best employees, Steve Davis, experienced Elon's carelessness. Davis was once assigned a task that seemed so impossible that another engineer said," No other engineer Any other aerospace company would never have tried. "The assignment was to take a piece that was listed for $ 120,000 and build it on Elon's proposed budget of $ 5,000. Davis spent nine months and dedicated his life to it. In the end, was able to do it for only $ 3,900! Davis emailed Elon detailing his greatest achievement to which Elon simply replied 'Ok'.

Tesla Musk 'Foundation'

  • The Good: Elon had always seen a future of fully electric cars. So when Martin Eberhard and Marc Tarpenning approached Musk about becoming the first investor in a company called Tesla, Elon agreed. I wanted the car to be a picture of the sustainable future. I wanted it to be a luxury brand and not a 'silly-looking Prius'. So he had a lot to say with the creation of the company in Silicon Valley (as opposed to Detroit) and with the visual design of the car.
  • The Bad: As soon as Tesla created their first viable concept car, they decided to have a big press event. The event was a success with 30 high-profile customers pre-ordering the car for $ 90,000. The bad news for Elon was that he was not listed as a founder in the press release. To make matters worse, a NY Times article about the company also left Elon Musk out. I was angry.
  • The ugly: When Tesla was starting to work to fulfill its first round of pre-ordered cars, things weren't going so well. The car parts were too expensive and everything was late. Musk wasn't happy, so it was his turn to plan a hit. He asked the board to replace Martin Eberhard as CEO. They agreed and the original founder of the company left. After an interim CEO, Musk took over in 2008.

Photo by Matt Henry via Unsplash

Leader in SpaceX, Tesla, Hyperloop, SolarCity and The Boring Company, Musk

  • The Good: At this point, Elon has become adept at leading multiple companies under extreme pressure at the same time. In 2008, things were not looking very good for Tesla and SpaceX. By Musk's calculations, he only had enough money to save one company. Rather than panic, Elon was able to stay calm long enough for SpaceX to win a contract to become NASA's official supplier to the ISS. A similar "Tesla could go bankrupt" situation happened again in 2013. It was so bad that Elon actually had a handshake deal with Google to buy and save Tesla. This never happened, as Tesla's sales team was able to beat projections and its shares soared.
  • The Bad: Elon's leadership style remained fierce (to say the least). To accelerate the pace of the Tesla Model S design, they had two groups of employees working 24 hours a day. To quote the author, "It's never enough for Musk." For example, in 2010 SpaceX had just successfully launched its Dragon capsule; And just before the party, Musk called his top executives to yell at them (in a tux in front of his loved ones) because one of the parts of a future rocket was late.
  • The ugly: Since he ran multiple companies at once, his ugly side has definitely reached its ugliest heights. Elon got divorced and his ex-wife, Justine, wrote a lot of nasty articles on her blog about him. He was sued by the original founder of Tesla, Martin Eberhard, for his expulsion from the company. And the crown jewel of his ugliness came from the treatment of his longtime executive assistant, Mary Beth Brown. Basically, he did everything for him in every company. She never left his side. So one day she asked to be paid as an executive. He told her to take a two-week vacation and that she would try to see if she could do her job. When she returned, he told her that he no longer needed her. Note: he denied it on Twitter 2 years after the book was published.

THE UNIVERSAL THEORY OF MUSK

Throughout Elon's evolution, I struggled to find an event that would define him. There are so many ups and downs that I couldn't point to one moment and say 'Yeah, he's an idiot for this.' or 'Yeah, he's someone we should aspire to for that.' I had to look at the whole of his life to make sense of it.

What was clear throughout the book is that Elon operates differently than most successful people today. Jeff Hammerbacher, one of Facebook's early engineers, says that "the best minds of our generation are thinking about how to get people to click on ads." And Elon agrees with him saying, “I think there are probably too many smart people who are into internet, finance and law matters. That's part of the reason we haven't seen so much innovation. "But it is this statement that reveals that Elon does not seek these small innovations. He always pursues his larger purpose.

I would like to die thinking that humanity has a bright future. If we can solve sustainable energy and be on our way to becoming a multiplanetary species with a self-sustaining civilization on another planet ... I think that would be really good. - Elon Musk

In the final paragraph of the biography, the author ends with “I asked Musk directly how much he was willing to risk. Your answer? Everything that other people appreciate. I would die on Mars. If my wife and I had a lot of children, she would probably stay with them on Earth. "

Seeing Elon in this light connects many points. The goal of the video game he created as a child was to save the world from an alien space freighter. At university, he wrote articles detailing his sustainable energy plans to ensure that "civilization can continue to progress." Even the founding of all his businesses was not driven by profit motives, but was working to create a system of interconnected companies that can help our species in both the short and long term.

So with this universal understanding of Musk, where does that leave us with our initial question?

It leads me to conclude that Elon cares about one thing above all else: saving our species. He cares so much about this that it doesn't matter if people think he's an idiot. For him, the common good is more important than the feelings of an individual (even those of his family). So at the end of the day, I have to say that Elon Musk is a jerk, but he's also an innovative jerk that we should aspire to be.

Look at it this way

Elon Musk is 43 years old, 46 years old (2001) Steve Jobs was still busy trying to get Apple Computer (then it was Apple Computer and not Apple Inc.) out of the mess he was in. At that time not many had predicted that it would be. changing the world the way it did (creating a dent in the universe) by launching the iPod and then the break is history.

Getting to the point here, in 2001, when I was 43 years old and Apple Computer had released the iPod. Steve Jobs didn't have the typical showman release for iPod that he had for iPhone and iPad, people weren't lining up outside stores to buy a music player, which

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Look at it this way

Elon Musk is 43 years old, 46 years old (2001) Steve Jobs was still busy trying to get Apple Computer (then it was Apple Computer and not Apple Inc.) out of the mess he was in. At that time not many had predicted that it would be. changing the world the way it did (creating a dent in the universe) by launching the iPod and then the break is history.

Getting to the point here, in 2001, when I was 43 years old and Apple Computer had released the iPod. Steve Jobs didn't have the typical release of a showman for iPod that he had for iPhone and iPad, people did not line up outside stores to buy a music player, which was expensive and only supported Mac OS (in 2001 Mac OS had a relatively small number of user footprint, which you have today), but things changed as Jobs and Apple Computer evolved, the sale of iPods rebounded after 2004 and since then it has been a completely different story, Jobs from then on it was seen as the definition of resilience, it was a family story.

An unwanted child, poor parents, prodigy, college dropout, hippie, spiritual, maverick, entrepreneur, millionaire, getting fired from his own company, coming back, facing rivals, changing the world, battling cancer and finally an untimely death . . He was more than an entrepreneur, a technologist or a leader, it was a story that everyone wanted to hear and tell. I feel that his aura and followers should be attributed more to his life and his story than to the excellence he showed in what he did.

Elon Musk, on the other hand, at 43 is chasing his dreams, inventing and innovating (I feel like people tend to use the word innovation very loosely sometimes) things, people like him not because of his life story ( he has also had drama in life). ) but your dreams (intention), if successful, we can surely say that it will add a few more years to human existence, but only time can tell how far it can take you from here, you have a lot of work ahead of you, and it is definitely not that popular like Steve Jobs, but things are never constant.

A big difference between the two:

Jobs gave the world what it wanted, while Musk wants to give the world what it needs.

They are both unmatched, but I hope Musk gets over it, the word really needs it.

Moritz Von Contain nailed it, especially with Bill Gates.

I previously answered a similar question here and wanted to get a little out of it:

JoEl Meeks-Matous's answer to How can I be as successful as Elon Musk or Mark Zuckerberg starting out as a teenager?

Basically, Gates and Musk ... and Zuck ... and Bezos, along with everyone else we idolized in the Startup Universe dominated the elementary school experience as they were all freshmen, summa-cum laude, or they simply knew more than everyone, teachers and students. combined body. They would treat high school like it was a business and be ready for Monopoli

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Moritz Von Contain nailed it, especially with Bill Gates.

I previously answered a similar question here and wanted to get a little out of it:

JoEl Meeks-Matous's answer to How can I be as successful as Elon Musk or Mark Zuckerberg starting out as a teenager?

Basically, Gates and Musk ... and Zuck ... and Bezos, along with everyone else we idolized in the Startup Universe dominated the elementary school experience as they were all freshmen, summa-cum laude, or they simply knew more than everyone, teachers and students. combined body. They would treat high school like it was a business and were ready to Monopolize… while sometimes they already had a business….

The two facts about Elon that I wanted to highlight from my last answer:

  1. Blastar's International Video Game Sale: The First Flappy Bird

Elon only received $ 500.00 USD for the source code of his video game, but it was published and shared globally through PC Magazine ... in 1984, when Elon is 12 years old. This idea of ​​sharing something useful is where the magic happens ... because today, Tesla patents are shared at zero cost among automotive competitors ... and they are THRIVING for it, as Mercedes borrowed the powertrain system, Daimler / Chrysler uses the batteries and Toyota essentially copied most of the engine.

2. Using First Principles: These are tough questions, not correct answers.

Elon's fascination with the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is where he learned that perspective is EVERYTHING, starting with the questions. If you get that, the rest is easier. You have been building a tree of knowledge that bears fruit to change the future of humanity. (That is, a First principle of energy, it cannot be created or destroyed. The branches of this "trunk" include only efficient forms of energy and consumption, being solar and electricity, in the leaves we find IP and in the fruit we find Tesla and Solar City, even Space-X).

Thank you for reading :)

Let's take a look at both lives first:

Steve Jobs: Let's take a look at work life.

Steve Jobs was the adopted child of Paul and Lara Jobs. When he was at Reed College to graduate, he dropped out of college due to financial trouble instead of taking a design course. He first worked at Atari as a game designer, then he founded Apple with the help of Steve Wozanik, after a few years the board of directors fired him from the company he founded, after that he did not give up and started the new technology company NeXt and Pixar Animation Studio. In 1997, when Apple was on the verge of bankruptcy, Apple

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Let's take a look at both lives first:

Steve Jobs: Let's take a look at work life.

Steve Jobs was the adopted child of Paul and Lara Jobs. When he was at Reed College to graduate, he dropped out of college due to financial trouble instead of taking a design course. He first worked at Atari as a game designer, then he founded Apple with the help of Steve Wozanik, after a few years the board of directors fired him from the company he founded, after that he did not give up and started the new technology company NeXt and Pixar Animation Studio. In 1997, when Apple was on the verge of bankruptcy, Apple bought NeXt and Steve Jobs came to Apple. At the time, he had taken $ 1 as an annual salary as CEO of Apple and introduced the world to new technologies like iPod, iPhone, iPad, Macintosh, etc.

2.Elon Musk:

Elon musk is a fucking genius who had written his first software at the age of 12. He has two degrees, one in physics and the other in economics. He first founded the web software company zip2 corporation, sold it, and became a millionaire at 28. He also co-founded PayPal with Peter Theil. When it made $ 180 million after it existed from Paypl, it invested all that money in spaceX. After the first 3 failures of the spaceX rocket launch, he did not give up and launched the rocket successfully. The answer was "I never give up." Besides spaceX, he also has his electric car company Tesla.

This was all about his life.

Now let's move on to the comparative part, Steve Jobs introduced the world to the iPod, iPhone, iPad and Macintosh, such revolutionary technologies. It was his vision for everyone in this world to have their own computers. And today they all have it. There is no doubt that he changed the world we live in. About elon musk he founded Paypl and made the payment mode easily just by sending you an email. You can pay anyone in the world. Why would someone start a space company for money? It is simple.

Ultimately, the bottom line is that Steve Jobs changed the world. Made it a better place. And Elon Musk is doing the same thing right now - he's trying to make this world a better place. That's what Steve Jobs, Bill Gates have done, that's what Michael Dell, Albert Einstein, Richard Branson, Jeff Bezos have done. They have made this world a better place with their revolutionary ideas and vision and that is what Elon Musk is doing right now. Hope you got the point. It makes no sense to compare these people. Instead of comparing them, it would be better if we learn from them.

Of course, no. The copyright belongs to the person who was the author or the creation of the work. If you write a review, YOU are the copyright holder of what you wrote in that review. What you write (assuming they are entirely your words) is entirely your creative work and has your own copyright, completely unrelated to the copyright of the author of the book.

Now, if you end up using quotes or images from that book in your review to illustrate, explain or give examples as an integral part of your criticism and / or comments in the review, that use is one of the reasons why the rights law author in the United States was d

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Of course, no. The copyright belongs to the person who was the author or the creation of the work. If you write a review, YOU are the copyright holder of what you wrote in that review. What you write (assuming they are entirely your words) is entirely your creative work and has your own copyright, completely unrelated to the copyright of the author of the book.

Now, if you end up using quotes or images from that book in your review to illustrate, explain or give examples as an integral part of your criticism and / or comments in the review, that use is one of the reasons why the rights law Author's practice in the US was developed first: to provide a means for authors and inventors to benefit from their works, while facilitating criticism and comment to advance the advancement of science and learning. discovery. 1

Therefore, copyright law in the US specifically and explicitly encourages criticism and comment, and reviewing a book would be a perfect example of that encouraged use.

Footnotes

1 US Copyright Office - Copyright Law: Preface

I think I share your feeling. I'm a huge fan of both, but I have to say that I've recently become a much bigger fan of Elon Musk compared to Steve Jobs. (Again, this is my personal opinion, and I am writing this to help you put things in perspective) Let's
first look at the similarities between the two:
Visionaries:
There is no denying the fact that they are / were both visionaries. They dreamed of the future and made their way to it.
Perfectionist:
Once again, a common attribute between the two.
Motivators:
Both managed to reach teams / companies motivated far beyond the others to achieve perfection to meet the

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I think I share your feeling. I'm a huge fan of both, but I have to say that I've recently become a much bigger fan of Elon Musk compared to Steve Jobs. (Again, this is my personal opinion, and I am writing this to help you put things in perspective) Let's
first look at the similarities between the two:
Visionaries:
There is no denying the fact that they are / were both visionaries. They dreamed of the future and made their way to it.
Perfectionist:
Once again, a common attribute between the two.
Motivators:
Both managed to reach their teams / companies motivated much more than anyone else to achieve perfection to fulfill the vision.
Love of technology
and others.

Now, let's look at the differences between the two:
Vision:
Steve Jobs' vision for the future was more geared towards creating cooler, easier-to-use things and tools that will help people progress. This was all wrapped up around the bigger goal of making a profit (by the way, I have nothing against making a profit). Now contrast that with Elon's Vision: solving the greatest problems in the humanities: sustainable energy, sustainable transportation, and the ultimate survival of the human race. Elon looked at various industries that would affect humanity the most in the future and tried to make a contribution.
Motivation:
After PayPal, you could easily have started other successful Internet companies and maximized your return on investment, but that's never been your motive. Before starting SpaceX, I was considering doing a philanthropic mission to Mars just to get people excited about Space again. He was willing to spend half of his PayPal earnings on this.
Engineer vs. Manager
Elon is a hard core engineer rather than a Manager. He's the CEO and CTO of SpaceX! CEO and CPA (Chief Product Architect) of Tesla. You don't just push your team, you also push yourself as an innovator. Working 100 hours a little when you could be buying islands is not an easy thing to do. He really designs rockets!
This is also reflected in the way two spoke / spoke. Elon doesn't have the presentation skills like Jobs, but he speaks pragmatically exposing the facts, possibilities, strategies, vision, and issues. He just doesn't sugarcoat. He says something in the investors' meeting that 'We are going to try, I don't know if we will succeed or not, but we will try'.
Closed loop vs. open loop
Tesla and SpaceX both visions involve motivating other companies to follow suit and move toward solving the bigger problem rather than capturing the market. For example, at the Tesla shareholders meeting: (can't remember the exact words)
Elon "Tesla's goal was to show that it can be done and hope that others will follow, but somehow others have not."
Someone in the crowd "Good !!"
Elon "I'd rather have competition than not, Tesla alone can't make transportation sustainable"
Tesla also provides technology solutions to other companies to help develop electric cars.

I hope this helps!
P.S. I will try to shorten the answer! :P

Yes and no.

Musk cares about style and design:

However, Elon Musk likely views many of Job's accomplishments as trivial compared to his own goals. Apple didn't find the world's biggest neglected problems and tried to solve them. Apple did not ask, if there was a single page written about the more than 3 billion years of life history that contains only the most important elements, what can I do that is worthy of positive mention on this page? (make life multiplanetary). Apple did not try to make the world more sustainable. Apple competed in a crowded market - smartphones were starting to happen. Alrea MP3 players

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Yes and no.

Musk cares about style and design:

However, Elon Musk likely views many of Job's accomplishments as trivial compared to his own goals. Apple didn't find the world's biggest neglected problems and tried to solve them. Apple did not ask, if there was a single page written about the more than 3 billion years of life history that contains only the most important elements, what can I do that is worthy of positive mention on this page? (make life multiplanetary). Apple did not try to make the world more sustainable. Apple competed in a crowded market - smartphones were starting to happen. MP3 players already existed. Computers (except Apple 2) were going to be so quickly plentiful and useful with or without Apple's contribution. I may have sped things up a few years

So Apple makes incremental improvements in computer technology in a crowded field by making incremental improvements in computer technology. In many ways, their products have been less useful (though more reliable) than Windows computers because closed architecture and form factors are prioritized over functionality. It is also very expensive. And Apple is best known for its style.

But they were very good at what they did. That is why they were so successful. Elon wants to emulate his competition, if not the comparatively pedestrian nature of his goals. If Tesla wants to be successful in creating stylish products, learning from Apple makes good sense. People care about style, people care about experience, people care about fun. If your world- or age-changing ideas come with Apple-style design, they will be adopted more quickly.

Musk's presentations at product launches are reminiscent of Steve Job's. Like Jobs, he is passionate about design. Even Musk's factories look like a work of art: bright white floors, consistent color schemes, and well-organized.

Its cars and spaceships have iPad-influenced touchscreen interfaces. Elegant curves. Elegant shapes. Focus on improving the user experience in a practical and superficial way.

I agree with Richard's answer and would like to add that there is also an ethical problem. The author of the book invested time and energy in creating the right kind of structure and the right kind of examples for the student to follow easily. This is not a trivial task and you can be sure that the author did not sit down, write the book cover to cover, and then left it at that. A lot of work went into editing, rearranging the text, and "getting it right."

If you took this structure and the same examples, made a course from it, and put it online, then it doesn't matter if it was put into practice or not.

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I agree with Richard's answer and would like to add that there is also an ethical problem. The author of the book invested time and energy in creating the right kind of structure and the right kind of examples for the student to follow easily. This is not a trivial task and you can be sure that the author did not sit down, write the book cover to cover, and then left it at that. A lot of work went into editing, rearranging the text, and "getting it right."

If you take this structure and the same examples, build a course from it, and put it online, then it doesn't matter if you got into legal trouble or not, it would be unethical.

If you create a course based on your knowledge and create your own course structure, your own examples, and your own way of explaining things, it will be a different story. I suggest that you read more books first, because if your only reference is a book, you will have a natural tendency to gravitate towards the content of that book.

If you need to copy the content of a book directly, please provide a correct citation. However, you cannot do this with a full course.

It is not forbidden to take knowledge from various sources and combine it to create something new; in fact, this is how teaching (and science) works. Taking knowledge from a source and presenting it as your own work is a problem.

I think the dispute between Steve and Musk goes back to this party.

Let's take a look at two recent examples.

  1. Elon Musk called Apple the graveyard of Tesla employees, as Apple tends to hire them.
  2. Musk also said that Tesla will be worth 3 times more than Apple by 2030.

But why is he so against Apple? In fact, you don't even use an iPhone or Macbook.

I don't think Elon Musk is one to be hurt by a personal insult. Steve Jobs was a very important person and if he didn't treat Musk as an equal, Musk wouldn't care too much.

I think the real problem is that Jobs insulted his vision or did not believe.

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I think the dispute between Steve and Musk goes back to this party.

Let's take a look at two recent examples.

  1. Elon Musk called Apple the graveyard of Tesla employees, as Apple tends to hire them.
  2. Musk also said that Tesla will be worth 3 times more than Apple by 2030.

But why is he so against Apple? In fact, you don't even use an iPhone or Macbook.

I don't think Elon Musk is one to be hurt by a personal insult. Steve Jobs was a very important person and if he didn't treat Musk as an equal, Musk wouldn't care too much.

I think the real problem is that Jobs insulted his vision or did not believe in it. Perhaps, he laughed at what Elon Musk was trying to accomplish. After all, going to Mars seems crazy even in 2016.

Now, we'll never know what really happened at the party, but if Steve Jobs, the "visionary," had no faith in Musk's plans ... then he must have struck a deep blow.

Something that is evident to this day.

Health!

Yes and no; From what I can see in the news and biographies, Musk appears to be as motivated as Jobs, and with a similar level of intolerance of stupidity and / or lack of commitment. He doesn't seem to share the ingenious use of verbal abuse and defiance as a tool to get more out of people, as Jobs did; If Musk thinks you're not doing your best, he'll just ditch you and find a replacement. In any case, I'd say your empathy compass is equally damaged. But I guess you can't go and kick Universe's butt unless you have that very special kind of "whatever it takes" attitude ...

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