Did any of the highly successful entrepreneurs (Elon Musk, Richard Branson, etc.) have day jobs while working on their first business ideas at the same time?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Gerardo Burnett



Did any of the highly successful entrepreneurs (Elon Musk, Richard Branson, etc.) have day jobs while working on their first business ideas at the same time?

Entrepreneurs who kept their day job while working in a parallel company (until it was time to improve):

Sara Blakely kept her day job selling fax machines while working on her ideas for Spanx. For two years she worked nine to five and sold Spanx pantyhose in the evenings and on weekends. She didn't quit until she was sure her business venture would take off.

Markus Persson began developing Minecraft as a standalone project while working for King.com and later jAlbum. The alpha version of Minecraft was released in 2009. After sales expanded, he left jAlbum to work on Minecraft fu

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Entrepreneurs who kept their day job while working in a parallel company (until it was time to improve):

Sara Blakely kept her day job selling fax machines while working on her ideas for Spanx. For two years she worked nine to five and sold Spanx pantyhose in the evenings and on weekends. She didn't quit until she was sure her business venture would take off.

Markus Persson began developing Minecraft as a standalone project while working for King.com and later jAlbum. The alpha version of Minecraft was released in 2009. After sales expanded, he left jAlbum to work on Minecraft full time, starting video game company Mojang to support Minecraft development. In 2014, Persson sold Mojang to Microsoft for $ 2.5 billion

Larry Page and Sergey Brin both worked at Google while doing their PhD at Stanford. They both left Stanford when they decided it was time to start Google Inc. Brin was the only one who returned to finish his degree.


Entrepreneurs who quit their day job (or quit) before starting a new company:

Shahid Khan worked at the Flex-N-Gate automobile manufacturing company while attending the University of Illinois. When he graduated he was hired as the company's director of engineering. In 1978, he left and with $ 13,000 in savings and a $ 50,000 loan from Small Business Loan Corporation, he created the startup Bumper Works. In 1980, when he was 28, he raised enough to buy Flex-N-Gate.

Elon Musk applied for a job at Netscape but was turned down. He later went to graduate school as Stanford, but two days later, he was postponed with the option to return later. He started Zip2 with his brother and focused solely on it, while cutting his expenses to $ 30 a month for food. He rented an office, slept on the futon, and showered at the YMCA. In 1999, Compaq acquired Zip2 and Musk received $ 22 million from the sale.

Richard Branson dropped out of high school to start a magazine company called Student. He then founded a mail-order record company called Virgin to help fund his magazine company.

Bill Gates dropped out of Harvard and founded Microsoft with his friend Paul Allen, working on it full time. They had been researching Intel's 8080 microprocessor chip for a while, theorizing that computers with that chip would be affordable to the average person one day. When the Altair 8800 came out with Intel's 8080 chip, Gates and Allen knew it was time to make their move and start Microsoft and work on it full time.


We see entrepreneurs who became billionaires on both sides. But a common thread is that everyone did a thorough investigation beforehand. Blakely and Persson didn't quit their day job until they had confidence in their companies. Khan didn't quit until he had a good amount of savings. Musk did not leave Stanford until he was assured he could return in the future. Gates had been researching Intel's 8080 chip and had been preparing for a while to get on board when it appeared on a new computer. Page and Brin were doing PhD research while working at Google before dropping out to turn it into a company. Branson's Student magazine is the only company on this list that wasn't a huge success, but it relied on its subsequent companies to get it back.

So if you have an idea, do some primary market research, create a minimum viable product, see if people will buy it, and sell enough units until you are sure your idea will work. Don't quit your day job until you're ready to improve.

When I found my first company, I quit my job full time. I barely had a line of code written. He was crazy enough to think he was going to be successful. I was stealthy for 8 months. Released to the market. Clients didn't want what I built. It is not something I expected.

I highly recommend finding the customer first and faking your product. Once the customer sees the product after a few iterations, if they agree to pay for the product, you know exactly what to do. Build an MVP, Minimum Viable Product. Wait for initial customers to use the product and generate income. This is the best t

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When I found my first company, I quit my job full time. I barely had a line of code written. He was crazy enough to think he was going to be successful. I was stealthy for 8 months. Released to the market. Clients didn't want what I built. It is not something I expected.

I highly recommend finding the customer first and faking your product. Once the customer sees the product after a few iterations, if they agree to pay for the product, you know exactly what to do. Build an MVP, Minimum Viable Product. Wait for initial customers to use the product and generate income. This is the best time to ask yourself if you have to quit your day job or not.

The answer is how much money the idea can make, how to scale it and see if this really is a BUSINESS or an idea.

Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, worked at Xerox and a Swedish home accessories company called Hammarplast before landing a job at the original Starbucks in Seattle, which he later bought and incorporated into the company we know today.

This problem should be treated with the utmost caution. Let aspiring prenueurs have the freedom to choose between keeping their day job (s) and working on their startups or burning all the bridges to focus on their startups. Either way, both have implications. But when caution and rationality is applied in the process, the fingers will not burn.

It depends on what you are choosing them for.

If I wanted them as TV / movie actors, then with 100% certainty I wouldn't cast Elon! If you ever saw his "cameo" appearances on "Big Bang Theory", you would know what I'm saying!

RIchard Branson is a great businessman, but he wouldn't be a great rocket engine designer. He started Virgin Galactic in 2004, taking previous work from Scaled Composites to get him going. He predicted the first commercial flights in 2009, and here we are, 11 years later, with no commercial flights.

Elon Musk founded SpaceX in 2002, but without the previous work that Virgin Galactic had.

I rea

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It depends on what you are choosing them for.

If I wanted them as TV / movie actors, then with 100% certainty I wouldn't cast Elon! If you ever saw his "cameo" appearances on "Big Bang Theory", you would know what I'm saying!

RIchard Branson is a great businessman, but he wouldn't be a great rocket engine designer. He started Virgin Galactic in 2004, taking previous work from Scaled Composites to get him going. He predicted the first commercial flights in 2009, and here we are, 11 years later, with no commercial flights.

Elon Musk founded SpaceX in 2002, but without the previous work that Virgin Galactic had.

Do I really have to compare where SpaceX is now compared to Virgin Galactic?

But then Virgin Airlines has proven to be a great airline - it cut the cost of transatlantic travel and continues to be a strong brand - Branson is a good business manager ... but I think a bad judge of technology.

Bill Gates is also a great businessman, but with fairly normal technical skills. He built one of the largest companies in the world from literally nothing ... and his charitable endeavors after his retirement are tremendous. Sadly, I have no fond memories of Microsoft - they've been utterly evil throughout ... although it's hard to say if this is because Gates drove it that way, or didn't get in the way of making it that way. Microsoft's dominance in the early 8086 software market and its obscene insistence on retaining the 640 kbyte RAM limit set the personal computer market back for nearly a decade. Everything Microsoft touches turns into an ugly mess ... it always has ... it still does.

Gates sure did a phenomenal job as a businessman, but the cost to the software industry was terrible ... and Linus Torvalds had to save him.

Then what do you want?

  • A good actor?
  • A charity leader?
  • A tech genius?

I do not know.

The evolution of Elon Musk: the good, the bad, and the ugly

As someone who considers himself up to date with the latest news and trends in all design and innovation, I was surprised when I saw a Facebook post in December. My friend was calling Elon Musk for being an idiot (and no, he wasn't one of those Facebook friends who rants about everything). He was referring to a Twitter battle between Musk and Jarrett Walker, a public transportation policy consultant with a doctorate in humanities.

Their dispute on Twitter started due to Elon's comments at an AI conference. Musk had shouted publ

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The evolution of Elon Musk: the good, the bad, and the ugly

As someone who considers himself up to date with the latest news and trends in all design and innovation, I was surprised when I saw a Facebook post in December. My friend was calling Elon Musk for being an idiot (and no, he wasn't one of those Facebook friends who rants about everything). He was referring to a Twitter battle between Musk and Jarrett Walker, a public transportation policy consultant with a doctorate in humanities.

Their dispute on Twitter started due to Elon's comments at an AI conference. Musk had criticized public transportation as a "pain in the butt" and that you could end up carpooling with someone "who could be a serial killer." This led to a series of tweets from Walker targeting Musk, saying that Musk wanted to create a public transportation system designed for the protection of the elite. To which Musk simply replied, "You're an idiot."

Up until this point, he had always thought of Elon Musk as a great leader and an innovation guru. I had nothing but respect for him. But these comments really touched me. After a quick Google search, I saw a couple of other articles that cast it in a negative light. This made me wonder if I was the jerk for thinking he was a great guy all the time. It also made me realize that I really didn't know much about him. This left me with a burning question: is he an idiot or a thought leader that we should aspire to be?

With Christmas fast approaching, I added the biography of Elon, Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX and the search for a fantastic future, to my wish list. I decided that this internal debate could only be answered with a thorough investigation. What follows is my quest to answer this question. During my journey through Ashlee Vance's incredible book, my thoughts on Musk went back and forth seeing the good, the bad, and the ugly in him. So I decided to divide Musk's life into 6 stages highlighting each of these different sides. Only after looking at all the parts was I able to come to a conclusion to this question.

Little boy musk

  • The Good: As a child, Elon had an insatiable appetite for learning. I often read a book a day. His most notable achievement came after he convinced his father to buy him a Commodore VIC-20 (an old computer). According to the manual, it is supposed to take around 6 months to complete all the BASIC lessons. He stayed up for 3 days in a row and finished everything. Then he designed a complete video game about it; whose source code was published in a magazine that earned him $ 500.
  • The bad: He was teased and bullied as a child. Sometimes this amounted to physical violence. On one occasion he was beaten so badly that he passed out and was hospitalized for a whole week.
  • The ugly: His father seems to be the darkest and most private aspect of his life. It seems like he may have been abusive, maybe not physically, but at least mentally. While Musk talked to the author about most of the issues, he refused to talk about his father saying “It's good for making life miserable. I don't know how someone becomes like him. "

First business musk

  • The good: he left South Africa alone with nothing and no one. He went to Canada, where he remained for a time, without a permanent home, until his brother joined him. They headed to Palo Alto and started their first business. Zip2 was basically mapquest before mapquest (which was Google Maps before Google Maps). It would end up selling for $ 307 million. Cha-ching.
  • The Bad: While Elon and his brother were able to create a successful company, they struggled with the powers of their investors. Investors forced the product onto media companies as more of a business directory rather than the B2C address Musk had hoped for. To make matters worse, Elon also experienced his first canceled meltdown catastrophe (#foreshadowing).
  • The ugly: Less than a decade after being essentially homeless in Canada, Elon was now Silicon Valley's last rich man. It is here that we see the first signs that Elon is potentially turning into an idiot. He bought one of the 62 McLarens (really expensive cars) in the world. He drove it so much in the Valley that he began to earn a reputation for being an idiot.

The young and rich musk

  • The good: In addition to buying McLaren, Elon invested all his money in his next company, a company that would change the banking industry. At the time, people said they were crazy and that consumers would never trust Internet security for online banking. His company, http://X.com, was more successful than anyone would have thought possible. It even beat out its biggest competitor, PayPal, started by Peter Thiel when they agreed to merge and Elon became the largest shareholder.
  • The Bad: 'Wait, I thought Elon founded Paypal?' - you might be thinking to yourself. Well, while Elon was on a plane starting his honeymoon, one of the most disgusting coups of all time occurred in Silicon Valley. After the plane landed, he headed straight back to try and save it only to be kicked out as CEO. They were later renamed PayPal.
  • The Ugly: After another horrible merger process, Elon finally had some time to step back and go on their honeymoon. However, he ended up contracting malaria in South Africa and nearly died from it. One doctor said he was one day away from dying. After 6 months and 45 pounds lost, he survived. This was just in time for eBay to buy PayPal for $ 1.5 billion, bringing Elon $ 250 million. Cha-ching! While this may sound like a great thing, a book titled The PayPal Wars was published right after the deal that depicted Elon as the villain of the entire company.

Photo by SpaceX via Unsplash

Starting SpaceX Musk

  • The Good: After his near-death experience, Elon reviewed his childhood dreams of going to Mars. He visited the NASA website one day and found no plan, not even mention, of going to Mars. Puzzled, he headed to Russia to see if he could buy a rocket himself. After being pushed around with ridiculous prices, Elon immersed himself in books studying how rockets are built. On his plane ride home from Russia, he stated that he would build the rocket himself with a spreadsheet detailing how to do it. Thus was born SpaceX.
  • The Bad: While SpaceX was in full home mode, Elon's first child, Nevada, was born. Unfortunately, he died of sudden infant death syndrome.
  • The Ugly: At SpaceX, Elon quickly earned a reputation as a staunch leader. One employee said: “If Elon wasn't happy, you knew it. Things could get ugly. "Even one of SpaceX's best employees, Steve Davis, experienced Elon's carelessness. Davis was once assigned a task that seemed so impossible that another engineer said," No other engineer Any other aerospace company would never have tried. "The assignment was to take a piece that was listed for $ 120,000 and build it on Elon's proposed budget of $ 5,000. Davis spent nine months and dedicated his life to it. In the end, was able to do it for only $ 3,900! Davis emailed Elon detailing his greatest achievement to which Elon simply replied 'Ok'.

Tesla Musk 'Foundation'

  • The Good: Elon had always seen a future of fully electric cars. So when Martin Eberhard and Marc Tarpenning approached Musk about becoming the first investor in a company called Tesla, Elon agreed. I wanted the car to be a picture of the sustainable future. I wanted it to be a luxury brand and not a 'silly-looking Prius'. So he had a lot to say with the creation of the company in Silicon Valley (as opposed to Detroit) and with the visual design of the car.
  • The Bad: As soon as Tesla created their first viable concept car, they decided to have a big press event. The event was a success with 30 high-profile customers pre-ordering the car for $ 90,000. The bad news for Elon was that he was not listed as a founder in the press release. To make matters worse, a NY Times article about the company also left Elon Musk out. I was angry.
  • The ugly: When Tesla was starting to work to fulfill its first round of pre-ordered cars, things weren't going so well. The car parts were too expensive and everything was late. Musk wasn't happy, so it was his turn to plan a hit. He asked the board to replace Martin Eberhard as CEO. They agreed and the original founder of the company left. After an interim CEO, Musk took over in 2008.

Photo by Matt Henry via Unsplash

Leader in SpaceX, Tesla, Hyperloop, SolarCity and The Boring Company, Musk

  • The Good: At this point, Elon has become adept at leading multiple companies under extreme pressure at the same time. In 2008, things were not looking very good for Tesla and SpaceX. By Musk's calculations, he only had enough money to save one company. Rather than panic, Elon was able to stay calm long enough for SpaceX to win a contract to become NASA's official supplier to the ISS. A similar "Tesla could go bankrupt" situation happened again in 2013. It was so bad that Elon actually had a handshake deal with Google to buy and save Tesla. This never happened, as Tesla's sales team was able to beat projections and its shares soared.
  • The Bad: Elon's leadership style remained fierce (to say the least). To accelerate the pace of the Tesla Model S design, they had two groups of employees working 24 hours a day. To quote the author, "It's never enough for Musk." For example, in 2010 SpaceX had just successfully launched its Dragon capsule; And just before the party, Musk called his top executives to yell at them (in a tux in front of his loved ones) because one of the parts of a future rocket was late.
  • The ugly: Since he ran multiple companies at once, his ugly side has definitely reached its ugliest heights. Elon got divorced and his ex-wife, Justine, wrote a lot of nasty articles on her blog about him. He was sued by the original founder of Tesla, Martin Eberhard, for his expulsion from the company. And the crown jewel of his ugliness came from the treatment of his longtime executive assistant, Mary Beth Brown. Basically, he did everything for him in every company. She never left his side. So one day she asked to be paid as an executive. He told her to take a two-week vacation and that she would try to see if she could do her job. When she returned, he told her that he no longer needed her. Note: he denied it on Twitter 2 years after the book was published.

THE UNIVERSAL THEORY OF MUSK

Throughout Elon's evolution, I struggled to find an event that would define him. There are so many ups and downs that I couldn't point to one moment and say 'Yeah, he's an idiot for this.' or 'Yeah, he's someone we should aspire to for that.' I had to look at the whole of his life to make sense of it.

What was clear throughout the book is that Elon operates differently than most successful people today. Jeff Hammerbacher, one of Facebook's early engineers, says that "the best minds of our generation are thinking about how to get people to click on ads." And Elon agrees with him saying, “I think there are probably too many smart people who are into internet, finance and law matters. That's part of the reason we haven't seen so much innovation. "But it is this statement that reveals that Elon does not seek these small innovations. He always pursues his larger purpose.

I would like to die thinking that humanity has a bright future. If we can solve sustainable energy and be on our way to becoming a multiplanetary species with a self-sustaining civilization on another planet ... I think that would be really good. - Elon Musk

In the final paragraph of the biography, the author ends with “I asked Musk directly how much he was willing to risk. Your answer? Everything that other people appreciate. I would die on Mars. If my wife and I had a lot of children, she would probably stay with them on Earth. "

Seeing Elon in this light connects many points. The goal of the video game he created as a child was to save the world from an alien space freighter. At university, he wrote articles detailing his sustainable energy plans to ensure that "civilization can continue to progress." Even the founding of all his businesses was not driven by profit motives, but was working to create a system of interconnected companies that can help our species in both the short and long term.

So with this universal understanding of Musk, where does that leave us with our initial question?

It leads me to conclude that Elon cares about one thing above all else: saving our species. He cares so much about this that it doesn't matter if people think he's an idiot. For him, the common good is more important than the feelings of an individual (even those of his family). So at the end of the day, I have to say that Elon Musk is a jerk, but he's also an innovative jerk that we should aspire to be.

I worked for two of their companies ... Solar City (now Tesla Solar) and Tesla. My experience was not very good ... I was working at Solar City when he officially took office (he was already a major shareholder before that). At the time, sales were in a slight drop compared to the previous year, but shortly after he officially took over, those sales went into a death spiral. Elon decided that he really didn't like the aesthetic nature of solar 'panels' and decided to make a quick transition to the solar 'roof'. 'Roof' was still in the design phase. Made the decision to start taking sunroof deposits and

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I worked for two of their companies ... Solar City (now Tesla Solar) and Tesla. My experience was not very good ... I was working at Solar City when he officially took office (he was already a major shareholder before that). At the time, sales were in a slight drop compared to the previous year, but shortly after he officially took over, those sales went into a death spiral. Elon decided that he really didn't like the aesthetic nature of solar 'panels' and decided to make a quick transition to the solar 'roof'. 'Roof' was still in the design phase. Made the decision to start taking solar roof reservoirs and stop pressing solar panels. He also decided to ditch the sales teams (80%). I wanted to boost online sales (just like Tesla Auto does). That sales model did not work and sales fell rapidly. The sunroof is amazing aesthetically, and the product is mature, yet the means to install it, and the price is still prohibitive for the masses. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries.

Since taking office two years ago, Solar City (Tesla) has seen massive layoffs and layoffs. Thousands of hard-working people have lost their jobs (50%) due to poor business decisions. You don't hear much about this, nor do you hear much about their layoffs at Tesla Auto (they've had massive layoffs, too). I don't know many people who still work there, but the couple of people I do know say it's a shadow of what it once was ... and ... morale is at an all-time low. You don't hear much about this either. What you hear about are the next… latest and greatest Musk ventures. Why is that? It is due to carefully coordinated marketing and manipulation of your "brand" ...

I will say that when I worked there the internal training provided / offered to all employees was outstanding. The apps (we used a lot of them) to preform our jobs were well written and allowed employees to work efficiently.

Also noteworthy ...

When I started there, we had over 125 employees working outside of my office. When I was fired, there were 17 employees left. Most of those employees consisted of 2 installation teams, a person to perform each of the specific functions of the office, a manager and an administrative assistant, and a couple of people in the warehouse.

In my opinion, the supposedly innovative business models of Elon and the 'Vision' deserve the criticism and scrutiny that it is now waiting to receive.

In my time there (just under two years) I only knew one employee who owned a Tesla. That's because, frankly, no one who works there can afford them. Met a handful of employees (out of hundreds) who have solar power on their roof, and one who knew they had the Tesla battery in the home (power wall) ... As an employee, there really is no incentive to buy any of the products ... Especially cars! If you bought a solar system, you got a $ 1000 discount, but had to wait until there was a space in the schedule to accommodate the installation. The average price of a residential solar system, even after rebates / incentives, usually starts at 25 to 30K. Depending on the size, it goes up quickly from there. Most of the employees simply couldn't afford them.

They paid me less than promised. They showed me the same kind of pay scales that are shown to everyone. I NEVER had a chance to win that amount of money. You could have spent 70-80 hours or more trying, but the payment was directly related to sales volume (it wasn't in sales just to be clear), and that's common sense ... when sales went down, so was made the most of ALL the employees pay. Very few people received a salary and they were some of the first to be fired.

I don't see any first-hand accounts of people who worked for a Musk company. All I see, as answers, are cuts and pastes from what I call the 'Musk propaganda machine' ...

He talks a good game ... but what has he actually accomplished other than becoming a billionaire? I guess you can envy that ... but admire him, how does he do it? I hope not.

Elon Musk has been working on many ideas simultaneously, but the people who work for him do a tremendous amount of real work. That equates to thousands of people in various companies. Elon Musk has several traits including, but not limited to:

  1. Working very hard for a long time.
  2. Intelligence.
  3. Thinking from the first principles.
  4. Accelerated training above all.
  5. Inspiring great people who work with him.
  6. Your ability to 'get started'.
  7. He does not conceive of failure.

  • Multitasking is not easy for most people, and you are certainly not a normal person. He has a crazy work ethic that almost
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Elon Musk has been working on many ideas simultaneously, but the people who work for him do a tremendous amount of real work. That equates to thousands of people in various companies. Elon Musk has several traits including, but not limited to:

  1. Working very hard for a long time.
  2. Intelligence.
  3. Thinking from the first principles.
  4. Accelerated training above all.
  5. Inspiring great people who work with him.
  6. Your ability to 'get started'.
  7. He does not conceive of failure.

  • Multitasking is not easy for most people, and you are certainly not a normal person. He has a crazy work ethic that hardly anyone can match. You must be constantly thinking only about work and big ideas all day, week after week, year after year for the last ~ 15 years or more.
  • That work ethic inspires others around you to do more. He has consistently claimed that he works 85 to 90 hours and sometimes even 100 hours a week and it is certainly not easy to do. This trait, while possible for many people, is very difficult to maintain for long. Most people who work that hard eventually give up after a few months or years. Elon Musk has been holding it for some time.
  • Most of the people who have known or worked with him have called on him to be super smart. It all comes from first principles thinking that applies to almost everything. The whole thought process goes with a semantic tree where you first understand the main parts of the tree, and then the details are reduced to the branches and leaves.
  • You have been reading many books and they contain a great deal of knowledge. An average person reads only one book per month. He reads a book in a day and has been reading a lot since he was young. Comparatively, you could have read at least 50-100 times more than the average person and the knowledge is magnified like anything.
  • Great multitaskers get so amazing that when they think they are writing their emails, they have made their best decisions and can do so at a speed several times faster than most people in the world. Personally, I've seen people like this who are able to think, write, convince, build ideas on the fly, and eliminate non-value-adding things on the fly much faster than a group of people put together.
  • How do they do this? They practice one skill at a time, reach a new height, and become ten times better than others. Then they learn two skills at the same time and try to be better than everyone else.
    • Take this as an example:
      • If you are a better thinker than 90% of people.
      • You are a better writer than 90% of people.
      • You can type faster than 90% of people.
      • Combined ~ You can think, write, and type faster than 99.9 percent of people if they were all independent sets. (Although they are not usually independent sets, you get an idea).
    • The point is that the more skills multiply, the more and more unique you are as a person, and certainly he is a much more unique person than many others.
  • Talking to lots of people will generally give someone lots of perspectives, ideas, and inspiration. Elon is surrounded by so many amazing people from all over the world.

I have written quite a few posts on Elon Musk. Take a look at some of them that are more specific about various things people have asked on Quora.

Check out some of my other answers:

  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How do I retain the information I read from books?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How does Elon Musk study? How efficient are your methods compared to others?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How realistic is Elon Musk's plan to dig tunnels under Los Angeles through the Boring Company?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to Will we see some cool stuff from Elon Musk's new company Neuralink for 2021?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to What are the key differences between Elon Musk and other entrepreneurs?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How does Elon Musk study? How efficient are your methods compared to others?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to Has anyone in their life improved by aspiring to be like Elon Musk?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to What productivity tools does Elon Musk use?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How did Elon Musk do so many things in such a short time?
  • Rohit Malshe's Answer to Is Elon Musk the Next Steve Jobs?
  • Rohit Malshe's response to Elon Musk's ventures appears to be moving ridiculously fast, while others are stagnant. Why?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to What can we learn from Elon Musk?
  • Rohit Malshe's answer to How did Elon Musk work 100 hours a week for over 15 years?

There are many options for contacting Sir Richard Branson, as the people are described below.

However, you should not contact Sir Richard Branson with your business idea (I will explain an alternative later).

Here is why:

He is a very busy person.

Even if you can get in touch with him, there is a very small chance that he will even listen to your speech over the phone or email without ending the call or answering and deleting the email. This is because most accredited investors, like Sir Branson, don't have the time to invest in ideas that are just ideas. The companies in which they will invest must have v

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There are many options for contacting Sir Richard Branson, as the people are described below.

However, you should not contact Sir Richard Branson with your business idea (I will explain an alternative later).

Here is why:

He is a very busy person.

Even if you can get in touch with him, there is a very small chance that he will even listen to your speech over the phone or email without ending the call or answering and deleting the email. This is because most accredited investors, like Sir Branson, don't have the time to invest in ideas that are just ideas. The companies they will invest in must have validated prototypes and usually an initial revenue stream. And you want to respect your time in a company that can

Ideas do not give ROI

Many investors and entrepreneurs, including Sir Richard Branson, want to invest in companies that can give them a return on their investment. When the business idea is in the idea phase, there is no certainty about what will happen and how it will develop. The idea at least needs to be validated with prototypes or very detailed plans that have at least been tested in the market.

Start your first business on your own

If you are looking to start your first business and ask Sir Richard Branson or other great entrepreneurs without doing the things mentioned above, you should consider finding a business idea that you can start yourself. This way, you will be able to fund the biggest ideas you have once your first business is successful and impress the big name entrepreneurs you want to contact to collaborate on your next great business idea.

I bet Richard is a great guy who would love to chat with you, but if he doesn't get in touch, the reasons above may be why. But you have an alternative to follow. And then you should try to reach out to the entrepreneur that you are interested in raising funds from. I guarantee that your chances of success will be much higher than if you just kept the idea on paper and tried what you are doing.

If you want to learn how to think of a complementary business idea that you can really get started, you can visit https://www.businessideainsight.com

I really admire Mr. Branson as a person primarily based on his passion as a "people person". Its other qualities are its risk from companies like Virgin Airlines and Virgin Mobile. But beyond that is his deep empathy for his fellow man. You have the innate ability to connect with people at different levels, from the worker to the CEO of a company. He is never too proud to please anyone when it comes to topics related to the "Virgin" universe. It is the face of your company and wears that distinction with great pride. I can only hope to have the same attributes of Mr. Branson in his application

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I really admire Mr. Branson as a person primarily based on his passion as a "people person". Its other qualities are its risk from companies like Virgin Airlines and Virgin Mobile. But beyond that is his deep empathy for his fellow man. You have the innate ability to connect with people at different levels, from the worker to the CEO of a company. He is never too proud to please anyone when it comes to topics related to the "Virgin" universe. It is the face of your company and wears that distinction with great pride. I can only hope to have the same attributes as Mr. Branson in his approach to representing his company. You hold to the standards of what it means to build a successful business.

However, it goes beyond that. He is a truly generous person in sharing his success. There have been many accounts of him lending his various properties for the enjoyment of others and creating an atmosphere in which his employees enjoy working for his company. He is dedicated to the promise that his customers will enjoy his products and services; otherwise they will find a way to solve any problem. It is a success because it involves people, listens to their needs and is able to spread happiness. All key to a successful entrepreneur.

All communications between inmates and outside channels are facilitated by approved volunteers as inmates do not have access to the Internet. This Quora show is part of The Last Mile San Quentin. Twitter: @TLM

Well, every generation has its great innovators. Da Vinci, Edison, Jobs ... men whose contribution has changed the course of technology. Another name that can be added to that list and that is not alien to those who have not lived under a rock is that of Elon Reeve Musk, a man who today is changing the face of technology, innovation and creativity. This South African-born Canadian-American business magnate, investor, engineer and inventor has numerous major innovations under his belt, the impact of which is unimaginable.

Here is a short list of the things Musk has done for this world:

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Well, every generation has its great innovators. Da Vinci, Edison, Jobs ... men whose contribution has changed the course of technology. Another name that can be added to that list and that is not alien to those who have not lived under a rock is that of Elon Reeve Musk, a man who today is changing the face of technology, innovation and creativity. This South African-born Canadian-American business magnate, investor, engineer and inventor has numerous major innovations under his belt, the impact of which is unimaginable.

Here is a short list of the things Musk has done for this world:

1. Tesla Motors

It's impossible to think of Musk and not think of Tesla - Strikingly one of its best-known innovations, Tesla is an electric car company that offers all-electric vehicles to consumers. Your Model 3 car retails for a starting price of $ 35,000. There is a high demand for Tesla cars due to their environmental benefits.

2. SpaceX

Tesla and SpaceX are in a close fight when it comes to popularity; However, both are equally valuable. Founded in 2002, the eponymous SpaceX aims to reduce the cost of space expeditions and enable the colonization of Mars. So far they have flown more than six cargoes and have an employment contract with NASA to produce spacecraft for NASA crew members to and from international space stations.

3. PayPal

Online payment giant PayPal is also Musk's brainchild. Founded in 1999, Musk started an organization called http://X.com, which focused on financial services and email payments. A year after starting their operations, they merged with Confinity and adopted their best-selling product, PayPal.

Imagine the kind of revolution and ease in transactions you have purchased.

4. Hyperloop

The Hyperloop - high-speed capsule travel inside a partial vacuum tube - is the brainchild of Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who opened the basic design in 2013 in the form of a white paper. The transportation system, which was introduced in 2013, aims to reduce travel time from hours to minutes. It will be 4 times faster than a commercial flight.

5.5. Zip2

This was Musk's first web software company. Founded with his brother and financed with money loaned by his father, Zip2 aimed to make city guides for newspaper companies, so they could categorize them for their users. He later sold the company to Compaq for $ 22 million.

6. SolarCity

One great thing about all of Musk's inventions is that he is always trying to make life easier for users and bring about change that will not only relax the way things work, but will have various other benefits as well. SolarCity, in the same light, is a project that aims to provide solar power systems in the US and is the second largest in its field.

7. Electric jet

Still, in Musk's catalog of ideas, he's considering electric supersonic jets, which will basically have "vertical takeoff and landing."

With this in action, electric motors could have a fan to propel the aircraft and then not need a runway to fly, making airports shorter.

8. Musk Foundation

More creation than innovation, the Musk Foundation is there to promote ideas from the grassroots. The organization aims to support young minds and provide grants that support research on renewable energy, space exploration, childhood diseases and disorders, and educational efforts.

So far, the organization has given $ 783,700, including a $ 250,000 donation for a solar power project in Sōma.

9. Web-based phone calls

A little less intricate than Skype, Musk's plan was for computers to call landlines and he even filed a patent in 2002. Basically, he wanted to use the information provided on the Web to simplify the calling process. Ideally, users would see the number on the screen, press the Call button, and then calls would be routed to the business through a call center.

10. Interior

A combination of Quora, Wikipedia, and AskJeeves, Musk invested in Mahalo in 2007 - the site allows people to post questions and get answers. Unfortunately, this one didn't work out quite well for him. After Google revolutionized the search system, the company was forced to downsize its operations to just making 'how-to' videos and answering live user-generated questions.

11. Location-specific searches

We all know how Google and many other tech giants target people based on their locations. But all of this didn't exist in the early days of the internet. In 1998, it was Musk who thought of creating a system that would adapt to people's geographic locations and then automatically return results for the closest places.

His Wikipedia page features a long list of his accomplishments. He is the founding CEO and CTO of SpaceX: co-founder, CEO and product architect of Tesla Inc .; co-president of OpenAI; and founder and CEO of Neuralink.

A revolutionary transportation both on earth and in space, Musk's estimated net worth is $ 20.8 billion.

Peace!!

Tesla Motors isn't just about smooth, beautiful electric cars.

It's much more than that.

Do you know that Elon Musk did not start the Tesla Motors company?

It took it from its previous founders in a hostile takeover.

Shocking but true

Tesla's original CEO reveals what it's like to be fired by Elon Musk

Too much has been said and done about Elon Musk from the beginning.

Before we delve into that part, let's reflect on something closely related to the answer.

Has any scientist made a more important contribution than Einstien's theory of relativity?

And did you get very little credit for your work?

YE

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Tesla Motors isn't just about smooth, beautiful electric cars.

It's much more than that.

Do you know that Elon Musk did not start the Tesla Motors company?

It took it from its previous founders in a hostile takeover.

Shocking but true

Tesla's original CEO reveals what it's like to be fired by Elon Musk

Too much has been said and done about Elon Musk from the beginning.

Before we delve into that part, let's reflect on something closely related to the answer.

Has any scientist made a more important contribution than Einstien's theory of relativity?

And did you get very little credit for your work?

Yes.

Who created the induction motor and alternating current (AC) power transmission, without which humanity would be caught halfway on the path of rapid advancement?

Un científico estadounidense serbio - Nikola Tesla

Yes. The name Tesla Motors is a homage to this great scientist - Nikola Tesla.

Inspire of his many contributions, Nikolai Tesla died a pauper as a result of various personal and public relations failure.

If you understand a bit of science , think where we would be without the electric induction motor ?

Most electrical devices we use everyday would simply not run., would not exist.

Elon Musk is taking Tesla Motors , to the next level .

To that level no other man on Earth can currently take it .

Nikola Tesla would be watching from somewhere among the stars and reminding himself

" Nobody can take away from you , what you truly deserve "

It may take a 10 , 20 or a 100 years .

You may not be alive to witness glory thrust upon your name—

What you truly deserved.

But you will get what you deserve some day or the other.

Elon is incharge now.

He is now responsible and incharge of the forgotten legacy of Nikola Tesla and raise his name like a Phoenix from the ashes of Nikola Tesla's grave.

Nobody can do it better than him , he has proven that.

At least for now.

That differentiates him from the rest.

And where is Einsteins legacy today ?

It's only there in history text books .

Nikola Tesla got the glory he deserved upon his name .

All because of this one man —

Elon Musk

Many people still have not heard about Nikola Tesla, please spread the news

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