Did anyone go to coding boot camp hoping to get a job and NOT get it? Or do you know someone who didn't get a job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Hendrix Maldonado



Did anyone go to coding boot camp hoping to get a job and NOT get it? Or do you know someone who didn't get a job?

I have not personally attended coding boot camps, but I have heard stories from the recruitment side. Today's technology climate is a seller's market, as there is a high demand for competent software engineers, but a shortage of supply. For these reasons, companies looking for entry-level programmers hire in boot camps. However, I have also heard that many times these new hires do not work and are laid off after a short period of employment. They simply lack the fundamentals, which take time to internalize. For example, a physicist can throw you the theory of general relativity in less than 2 minutes.

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I have not personally attended coding boot camps, but I have heard stories from the recruitment side. Today's technology climate is a seller's market, as there is a high demand for competent software engineers, but a shortage of supply. For these reasons, companies looking for entry-level programmers hire in boot camps. However, I have also heard that many times these new hires do not work and are laid off after a short period of employment. They simply lack the fundamentals, which take time to internalize. For example, a physicist can throw you the theory of general relativity in less than 2 minutes, but it will probably take longer to * learn *.

Some people say that you need to have started writing compilers at age 14 to become a good programmer. Others claim that a few months of intense training can help you internalize a trade that requires most people to understand it for at least a few years. The truth probably lies somewhere in between, and is also affected by your own initiative, drive, and willingness to work twice as hard as your peers to catch up.

You shouldn't get into programming simply because it's an attractive career and it pays well. I'm not saying this in a derogatory way, rather, unless you enjoy programming and troubleshooting, you probably won't become a professional-quality programmer, especially since it's a fast-moving industry with a penchant for age discrimination. . Successful programmers generally have side projects going on and spend their free time learning new technologies.

My advice to you is this. Don't quit your job and pay high tuition right now, that's too risky. Take 3-6 months and take some introductory courses online. 1 to 2 hours a night and a few more on weekends. There are many free courses available. These courses typically have thousands of enrollments, but a very low completion rate. The reason is that everyone "wants to learn to code", but few want it enough or find it interesting enough to really dedicate themselves to it. Show yourself that you can learn the basics of programming, data structures, and basic algorithms like arrays, classification, string manipulation, etc. Show yourself that you can move on and that you really like these things. Build a small project or two. And if, after all that, you've found that you're still fascinated by it, it might be time to join a boot camp to start your new career.

Obviously, there is a risk of not getting a job. There are college graduates with computer science degrees who don't get a job, and there's no reason to assume that bootcamps would be any different. I've never attended one (I went to college to get a degree), but I know a lot of developers who came from boot camps. Since I meet many of them through work, job connections, and other professional settings, the ones I do meet tend to be more biased towards the category of 'having a job' rather than not being able to find one. That said, almost everyone will tell you that they know multiple

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Obviously, there is a risk of not getting a job. There are college graduates with computer science degrees who don't get a job, and there's no reason to assume that bootcamps would be any different. I've never attended one (I went to college to get a degree), but I know a lot of developers who came from boot camps. Since I meet many of them through work, job connections, and other professional settings, the ones I do meet tend to be more biased towards the category of 'having a job' rather than not being able to find one. That said, almost everyone will tell you that they know several people in their class who never found work. There are several variables at play here.

  1. First of all, how hard are you willing to work? As attractive as the field of 'programming' is now, you're not guaranteed a job simply because you have a nifty little certificate from X bootcamp that says you essentially paid your tuition on time and didn't fail. There is a HUGE deviation between the top students in a bootcamp class and the bottom quadrant, and I can say that NONE of the bootcamp graduates I know or have worked with said anything other than "I graduated top of my class" . Sound like an exaggeration? Consider this, many bootcamps have very low registration requirements and even lower standards when it comes to completing the program. Those who get it right end up learning a TON of practical knowledge and skills for the job, while those who feed on the bottom learn next to nothing at all. I've heard stories from recent code camp graduate recruiters who, by the end of the course, were still unable to write a for loop correctly in Javascript. A year ago, I volunteered to give advice to some local bootcamp students for their culminating projects. The groups were 3 to 5 people, and it was very evident that in almost all the groups (in total, I spent some time with around 10), there were 1 or 2 students doing 90% of the work and the other 1 to 3 it basically existed to push confirmations that consisted of comments and nothing else so they wouldn't get kicked out of the show. Got damn, Search some of the bootcamp project repositories (search by repository for the keywords 'bootcamp' or 'capstone' on Github and you'll find a ton) and tell me you don't see the same trend. Which student you will be is completely up to you.
  2. The next variable is the bootcamp itself. I know of camps that last 4 months and require what is essentially a full-time commitment, that is, 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. I know of others that are substantially cheaper and only ask you to sit in class 3 hours a day, 3 days a week for 5-6 weeks. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but most of the graduates of the shorter programs cannot find work. Look, if it were possible to train people with no programming experience to be competent enough to start a career in the field in a matter of ~ 50 hours of practice, I would quit my computer science degree and immediately quit my very lucrative job to start . my own 'bootcamp tutoring service' and I only ask for 10% of my student's first year wages. If 50 hours were all it took, you would easily make a million in a year. Understand that many LONGER camp graduates still have to take months of their personal time AFTER graduation to produce some impressive personal projects to entice employers to look to them. Be aware of this fact, since you are considering leaving your job for an unspecified period of time, be careful that this "period of time" may be longer than the duration of the camp itself. In fact, it often is. Understand that many LONGER camp graduates still have to take months of their personal time AFTER graduation to produce some impressive personal projects to entice employers to look to them. Be aware of this fact, since you are considering leaving your job for an unspecified period of time, be careful that this "period of time" may be longer than the duration of the camp itself. In fact, it often is. Understand that many LONGER camp graduates still have to take months of their personal time AFTER graduation to produce some impressive personal projects to entice employers to look to them. Be aware of this fact, since you are considering leaving your job for an unspecified period of time, be careful that this "period of time" may be longer than the duration of the camp itself. In fact, it often is.
  3. Last but not least, have realistic expectations. I have NOTHING against bootcamps, but I absolutely HATE the way some of them are marketed (especially on Quora). You hear a bunch of misleading statistics all the time from boot camp accomplices claiming ridiculous job placement rates and ridiculous salaries. I recently came across a site that was claiming ~ 85k average starting salary for its graduates ... sounds great right? Further investigation revealed that the 85k mark came ONLY from a particular graduating class from a particular location (Bay Area cough) where anything under 6 figures would seem underpaid to a developer. I'm in Chicago, you won't get 85k with a bootcamp certificate. Period. In fact, I don't know of any bootcampers who have earned more than 65k starting in this area unless they had some prior programming experience or other very similar skill that translated into value to a company. You may hear that 95% of graduates have found a job! Did you know that many programs have agreements with local companies to hire their graduates who cannot find obscenely low-paying jobs? She had a friend who graduated in the middle of her class and couldn't find a job. Turns out, earning 40k a year to work with Excel and maybe writing the occasional python script wasn't her ideal job, but it was the only one that offered her the bootcamp, aka the one they said would help her get her ready when they advertised a lot. the camp.

I know a couple of people like that. I took some time to ask them about their job search experiences and drew similar conclusions from them - they all thought job search would be easier than what their programs told them.

One of them specifically mentioned that because they never cared during the show unlike some of their peers, they simply assumed that job hunting would not be a problem.

Like college, no program can guarantee you a job. If they do, I would take a very careful look at what exactly they offer.

But here's the important part: you are in charge of your own destiny here! There'

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I know a couple of people like that. I took some time to ask them about their job search experiences and drew similar conclusions from them - they all thought job search would be easier than what their programs told them.

One of them specifically mentioned that because they never cared during the show unlike some of their peers, they simply assumed that job hunting would not be a problem.

Like college, no program can guarantee you a job. If they do, I would take a very careful look at what exactly they offer.

But here's the important part: you are in charge of your own destiny here! There are factors in your job search that you cannot change: the culture of the company / hiring, any discrimination (both intentional and unintentional), the culture fits on the employers' side, etc. This is why you need to maximize the things you can change:

  • The number of companies to which you apply
  • Your cover letter
  • The way your resume flows
  • How you introduce yourself and introduce yourself to each interviewer
  • Preparation for technical interviews: mastering the algorithms, explaining your thought process during each request
  • Playing the game of wages and negotiations
  • Projecting the Right Amount of Confidence
  • Having prepared answers for standard questions, you will be asked
  • Be able to explain everything you have listed on your resume

I personally know people who complete Hack Reactor and they are not as prepared as they should be. I also personally know computer science graduates who don't have enough self-esteem to apply for anything other than internships, convincing themselves that they need to "start at the bottom." Confidence in job search is a state of mind. Regardless of where you get your code writing education, the right attitude will do wonders.

Dozens, if not hundreds, have gone to coding camps and haven't been able to get a coding job in 6 months. For example, check out the reviews on a site like Dev Bootcamp Reviews | Course report

In general, I find that people need about 1,000 hours of programming practice before they can land a software job. Intense programs like App Academy do this by putting their students through 12 80-hour weeks. In contrast, many less intense bootcamps tend to give their students a more enjoyable experience, but those students have a harder time finding a job as a result.

A good rule of thumb is: if the coding field was easy, finding a job afterward is difficult, and vice versa. Although, of course, that's assuming everything else is the same.

The point is that the programming itself is quite difficult to do correctly. And one course will not teach you everything you need to know. Only experience does that. And the only way to get that experience is through practice (either on your own or preferably at work). So the more practice you take a course, the more likely you are to end up with good prospects. The more you add the more practice throughout a

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A good rule of thumb is: if the coding field was easy, finding a job afterward is difficult, and vice versa. Although, of course, that's assuming everything else is the same.

The point is that the programming itself is quite difficult to do correctly. And one course will not teach you everything you need to know. Only experience does that. And the only way to get that experience is through practice (either on your own or preferably at work). So the more practice you take a course, the more likely you are to end up with good prospects. The more you add additional practice to the course, the better. And the more you can practice exactly on the type of programming performed on the prospective job, the better.

There is a common axiom that you need 1000 hours of coding before you are a "proper" programmer; not a bad estimate, but don't take it too literally. All it really says is that practice is of the utmost importance, learning to program without enough practice is silly.

Definitions of the placement rate and characteristics of those who succeed

Placement rate calculations
As of now, there is no standardized calculation for placement rates between bootcamps (we will do our best to assist the consumer in this over the next several months). At Launch Academy, our placement rate is calculated as job applicants who obtain paid positions with companies within 180 days of graduation, where `` job applicants '' are defined as graduates who actively communicate with our Director of Talent, attend scheduled interviews and / or participate in any of the various career services

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Definitions of the placement rate and characteristics of those who succeed

Placement rate calculations
As of now, there is no standardized calculation for placement rates between bootcamps (we will do our best to assist the consumer in this over the next several months). At Launch Academy, our placement rate is calculated as job applicants who obtain paid positions with companies within 180 days of graduation, where `` job applicants '' are defined as graduates who actively communicate with our Director Talent, attend scheduled interviews and / or participate in any of the various career service resources we offer during the graduate support stage of the program.


Why are some people placed and not others (even a minority)?

The boot camp industry as a whole has not collectively defined what constitutes an active job seeker and a reasonable placement schedule. If someone finds a job a year later, does that count? Probably not, but at the other end of the spectrum, a month would be a very short time simply because recruitment companies often don't move that fast. Generally, people are placed because they have developed the skills and fit into recruitment companies, so it might be better to talk about the reasons why someone is not being hired.

Legitimate reasons why someone doesn't get a job after a bootcamp:

  • Not everyone looks for a full-time job afterward. Some entrepreneurs are investing in their skills so they can create their own products instead of paying developers.
  • They already have a job and don't look for a new one later. Sometimes companies will pay their employees to attend boot camp to quickly acquire a skill they need.
  • College breakers - Extremely ambitious college students returning to campus after bootcamp.
  • Personality Issues - Sometimes people get in their way and exhibit non-work-related reasons why you wouldn't want to hire them. Attitude, poor hygiene (yes, really), communication styles, etc.
  • Scouts - Skillful enough to get into a camp and do well, but not job oriented. This is actually a source of great debate within bootcamps because everyone who is motivated and curious deserves a chance, but accepting these people can lower placement rates.
  • Hassle-free performance - They beat the show, but they don't excel. They come to race day with an unexciting final project and demonstrate below-average enthusiasm and exploration of the material.
  • Find out that they don't want to be programmers. After 10-15 weeks of intense coding and being surrounded by developers, some people decide that this is not life for them. So either they go back to what they were doing before or they go in a new direction.


If you filter out all the people who don't fit into one of those categories, you're left with a small handful of people for whom bootcamps weren't the best option to start with. We assign a fairly intense pre-learning curriculum, titled Ignition, to all of our prospective students before they arrive and check their progress on a regular basis while mentoring them along the way. In our experience, people who did not complete previous work tend not to thrive on the week 1 program and beyond.

What skills did those placed during the program gain that attracted hiring companies to hire them?

There's already a good set of answers on Quora about technical skills a bootcamp should help you develop, so I'll highlight the soft skills employers often look for. Recruiting companies are looking for more than just coding skills. Recruitment companies look for evidence of soft skills development that shows a candidate's ability to mature into a person they want to interact with on a daily basis. You're going to grow a lot during a bootcamp, but the three areas recruiting companies want to see high progression include:

  • Learn to learn: Companies want to see that you are in charge of learning, you are aware of changes in the industry, you are able to learn by yourself and you can learn quickly. Why? Simple, technology is constantly evolving and changing. As Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas put it in The Pragmatic Programmer, our "knowledge becomes obsolete as new techniques, languages, and environments are developed." The technology stack the company is working with will evolve and change over time, so the company wants people who can not only keep up, but also lead the charge and make recommendations.
  • Focus: The bootcampers with the most job openings tend to be those who learn to focus intensely on programming. Most of the people who come to bootcamps haven't spent the whole day programming, and it can be a huge psychological change for many. If a bootcamper focuses on the bootcamp and nothing more than the bootcamp, it will show up in the interviews and in the final project. Intense concentration, free from distractions like family and friends, shows when you sit down for that interview.
  • Teamwork: Software is primarily about people: the people who need it, the people who pay for it, and the people who build it. Companies are looking for employees who have grown strong and have demonstrated their ability to work as a team. Successful candidates talk about the people they worked with, what they learned from other people, what they taught other people, and the impact their work had or will have on people. Gerald Weinberg, noted author and computer scientist, once commented that "no matter what it looks like, at first, it's always a people problem." We tend to agree.


I'd like to talk more about whether boot camp (either Launch Academy or a different program) is an optimal route for you. Maybe we could connect through a Hangout at some point? If you're interested, let's talk on Twitter: @evancharlz

There is a very real possibility that you are trolling. There is a real possibility that it is not. I don't want to pretend to make up facts about the deal in questions.

I recently left a startup, I had a great idea, but quickly realized that there were some empty promises that couldn't be kept. Project wanted him to be CTO / Lead Designer / All Man. Basically, I have to dictate my own salary and my entire compensation package. I must say I wanted $ 12,000 a month ($ 144,000 gross a year). They offered me 27% equity. I found out that the CEO was giving me equity and planned for me to essentially fund my

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There is a very real possibility that you are trolling. There is a real possibility that it is not. I don't want to pretend to make up facts about the deal in questions.

I recently left a startup, I had a great idea, but quickly realized that there were some empty promises that couldn't be kept. Project wanted him to be CTO / Lead Designer / All Man. Basically, I have to dictate my own salary and my entire compensation package. I must say I wanted $ 12,000 a month ($ 144,000 gross a year). They offered me 27% equity. I learned that the CEO was giving me equity and I planned to basically fund my own paychecks until the company did. So yes, I would keep 27% of what the company was worth (effectively $ 0). Then I was taking notes to cover the bills to pay after a certain funding point.

At this point I decided to leave. Maybe I was wrong, and I hope to find that this is the next $ 100 billion deal and realize how badly I screwed up. But another thing I noticed was that I closed the invoices using notes (I am not an expert and maybe I am completely wrong, but if I am correct, maybe this is what could get you in trouble) I was under the impression that you were essentially going to get to pay income tax on that salary. So if I made an invoice for $ 12,000 and also generated a note paying that note with a 7% interest rate, then technically I financed 12,000 and would have nothing to show for it. This is where I freaked out and was afraid that I would pay 30% income tax on $ 144k, but actually I got 0. So something to keep in mind, If this agreement is written that way, you may have to give 20% of your reported first year salary on the first job you accept. So if you report $ 250k and you have to pay $ 50k, not bad. About 3 times what I earn now. But, what happens if after reporting it you work for 3 months and the project fails? You are hooked for $ 50k and made like $ 60k in 3 months. So actually you made $ 10k, you are taxed on $ 60k so you actually made like $ 5000 in 3 months or actually $ 1633 a month. And you are looking for more work. That is even assuming the situation is not more direct and you have a similar situation to mine where we will pay after Serie A can really destroy you. As if they didn't make it to Serie A, you're in a hurry for $ 50k. Just things to think about to make sure it's not possibilities. But, what happens if after reporting it you work for 3 months and the project fails? You are hooked for $ 50k and made like $ 60k in 3 months. So actually you made $ 10k, you are taxed on $ 60k so you actually made like $ 5000 in 3 months or actually $ 1633 a month. And you are looking for more work. That is even assuming the situation is not more direct and you have a similar situation to mine where we will pay after Serie A can really destroy you. As if they didn't make it to Serie A, you're in a hurry for $ 50k. Just things to think about to make sure it's not possibilities. But, What happens if after reporting it, you work for 3 months and the project fails? You are hooked for $ 50k and made like $ 60k in 3 months. So actually you made $ 10k, you are taxed on $ 60k so you actually made like $ 5000 in 3 months or actually $ 1633 a month. And you are looking for more work. That is even assuming the situation is not more direct and you have a similar situation to mine where we will pay after Serie A can really destroy you. As if they didn't make it to Serie A, you're in a hurry for $ 50k. Just things to think about to make sure it's not possibilities. And you are looking for more work. That is even assuming the situation is not more direct and you have a similar situation to mine where we will pay after Serie A can really destroy you. As if they didn't make it to Serie A, you're in a hurry for $ 50k. Just things to think about to make sure it's not possibilities. And you are looking for more work. That is even assuming the situation is not more direct and you have a similar situation to mine where we will pay after Serie A can really destroy you. As if they didn't make it to Serie A, you're in a hurry for $ 50k. Just things to think about to make sure it's not possibilities.

The moral I'm referring to is: Should I take this position? There is not enough information. If I saw an offer letter, I might be able to help you better.

Yes. You can. And here we show you how to estimate approximately how much you will earn after graduating from a top-tier program.

A short disclaimer here: not all bootcamps are created equal. Be sure to do your research to find out which type of bootcamp is right for you, including the location, format, and duration of the program that will work best for your learning style.

Here are three to get an understanding of your post-bootcamp paycheck (previously posted on the Skills Fund blog here)

  1. See the bootcamp results report. Side note: if the bootcamp you are interested in attending has no results r
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Yes. You can. And here we show you how to estimate approximately how much you will earn after graduating from a top-tier program.

A short disclaimer here: not all bootcamps are created equal. Be sure to do your research to find out which type of bootcamp is right for you, including the location, format, and duration of the program that will work best for your learning style.

Here are three to get an understanding of your post-bootcamp paycheck (previously posted on the Skills Fund blog here)

  1. See the bootcamp results report. Side note: If the training camp you are interested in attending does not have a results report, that is a yellow flag. It will be much more difficult to verify whether or not they are providing their graduates with the knowledge they need to excel. An increasing number of bootcamps and accelerated learning programs are making their results available for all to see: think about the rates of graduation, placement rates, and starting salary amounts. Members of the Council on Integrity in Results Reporting (CIRR) publish the salaries of their graduates on a quarterly basis. If the boot camp you want to attend is part of the CIRR, it will be easy to see how much money your graduates earn after completing the program. If your bootcamp is not part of the CIRR,
  2. Online databases and resources. While the information may be more anecdotal compared to an audited results report, you can get a general idea of ​​a job salary by researching on websites like salary.com and Glassdoor.
    1. How to find our potential salary:
      1. Find your job title (are you going to become a web developer? UX / UI designer? Data scientist? Etc.)
      2. Consider your location. Professionals in San Francisco will earn a different amount than people in Madison, Wisconsin, for example.
      3. How big is a company? The salary picture for a startup employee looks different compared to someone who works at a larger company.
  3. Connect with alumni. While it's never appropriate to ask someone what their salary is, connecting with bootcamp alumni is a great opportunity to learn more about life after bootcamp. What do you wish you had known before you signed up? How about a tip for when you're on the show? They have most likely gone through the same process that you are in now, so they will be more than happy to answer your questions. Don't forget to spend time looking at the Course Report and visiting communities like Reddit and (of course) Quora.

Keep in mind that salary is not everything. I know, I know, it's hard to believe, but you also have to consider the benefits. While you're on your post-boot camp job search, be sure to ask questions that will shape your work-life balance and retirement options. Ask about:

1. Flexibility. Can you work from home once in a while? Are there fixed hours every day or do you make your own schedule?

2. Benefits. Does the company contribute to your 401k? Are there stock options?

3. Free time. Is there a certain amount of time it is allowed to take off? Does it accumulate weekly or is it awarded at the beginning of the year?


I hope my answer helps you get on the right track. If you have any other questions about scheduling the bootcamps, I'd be more than happy to chat! I am at corinne@skills.fund.

I got a Software Engineering job after about a month.

They also offered me a very good salary with a nice bonus.

I had prior programming knowledge like HTML, CSS, JS / jQuery with a family job and I did it for free just for work experience.

After bootcamp again, I found a job pretty quickly and was able to show my past work experience.

They offered me a job for $ 250k / yr with a 20% bonus.

Very good for anyone who works especially for a few years for free. In 8 months I was promoted and now I received a salary of approximately $ 375,000 + 28% bonus and I own approximately 10% of the start-up

I invested in startup w

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I got a Software Engineering job after about a month.

They also offered me a very good salary with a nice bonus.

I had prior programming knowledge like HTML, CSS, JS / jQuery with a family job and I did it for free just for work experience.

After bootcamp again, I found a job pretty quickly and was able to show my past work experience.

They offered me a job for $ 250k / yr with a 20% bonus.

Very good for anyone who works especially for a few years for free. In 8 months I was promoted and now I received a salary of approximately $ 375,000 + 28% bonus and I own approximately 10% of the start-up

I invested in the startup with my Stock Investing that I was doing during bootcamp and working and a year before.

Now my stake is worth tens of millions +, making money doing what I love, I am a good friend of the founder and CEO and I work a minimum of hours as a developer (around 3).

I guess I was lucky with my first job, but I think the years of free work really helped me with my success. I'm still under 30, and most people my age are still graduating from school with more than $ 50,000 in debt.

I was anonymous for obvious reasons.

I would not agree with your premise. Many people are hired without a computer science degree. However, most of those people still have some kind of degree, probably in an engineering discipline.

If you have a degree (say, in Mechanical Engineering) and can demonstrate programming proficiency (through contributions to open source projects, participation in hackathons, etc.) on your CV, companies will show interest. It will be easier for a startup to hire you, but sometimes the bigger companies can find you.

If you are looking for a programming position at a startup, be sure to read Who Y Combinator

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I would not agree with your premise. Many people are hired without a computer science degree. However, most of those people still have some kind of degree, probably in an engineering discipline.

If you have a degree (say, in Mechanical Engineering) and can demonstrate programming proficiency (through contributions to open source projects, participation in hackathons, etc.) on your CV, companies will show interest. It will be easier for a startup to hire you, but sometimes the bigger companies can find you.

If you're looking for a startup programming position, be sure to read Who Y Combinator Companies Want - Triplebyte Blog.

If you are looking for a job at a larger company and are about to enroll in a bootcamp (or some other training program), find out beforehand which companies have drawn talent from that bootcamp. For example, if you subscribe to the Udacity Newsletter, you will read from time to time about a nanograduate student who got a job at one of Udacity's many partners. That's only possible because Udacity has established its quality close to those companies.

Another possibility of getting a job of this type is to solve a problem that the company already has. Here's a great article on that. How To Get Any Job You Want (Even If You Are Unskilled) - Life Learning

As a coding bootcamp graduate who became CTO of Career Karma, a startup backed by Y Combinator, I can say that while there are tons of coding bootcamps offered in Toronto, the best for the money, as far as I'm concerned. , is the one offered by the University of Toronto.

It's a collaboration with Trilogy Education Services, which is known for creating world-class coding bootcamps around the world, and has received rave reviews from students.

Tuition for this program is approximately the average for similar programs, CAD 10,500 for the entire program, no textbooks or other materials are required.

The bootca

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As a coding bootcamp graduate who became CTO of Career Karma, a startup backed by Y Combinator, I can say that while there are tons of coding bootcamps offered in Toronto, the best for the money, as far as I'm concerned. , is the one offered by the University of Toronto.

It's a collaboration with Trilogy Education Services, which is known for creating world-class coding bootcamps around the world, and has received rave reviews from students.

Tuition for this program is approximately the average for similar programs, CAD 10,500 for the entire program, no textbooks or other materials are required.

The bootcamp offers full and part-time courses in full stack web development, as well as data analysis and cybersecurity courses. If you want more details about the University of Toronto coding bootcamp, you can check out this in-depth article on the University of Toronto coding bootcamp.

Full disclosure: I am the CTO and one of the co-founders of Career Karma, a company that helps people become software engineers by being paired with the best coding bootcamps and also a bootcamp alumnus.

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