Did anyone quit their job the first day?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Kyle Harper



Did anyone quit their job the first day?

Yes. Yes, I do.

The most disappointing thing was that I went through such an extensive process to get hired. But it was literally a fight at the end of my shift. In my first day.

My cousin drove Lyft. I accompanied her on this particular day, just for security reasons. It was a very busy festival weekend, which was great in terms of demand, but can of course be a bit hectic.
We started relatively earlier in the afternoon, like 2-3pm, and picked up a middle-aged man, who seemed defeated and tired, but also very polite. We talked to him and started to tell him how we were

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Yes. Yes, I do.

The most disappointing thing was that I went through such an extensive process to get hired. But it was literally a fight at the end of my shift. In my first day.

My cousin drove Lyft. I accompanied her on this particular day, just for security reasons. It was a very busy festival weekend, which was great in terms of demand, but can of course be a bit hectic.
We started relatively earlier in the afternoon, like 2-3pm, and picked up a middle-aged man, who seemed defeated and tired, but also very polite. We chatted with him and began to tell him that we just “got by” and that we are having a hard time finding a job where we wanted to stay long term.
He began to explain how he works overnight in a laboratory and that they were urgently hiring sample processors. The pay sounded great. The hours seemed doable. It all sounded tempting.
We exchanged information and, being the one without a job, I seized the opportunity more heavily than my cousin. We stayed in touch and he walked me through the hiring process and final hiring on the premises. Really nice guy. Super grateful for your help.

The first day, or night, I must say, I arrived ready for work at 11pm. Completely disorganized. My hiring manager showed up 3 hours later than I was told to come in. Mind you, this is an overnight job. So by 2am, most, if not all, of my friends are sleeping, at their own jobs or possibly away from home. So I sat in my car and basically found something to entertain me for 3 hours because I think dropping out on the first day was unprofessional. I also thought falling asleep and SLEEPING SLEEP in the parking lot at my new job was even worse. It is no worse than my own manager coming to work 3 hours LATE.

By the time she shows up, I'm very disinterested and really very tired / ready to go. And of course, being a new hire, you must complete computer science training before advancing to my current department. I pushed the continuous yawns that pulsed through my body every 17 seconds. I did that for about 2 hours and surprisingly I was able to finish in the right time and I still have time in my shift to follow other employees and jump right in. Excited. Hurrah. Not until I felt the change literally DRAG. BY. and my manager is nowhere to be found. No instructions should be given. Without proper training. I'm just wandering aimlessly and moving things as I watch ... And everyone worked in complete silence.
So quiet that you could hear someone blink. Literally the perfect place to fall asleep. But it was very unsettling how quiet it was. Open floor plan, more than 30 employees, total silence. Something just felt uncomfortable. Not a peep from me. He simply joined in the silence and continued to push through this already horrendous change.

They arrive at 7:30 am, which was supposed to be the end of the shift. No administrator found. And I'm checked and pissed off at this point, because that leaves me with no instructions and, furthermore, no clearance to leave and no follow-up for the rest of when my training should take place. Here I am, sitting alone thinking and eventually getting more enraged (laughs). A little conversation breaks out, and I guess it's because we're leaving soon; everyone is out of work mode. Incorrect.
8 o'clock in the morning begins to approach. Everyone is packing their things and the noise level of the environment rises completely. Again, I still think this is just the light at the end of the tunnel and we are good to go. Wrong one more time. My manager finally shows up, makes everyone stay where they are, and calls a "department meeting." Who calls a department meeting at the end of the work shift ???? Are we getting paid for this?

The manager stands in front of us, rolls her eyes in an annoyed way, and sighs deeply. Seconds later, after his dramatic pause, he begins to address a list of "concerns," discrepancies between staff production, and behavior issues that he noticed during the shift on a piece of paper. Here I am completely surprised that this was not something handled by HR, but rather abruptly in our workspaces… .. at the end of the work shift…. And also since this was my first day, I didn't know anything about what was going on or a single name that I recognized.

A great ruckus breaks out. My classmates started to face each other and it got really loud and agitated. Very abrasive behavior and the same guy who helped get me hired was participating in it. Then it turned into a physical altercation that the manager, along with 2 others intervened to extinguish. So much drama and so much revealed about that place and I only worked there for 7 hours. Imagine that. It was so unprofessional, ghetto, and downright disqualifying. No one would feel comfortable working in an area with such stress; You could literally cut it with a steak knife.

After all that said and done, my manager came up to me and said, "Sorry * giggles * please come back tomorrow." And guess who definitely didn't show up tomorrow? You guessed it. I.

Yes. I started working in a warehouse and during my first and only shift, I found that some of the people who worked there were quite rude, the managers / supervisors treated their colleagues like zoo animals, the team was not very welcoming to me and he work was very repetitive and boring.

When I got there I called my supervisor who seemed like a decent guy and told him that I had gotten where I needed to be and he came out and looked for me. Then he took me inside and made me wait in the staff room for about 30 minutes before going to the main warehouse while he was gossiping with the other colleague.

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Yes. I started working in a warehouse and during my first and only shift, I found that some of the people who worked there were quite rude, the managers / supervisors treated their colleagues like zoo animals, the team was not very welcoming to me and he work was very repetitive and boring.

When I got there I called my supervisor who seemed like a decent guy and told him that I had gotten where I needed to be and he came out and looked for me. He then took me inside and made me wait in the staff room for about 30 minutes before going to the main warehouse while he was gossiping with the other co-workers without making an effort to get to know me at first, as well as ignoring social distancing regulations. . I understand that they are busy with other problems and responsibilities, that they only come to that place to work and just want to get through the day, but it would be nice if not necessarily everyone, but more people made an effort to make me feel. welcome as part of the team.

Having said that, I was put to work with a friendly team member who made me feel welcome, was quite funny, friendly and chatty and made sure I was doing everything right. However, despite this, the atmosphere in the place was dull. They set rules such as not being able to use their phones even if you had to wait 30 to 40 minutes for the sheets containing the orders to be collected and you were not allowed to restock the shelves of empty boxes when there were no orders to pick up. I understand that some days are busier than others, but having to wait that long just for an order to print makes it seem pointless to be there along with 20 other staff members. The worst part was that the managers used their phones while berating us for quickly using them to check the time, as for some stupid reason they couldn't afford to have watches on display in what is a huge facility. They also scolded us for not distancing ourselves socially, but they opened up together for the last 15 minutes consistently before the shift ended. Speaking of being treated like zoo animals, at the end of our shift, they made us walk single file like Noah's Ark, but not two by two, more like children before entering a school assembly. This was apparently part of a social distancing practice despite the fact that supervisors force us to wrap ourselves within 2 meters for a meeting before leaving. While going out,

After riding my bike back in the freezing rain and considering it carefully, I decided I didn't want to continue working there and emailed a resignation to my supervisor the next day, to which they didn't even reply (LOL). Although there were some colleagues who made the workplace bearable (i.e. one particular team member liked to play spy, 21 questions and puzzles and other people liked to join in), the boring working conditions, lack of variety in terms of job duties, mostly ignorant co-workers and supervisors who treated staff unfairly like caged monkeys, made me realize that I didn't want to keep doing this job any longer because it didn't make me happy. Am I proud of what I did? Absolutely not! but, Do I feel that I made a decision that was beneficial to my personal well-being? Absolutely! Unless you have absolutely no options (eg.

I hope this helps. I'm not saying that everyone should do the same thing that I did in that situation, but I hope this gives people an idea of ​​what some workplaces can be like and makes them think about their career options / situations.

I've never done this, but, as a boss, people have left after a very short time, so let me give you the boss's perspective.

In some jobs, people are more or less interchangeable. There is not a lot of time or thought invested in hiring them and there is not a lot of training involved if they leave. Losing someone on short notice can affect your schedule, but it's not very difficult to avoid a single absence and find a replacement. These would be the least skilled positions: selling hamburgers, operating a cash register, waiting tables in a low-end restaurant, etc.

However, many jobs require a large investment

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I've never done this, but, as a boss, people have left after a very short time, so let me give you the boss's perspective.

In some jobs, people are more or less interchangeable. There is not a lot of time or thought invested in hiring them and there is not a lot of training involved if they leave. Losing someone on short notice can affect your schedule, but it's not very difficult to avoid a single absence and find a replacement. These would be the least skilled positions: selling hamburgers, operating a cash register, waiting tables in a low-end restaurant, etc.

However, many jobs require a large investment just to find a person to fill a position. Some positions that I have applied for have required 6 months to over a year to go through all these hoops. You have to persuade your organization to publish (or create) the position, there is paperwork to do within your organization, it has to be published for a few weeks or more, and you may have multiple candidates. Then you have to work your way through the resumes, breaking them down to a handful of finalists. Arrange telephone interviews with them and narrow it down to a few whom you will interview. If some live out of town, you may have to pay for travel to be interviewed. And you have to impose yourself on a lot of people to participate in the interview process. By the time you finally make a job offer, you may have invested a few months, often more, in the process, as well as imposing yourself on many others throughout your organization (and maybe even spending a few thousand dollars or so). to find the person you are going to offer a position to. And keep in mind that, throughout this entire process, you are running short of staff because you have an open position.

Once a person accepts a job offer, the position closes and you start preparing for their arrival. You will need to make sure they have a computer, desk, supplies, account on the organization's computer network, etc. You will develop a training program to bring that person up to date, referring them to your organization's orientation program (if one exists), submitting documentation to HR to coordinate their benefits and make sure they get paid, and all the others mundane things necessary to bring them on board. This takes time, maybe not your time (if you're the boss), but it still takes time away from other jobs.

Then the big day arrives and the person shows up for work. And the next day they say “You know, I just got a better offer somewhere else. Bye thanks. "Or" I just don't think this is going to work, I'm quitting. "Now, all the time and effort that went into posting the job, interviewing, and making a job offer has been wasted. Now we have to start and come back. to go through the whole process. And now we have to keep working with a shortage of staff for a few more months. As a boss, it sucks. And at this point, I probably can't call option # 2 of the interviews because I already closed the opening and I got the first choice in our system, not to mention the fact that my choice # 2 will probably have found a new job by then.

No matter how gently expressed it is, there is no way this is going to leave a positive impression. There is no way you can make people think that you are professional, trustworthy, mature, or any other positive attribute. And if one of the reasons you were hired was the result of a friend's recommendation, that friend will also be viewed differently (and not in a good way) for making such a flawed recommendation. The only acceptable way to do this without looking abysmally bad is if there is a genuine and verifiable personal situation that simply makes it impossible for you to keep your job, as if a parent had a serious health problem that requires you to take care of them. them full time (or to move to wherever they live) since you are an only child.

If you are changing your mind about taking a job, for whatever reason, the best time to do so is as soon as possible after accepting it and before the position is officially closed. The longer you wait, especially if you actually show up for work, the worse it will look and the harder it will spawn.

One final thought: In many skilled positions, it can take many months or even a year before a person is trained and experienced enough to start making a positive contribution. It is a great investment for the employer: to be paying your salary and benefits for so long in the hope that you are a good worker. I'm not sure about the others, but I was hoping that people would stick around for a while after they were fully trained. Those who learned what they could and rescued after a year or two were also not well regarded. On the other hand, I know that it is a dynamic work environment and people have to take care of themselves and their career; If someone gives me three years or more of good, solid work, then I'm willing to give them a favorable recommendation.

When I was younger, I started in a restaurant and my first day was a normal first day. Busy, lots of new information to take in, names to remember, bosses to impress. But I also noticed that people didn't pay much attention to me. I was always on the side while my coach socialized, out of sight and out of mind until I asked a question. The managers seemed difficult to read. He seemed to spend a lot of time with the guests, drinking coffee, but occasionally he would hear a cook or a busboy yelling. She was also the daughter of the owners. The rest of the day was confusing. I had no problem

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When I was younger, I started in a restaurant and my first day was a normal first day. Busy, lots of new information to take in, names to remember, bosses to impress. But I also noticed that people didn't pay much attention to me. I was always on the side while my coach socialized, out of sight and out of mind until I asked a question. The managers seemed difficult to read. He seemed to spend a lot of time with the guests, drinking coffee, but occasionally he would hear a cook or a busboy yelling. She was also the daughter of the owners. The rest of the day was confusing. I had no problem working with tables, I grew up working at a resort so I knew how to interact. It was the actual work that was confusing. I felt like we were running in circles constantly. Not because it was busy but because the very layout of the place had waiters crisscrossed throughout a completely open-concept kitchen. The longer the day went by I saw arguments between managers and staff. Finally, the day ended, thinking that I was done with the training (which I was not even paid for) and then I was informed that I had to roll the silverware and napkins into packages. 100 of them. And my coach said she had to do them all, which another staff member later told me was not true and that she was being lazy and responsible for her own. I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. This is why: The longer the day went by I saw arguments between managers and staff. Finally, the day ended, thinking that I was done with the training (which I was not even paid for) and then I was informed that I had to roll the silverware and napkins into packages. 100 of them. And my coach said she had to do them all, which another staff member later told me was not true and that she was being lazy and responsible for her own. I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. Here's why: The more the day went by, I saw arguments between managers and staff. Finally the day ended thinking that I was done with the training (which I was not even paid for) and then I was informed that I had to roll the silverware and napkins into packages. 100 of them. And my coach said she had to do them all, which another staff member later told me was not true and that she was being lazy and responsible for her own. I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. Here's why: And my coach said she had to do them all, which another staff member later told me was not true and that she was being lazy and responsible for her own. I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. Here's why: And my coach said she had to do them all, which another staff member later told me was not true and that she was being lazy and responsible for her own. I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. This is why: I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. This is why: I finished my napkins, thanked everyone and left. I went home knowing that I would not be back the next day. Not because it was overwhelming or confusing, but because they didn't deserve me. This is why:

  1. Training - Management has chosen someone to train it to TEACH how to do the job. The woman who trained me ignored me half the time and had no interest in helping me learn to be successful in my new job. Basically she was horrible. Which made me wonder why she was training, but still the management chose her. Did you want to work in a place where this woman is considered so good that you should train people? Sometimes people just look for a job, do it, and leave. This is not the case with a coach. You can not do that. So yeah, hit one.
  2. flow: whoever came up with the systems and paths in that place was crazy. I guess I would learn it eventually, but based on the grunts and collisions I saw, it seemed like something that would frustrate me.
  3. attitude: the manager hardly spoke to me and when she did she would not look me in the eye. Spent most of my time there with guests. The touches on the table are important, but you can't expect the restaurant to run unmarked. He could have set her shoe on fire and she wouldn't have noticed. Teamwork was lacking. Many hands make work easier and when people collaborate, things get done and situations are handled. The guy who had dropped a tray cleaned up the mess while his co-workers stood and just looked at him. My coach even told me not to bother me when I went to help him. I don't want to work with people like that. I want people to help me as I would help them.
  4. cheated. All of that ultimately sealed the deal. On that first day I identified so many red flags, I knew this place was going to be a nightmare.

I don't want to send an "if you don't like it then just give up and go" message. But I want to say that you must value your worth. I know that I am very good at working with people, I am smart and I move fast. And I deserve to be in a place that has coworkers with those same attributes. I also deserve a safe workplace, both physically and mentally. And you do it. Sometimes you have to hold on and see how it goes, and other times you have to follow your gut and the observations you make that first day. Good luck!!!!

P.S. Oh, I called the next morning and told them it wasn't for me and I wish them luck finding someone compatible. Be respectful, do the right thing, and most importantly, DON'T BURN BRIDGES! You never know when you will meet these people again. (Hopefully never hahaha)

one time.

it was a care assistant job.

I arrived the first day, without training, without presentations, without induction, I just went to one of the rooms and left with the rest of the staff.

The first thing they got me to help lift the older residents and moved me into the living room, it was new, but I had done the work before so it wasn't too bad, if I was new to this then I wouldn't have known what to do, again without training.

We serve breakfast, the staff put the dishes in my hand and barked orders, take this food to Ted, who? I've been here an hour, how am I supposed to know the residents by name?

residents who are in bed

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one time.

it was a care assistant job.

I arrived the first day, without training, without presentations, without induction, I just went to one of the rooms and left with the rest of the staff.

The first thing they got me to help lift the older residents and moved me into the living room, it was new, but I had done the work before so it wasn't too bad, if I was new to this then I wouldn't have known what to do, again without training.

We serve breakfast, the staff put the dishes in my hand and barked orders, take this food to Ted, who? I've been here an hour, how am I supposed to know the residents by name?

Residents who are bedridden, I was expected to bring meals and go to their beds, again they called names at me and I have no idea who these people are. and I had problems with leaving the food, how do we know that they are eating the food or drinking the drink? What if they need help?

then it is about a 5 minute break after breakfast, they told me I am not allowed to sit as it would piss off the manager. At this point the assistant manager comes in and says that I can leave at 2pm instead of 6pm (remember this for later).

I go down to the laundry room, which is in front of the kitchen, they tell me to go get some clothes, I go downstairs and I see that the fire door is being used to dry the clothes. I used to be a health and safety officer in a factory and immediately saw the kitchen, the room most likely to have a fire, versus a room that now has no fire door exit. the red flags begin to sound.

I help a care attendant put a man on the toilet, she leaves him there and tells me to go with her, she stays for more than 30 minutes. red flag again. I don't realize it at first because I was ordered from one care attendant to another. I feel nothing but guilt about this even today.

I go into the lock room to get rid of a used toilet, and just above the machine, where all the bodily fluids are flushed, a first aid kit. swamp health and safety no no. Red flags on the mast full now. contamination of sterilized and emergency equipment

I am going to help with a bath and seek bath aid along with duct tape. I have no idea how it sticks together.

1.55 p. M. a care attendant tells me to leave while the assistant manager holds me down the stairs and the manager asks me what I am doing. the assistant manager looks me dead in the eye and in a high voice, says I never said anything like that. Annnnnnd I'm done.

I walk home frustrated, angry and sad, I come home and actually cry in frustration, after recovering, I call and say I will not return, and then I call another number, social services to report what I saw and experienced, I don't know if closed or changed manager, all I know is people deserve dignity and respect, these people weren't getting that and they were paying for the privilege.

I did it once. I was working as a social worker in crisis situations and a friend contacted me to offer me a social worker position at the prison. I had worked with federal criminals before and I didn't think it would be too difficult for me. I was paying around $ 20,000 a year more than my job at the time, so it was a no-brainer, or so I thought. I interviewed myself, took a psychological test, and got the job.

I worked crisis work 4 days a week, and the prison needed me right away, so I told them that I had to notify, but that I could work the only day of the week that I was free. I started on a Monday.

I informed the prisoner

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I did it once. I was working as a social worker in crisis situations and a friend contacted me to offer me a social worker position at the prison. I had worked with federal criminals before and I didn't think it would be too difficult for me. I was paying around $ 20,000 a year more than my job at the time, so it was a no-brainer, or so I thought. I interviewed myself, took a psychological test, and got the job.

I worked crisis work 4 days a week, and the prison needed me right away, so I told them that I had to notify, but that I could work the only day of the week that I was free. I started on a Monday.

I reported to the prison. I noticed that morale was worse than I expected. No one really spoke to me and I was left alone in an office for a few hours with nothing to do. A guy who worked there came up and said (not in a totally joking way) "Oh, I guess he must have lied well enough to pass the psychological test." A little unpleasant, but I could deal with it. He proceeded to show me the psychiatric area. In one room, a naked man was handcuffed to the bed and was screaming like crazy. The guy said something to the effect that this prisoner was one of the softest; it was "just" psychotic. At this point I was beginning to have great doubts about the job.

The last straw came at lunchtime. Someone told me that I had an hour for lunch and that was it, without suggestions of where to eat people, without invitations, I will only be back in an hour ”. This was before cell phones and I basically got out of prison and drove through a terrible part of town trying to find lunch. I was too nervous to sit in the car and eat, or go to any restaurant, as the area was so run down. I drove, had lunch, and thought about work. He could deal with a bad part of a job, but bad morale, hostile co-workers, and working with psychotic criminals was a little more than he could handle. As I ate, I decided, "I can't go back." And I didn't. I called the next morning and quit.

One time.

I had been hired as a kitchen staff at a local university. While I was briefly trained, towards the end of my shift after dinner (serving thousands of college students) I was told to break the line, that is, take out all the food trays, put them in a cart and take them out of Return. dishwasher, clean and drain hot water into buckets, etc., etc.

So I got down to business pulling out dozens of trays of food that I placed on a cart. I guess I wasn't thinking, but instead of taking out all the pans at once and pushing them back to wash them, I took them out one at a time, cleaned them.

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One time.

I had been hired as a kitchen staff at a local university. While I was briefly trained, towards the end of my shift after dinner (serving thousands of college students) I was told to break the line, that is, take out all the food trays, put them in a cart and take them out of Return. dishwasher, clean and drain hot water into buckets, etc., etc.

So I got down to business pulling out dozens of trays of food that I placed on a cart. I guess I wasn't thinking, but instead of taking out all the pans at once and pushing them back to wash them, I took them out one at a time, cleaned them, and then took out the next one. Remember it was the first time I did this.

So after a while my new boss (a guy named David) comes out to check on me, sees the cart full of food trays, and LOSES HIS MIND.

I mean screaming, turning red in the face. Apparently he thought that all the dishes were washed (as they used to be by then) and they were closing everything and cleaning it. If you don't realize it, turning off and cleaning an industrial dishwasher is a big problem, it takes a long time. Now they had to put everything back together to make the new load of plates work.

He had every reason to be angry, but he was yelling at me, inches from my face, then he violently grabbed the cart from my shaking hands and slammed it against the wall sending dozens of food trays flying all over the place in his rage.

I ran into the dark, empty dining room and sobbed. I was 20 years old, this was only my third job, my first day in said job and I grew up in an abusive home with a father who terrified me by screaming in my face, so you could say I was unchained to the extreme. degree. Even if none of that applies, a grown man yelling at his new hire for an honest mistake and throwing things around creating a huge mess is no way to be a good leader.

I didn't 'quit' because I didn't want to face his anger again, but I never showed up for my second day at work.

Yes, around 1978, after about three hours on my first day as a cook in a little place on Cambridge Street in Boston. I was pulling out a trash barrel and they told me to kick the other barrels before throwing it away. Obediently, I kicked one of the barrels and a gang of big rats scuttled around my feet and I said, "To hell with this," and walked quickly away.

Up the street, they hired me at an Italian deli. Every few days a big Caddy would arrive and the guys in suits would go to the basement and start yelling loud enough to drown out the house music. I always looked around the eating area to gauge the reaction.

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Yes, around 1978, after about three hours on my first day as a cook in a little place on Cambridge Street in Boston. I was pulling out a trash barrel and they told me to kick the other barrels before throwing it away. Obediently, I kicked one of the barrels and a gang of big rats scuttled around my feet and I said, "To hell with this," and walked quickly away.

Up the street, they hired me at an Italian deli. Every few days a big Caddy would arrive and the guys in suits would go to the basement and start yelling loud enough to drown out the house music. I always looked around the dining area to gauge customer reaction. During these visits, many pots and pans were thrown against the basement walls and floor. Then they would go. I know that writers get their material from reality.

Apart from me, the only member not working there was a woman in her twenties who was a confidant of the family and acted as a link between the family and the rest of the world. One day he told me that I had to go, resign, for my own safety, right now, because "I knew too much."

I had no idea what he was talking about, but I knew these people were crazy, so I didn't ask why, I just walked out the door.

About a week later, he showed up at my boarding house door and said that they really wanted to hire me again.

I politely declined. After that, I went corporate. Corporations have their own problems, but at least in those settings you have a better chance of recourse when things veer too far into the fog.

I once had a job at Woolworth's *.

I had just turned 19, had been alone for 3 years, living in Louisiana and Colorado, and it broke my heart for the boy who later became the man who painted George. Emily Fisher's answer to What is your favorite painting and why?

To temporarily avoid the pain of my "real life" and everyone in it, I hitchhiked back to New Jersey from Colorado, penniless, thinking that if I stayed with my mother for a while, I might save some money during my life. escape. But I had left on a whim and hadn't told him I was going.

My last trip had taken me

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I once had a job at Woolworth's *.

I had just turned 19, had been alone for 3 years, living in Louisiana and Colorado, and it broke my heart for the boy who later became the man who painted George. Emily Fisher's answer to What is your favorite painting and why?

To temporarily avoid the pain of my "real life" and everyone in it, I hitchhiked back to New Jersey from Colorado, penniless, thinking that if I stayed with my mother for a while, I might save some money during my life. escape. But I had left on a whim and hadn't told him I was going.

My last trip had taken me to my hometown early in the day, and since I was especially eager to get a job, to distract myself, I headed straight downtown from the road, without stopping at the house or telling my mother I was there. .

I hit the pavement all day, and when I finally made it up the hill to the family home, it was as a Woolworth's clerk, wearing a uniform and a locker key.

The next day, I walked downtown to work, opened my locker, put on my uniform, and went out on the floor.

I had been hired as a sales clerk, and while at one point it may have been a real job, in the summer of 1974 the idea of ​​a saleswoman at Woolworth's was a joke.

By then the malls had taken over and no one was going to Woolworth's. Whichever it was, she certainly didn't need a salesperson to help her pick out dusty bobby pins. It was downright depressing.

Also, he was heartbroken, remember? and that was not something I did halfway; I hadn't been able to stop crying for weeks.

As a result, I spent my entire first day at Woolworth pacing up and down those dusty, desolate corridors, dodging the few people who entered the store. I'd been feeling bad enough without the added factor of hanging out in a dead store that they had forgotten to bury. It wasn't long before she started crying again.

But he was at work! I couldn't cry! No crying at Woolworth's! So I grabbed whatever tattered thing was going on, wiped my eyes and nose, and tried to dry myself off.

No way. My life is over! I was a saleswoman at a withered Woolworth's, for God's sake! And I soon realized that it didn't matter in the least that I was at work; he could cry all he wanted and no one would ever know, because there was not a soul.

All I did throughout the day was walk, sob, and wipe my face with various shirts and dresses. No one ever saw me. He was grateful for that, but it also made it more depressing.

Since I was so screwed up, it never occurred to me until the end of the day when they told me I could go, that this didn't have to be my life, that I could quit, right now!

And that is what I did. At the end of my first day at work, I quit, told them I would never go back. That made me feel better for a minute, but as soon as I walked out the door, I started crying again.

As I walked up the hill in that quiet, tree-laden city, I realized how long he had really been holding me back in the shop. I may have been crying, even though I was far from doing my best. But I did it now. Crawling through the deserted streets, I started to really let go of him, to cry.

I knew my mother would still be at work, so there would be no need to dry off when I got home; on the contrary, it could let it out even more. As I approached the driveway, I let my crescendo grow, eager to get inside and scream like crazy.

But that was not so. Because Mrs. Howell, the woman next door Emily Fisher responded to Who were your childhood neighbors and how did they affect you ?, she was standing at the end of the driveway, calling out to me with her heavy Arkansas accent. " Eyem! Hah, Eyem! He yelled, "Come oh, Eyem, I need to talk to the yew tree!"

These days I would say FUCK THAT! But back then I still must have had a hint of courtesy left. Perhaps I had more respect for the elders before I became one. Or it could have simply been that he was young enough to still think he didn't have much to say about it. Anyway, I felt like I had no choice but to leave.

He took me home, sat me down, and gave me milk and cookies. Understandably, he was in no mood for small talk. But it didn't turn out to be small talk: the milk and cookies were just a buffer, a ruse.

Mrs. Howell made me come there to tell me that she had received a phone call that morning from someone who had reported that CORA BELLE had died in her sleep the night before. Emily Fisher's answer to Who has been the most important person in your life and why?

Cora Belle, the woman who raised me since I was 2 years old, and showed me the only unconditional love of my childhood, the woman who saved me, emotionally, building a dignified self-esteem despite the bullying of my family. .

Cora Belle was the first person I ever loved, and at that time she was still the only person I had ever felt loved, the only adult I had ever trusted. CORA BELLE! Now he really needed to scream! I felt absurd that I had been crying so much from that petty anguish, this was real heartbreak!

But Mrs. Howell wouldn't let me go. She was worried about myself, not realizing that the only way she could help was by freeing me. In those days I never cried in front of anyone, under any circumstances, so I was screwed. It kept barking, barking and it was driving me crazy, starting to drown in my anguish.

When he finally let go of me, I got out of there, ran to my childhood kitchen, where he most reminded me of Cora Belle, and began a new round of screeching, roaring in a way I've never done before.

But after I had been crying all day, having repressed my compound suffering all that hour, with Cora Belle's death being the worst thing that ever happened to me (including the death of my father), well, roaring was not an expression. enough. of my pain.

Besides, the fact that Mrs. Howell was taking me hostage had also made me angry.

Since I was alone at home, I felt free to act as necessary, but I had no idea how to express that kind of pain. So I turned to the movies and did something like never before or after.

I grabbed a plate from the cupboard, let out a great howl, and slammed it into the side of the sink. On the other hand, this time on the ground. And again, against the wall. I screamed, cried, groaned, and smashed those plates, the same plates that Cora Belle had served us on her southern fried chicken, cornbread and black-eyed peas, the best fried chicken in the world.

And just in case, I broke the cup of baby tea in which she had given me my specialty coffee, warm milk with a drop of coffee so it wouldn't be white, so I could join her in the mornings while she drank hers black.

I remember feeling cheated, knowing it wasn't turning out like the movies. I hadn't gone crazy, without realizing what I was doing. This is how I would have liked to feel, like a respite, but actually I forced myself to smash those plates, hoping it would drive me crazy.

But it never did. The world didn't change, I didn't go crazy, Cora Belle was still dead and I was no less enraged.

If it had been the movies, the crush would at least have been unburdened. But no, it was still boiling. The best I could hope for was exhausting myself, and I could do well enough just by crying. There was no point in breaking all the dishes.

When my poor mother came home from work an hour later, she found me passed out on a pile of broken china, my eyes swollen and bloody. The worst day of my life.

And it all started at Woolworth's.

* Shit, I just discovered Woolworth's, the original 5 & Dime, closed in 1997! So many of you don't even know what the heck I'm talking about.

At the time of this story, it was probably as well known as McDonalds.

My same Woolworths, same time

Yes, I once quit a job the first day. I had a week or two of paid orientation, but on the first day on my own, I discovered that the administration of the group homes program for adults with developmental disabilities had lied to me about the hours. While I would have 24-hour on-call responsibility as a registered nurse for group homes, my actual work hours would be Monday through Friday.

On my first day of work, I learned that the weekend nurse was going to be fired (they had just waited for me to complete orientation before firing him) and that I would be working 7 days a week until (YES) they hired another n.

Keep reading

Yes, I once quit a job the first day. I had a week or two of paid orientation, but on the first day on my own, I discovered that the administration of the group homes program for adults with developmental disabilities had lied to me about the hours. While I would have 24-hour on-call responsibility as a registered nurse for group homes, my actual work hours would be Monday through Friday.

On my first day of work, I learned that the weekend nurse was going to be fired (they had just waited for me to complete the orientation before firing him) and that I would be working 7 days a week until (YES) they hired another nurse .

Interestingly, the previous nurse, who actually had a Ph.D. in nursing, had resigned for that very reason - the agency had her working 7 days a week to cover the administration of medications in group homes. I have no idea how the hell they thought they could stick with a newly hired nurse treating me the same way.

I called my supervisor and resigned on the spot. I was offered a case management job in pediatric orthopedics which I declined in favor of the position with adults with developmental disabilities. I called the interviewer for the Peds Ortho position, whom I knew from a previous job, told her what happened, and I was immediately hired for the Peds Ortho position. It turned out that the Peds Ortho doctor really wanted me in the case management position and was unhappy with anyone else he had interviewed. Hurrah! I was very lucky to take a direct step in another job.

I later learned from another former co-worker that the senior manager of the group homes was "an evil man." Once again, I considered myself very lucky.

Almost. I quit smoking on my second day.

I had gotten a job as head of international admissions at the EAE University of Barcelona and I thought very naively that it would be similar to that of a friend of mine who works very happily in admissions at one of the city's universities with much more reputation. However, I quickly realized that "admissions officer" was actually a euphemism for nothing more than a glorified sales rep.

As an international admissions officer, I was asked to call a list of people who had expressed interest in any of the pseudo-college programs requesting information about

Keep reading

Almost. I quit smoking on my second day.

I had gotten a job as head of international admissions at the EAE University of Barcelona and I thought very naively that it would be similar to that of a friend of mine who works very happily in admissions at one of the city's universities with much more reputation. However, I quickly realized that "admissions officer" was actually a euphemism for nothing more than a glorified sales rep.

As an international admissions officer, I was asked to call a list of people who had expressed interest in any of the pseudo-college programs requesting information online and trying to convince them to sign up. Basically, you were supposed to let these potential students think they were applying to a good college when in reality pretty much anyone who made a down payment (and I mean ANYONE) would have been accepted. I would have to tell them that I thought they were amazing candidates, regardless of their actual qualifications, and that I would enthusiastically defend their application in front of an admissions panel. There was no admissions panel. When I found out about this, they told me that my colleagues and I had to "filter" some of the candidates,

To make matters worse, these students were foreigners, primarily from Latin America, meaning they came from afar and often took out large loans to study at what they were led to believe was an incredibly prestigious and rigorous Spanish university. I was also surprised to find that many of my fellow admissions officers had also been students there; I would never want to work for my old university if I later found out that I had been tricked into studying there in the first place! And that's why I knew I would never be happy or comfortable working there and I quit on my second day.

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