Career Tip: I was recently contacted on LinkedIn with a job interview offer. How can I check if the work is legitimate?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Devon Dillard



Career Tip: I was recently contacted on LinkedIn with a job interview offer. How can I check if the work is legitimate?

LinkedIn job postings are often not "offers." These are more likely to be generic emails sent by HR recruiting professionals to a group of people on LinkedIn with a particular skill set and background.

So how do they differ?

First, check to see if the person is someone you already know or is an acquaintance of someone you might know.

Second, check the nature of the email. If you give any references about how you were known or about your applications in the past, you may have been shortlisted.

Third, ideally they leave a direct contact so you can connect with them.

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LinkedIn job postings are often not "offers." These are more likely to be generic emails sent by HR recruiting professionals to a group of people on LinkedIn with a particular skill set and background.

So how do they differ?

First, check to see if the person is someone you already know or is an acquaintance of someone you might know.

Second, check the nature of the email. If you give any references about how you were known or about your applications in the past, you may have been shortlisted.

Third, they should ideally leave a direct contact for you to connect with. Generic emails tend to leave no options for communication other than emails or office reception numbers.

Lastly, even generic emails can be a hiring opportunity as they are in fact sent to fill the vacancies you may want to apply for, be interviewed, and ultimately get hired if you are the best candidate for it.

PS: Hires are very often based on references and you must be very competent and well prepared to pass interviews without them. So if you are planning a change, prepare well. All the best! :)

LinkedIn is a tool used by the most scrupulous recruiters, so reaching out to you through the site is a good sign.
I agree with Paul Alfred that Googling the online reputation of the company and the person who contacted you is a good tactic, but really, just talk to them. You will soon have an idea of ​​whether or not you want to work with them.

If you were offered a job like that from your LinkedIn profile without an interview, something is fishy.

If they reached out to you via LinkedIn and scheduled an interview and went through all the regular process, then it will be legitimate. I got my last job working for someone else like that.

You can verify the legitimacy of the talent management company by checking the online recommendations of the person who contacted you and calling on the phone, they would have to do a detailed evaluation and get your permission to send your resume to your client, if they think it has. the necessary qualifications.

The most memorable message I received contained the following:

Jason, pack your bags and get your desk ready. I have a position in my company that is going to change your life ... blah ... blah ... blah. "

I remember the "pack your bags" line because it was fresh and unique. I think I replied that I was working remotely and he ignored me.

That's it, I guess. It did not work.

LinkedIn is primarily a Ponzi scheme to extract money from recruiters, salespeople, and HR departments. Serious people don't pay much attention to LinkedIn. It is mostly full of marketers. I am a recruiter and I do not use the tool because

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The most memorable message I received contained the following:

Jason, pack your bags and get your desk ready. I have a position in my company that is going to change your life ... blah ... blah ... blah. "

I remember the "pack your bags" line because it was fresh and unique. I think I replied that I was working remotely and he ignored me.

That's it, I guess. It did not work.

LinkedIn is primarily a Ponzi scheme to extract money from recruiters, salespeople, and HR departments. Serious people don't pay much attention to LinkedIn. It is mostly full of marketers. I am a recruiter and I do not use the tool because it is too expensive and expensive.

Instead, I use a tool that allows me to Xray the LinkedIn LinkedIn Xray Search Tool by @recruitmentgeek to find the profiles of the decision makers I sell to. I communicate with them through their office phone or email. I avoid the LinkedIn platform. It's wacky and cumbersome.

Most busy people don't pay attention to LinkedIn. I only earn money from busy people doing things in the world. They don't pay attention to LinkedIn.

People who are not busy and trying to find a job spend time on LinkedIn. I'll say that LinkedIn has a pretty cool AI tool that matches your job title with job postings in your area. You will receive automated emails from LinkedIn informing you that "Amazon" is looking for candidates like you. I'm sure those emails are very attractive to people.

In general, I have a love-hate relationship with LinkedIn. I don't spend a lot of time on it. Most of the articles make me throw up. I know I'm supposed to go ahead and post some good content. I just don't feel like it.

PS: An interesting anecdote. A CEO I'm working with paid hundreds of dollars on LinkedIn and recruited a man. On the other hand, I used Indeed and paid $ 1 and recruited a fellow guy …… .. LinkedIn is expensive and overrated. I find talent of similar caliber on Indeed at a fraction of the cost.

Recruiters have to pay money to contact you on LinkedIn, so in my experience, they have generally identified that you are a good candidate for the position when you hear from them. Basically, if you respond respectfully and say that you are interested in learning more, chances are good that you can get an interview with the hiring manager.

Typically, the hiring process is like this ...

  1. Respond to the LinkedIn invite and ask if there is a time to have a phone call with the recruiter about the position.
  2. Have a 30 minute chat with the recruiter about the position.
  3. Say ah
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Recruiters have to pay money to contact you on LinkedIn, so in my experience, they have generally identified that you are a good candidate for the position when you hear from them. Basically, if you respond respectfully and say that you are interested in learning more, chances are good that you can get an interview with the hiring manager.

Typically, the hiring process is like this ...

  1. Respond to the LinkedIn invite and ask if there is a time to have a phone call with the recruiter about the position.
  2. Have a 30 minute chat with the recruiter about the position.
  3. Take a 30-minute call with a member of the company team to make sure that you are not lying at all on your LinkedIn profile about your skills.
  4. Conduct a 3-hour series of interviews with various potential clients and ultimately the hiring manager.
  5. Report to the recruiter
  6. Receive job offer

Sometimes the time between step 5 and step 6 can be very long, especially if you ask for a significant increase in salary, but typically the rest can happen in less than a week or two. Also, sometimes they will come back with an offer that is below the position you thought you were hiring for, but is still competitive. Again, if they are reaching out to you on LinkedIn, they desperately need people and have already identified that you are a strong candidate.

Personal recommendations to get the best salary offer ...

  • Say you are happy where you are, but are open to other positions if the job is interesting and the pay is good.
  • Ask the recruiter about the corporate structure, reports, job titles, etc. Take notes while talking on the phone.
  • Go online and validate the salary scales for the different positions in the corporate structure assigned to you by the recruiter.
  • Apply for a competitive offer within the salary scale of the position you are applying for, keeping in mind that anything that is a raise of more than 30% from your current position can be difficult to sell (but sometimes it is possible if you argue that for the post, it's competitive).

Good luck!

When you interview at multiple companies for a job, do you inform the company or recruiter that you are interviewing in multiple locations?

Only if they ask. Offering this information voluntarily could be construed as creating a "demand" situation. Having said that, it is a standard for recruiters to ask this question during initial screening. If the candidate declares that they are looking for other opportunities, and some of them are near the final stage, the recruiter may decide not to proceed. On the other hand, if there is a very close combination of skill sets, the recruiter may decide to speed up the process.

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When you interview at multiple companies for a job, do you inform the company or recruiter that you are interviewing in multiple locations?

Only if they ask. Offering this information voluntarily could be construed as creating a "demand" situation. Having said that, it is a standard for recruiters to ask this question during initial screening. If the candidate declares that they are looking for other opportunities, and some of them are near the final stage, the recruiter may decide not to proceed. On the other hand, if there is a very close combination of skill sets, the recruiter may decide to speed up the process.

Who do you report to if you do?

Obviously the person who asked. Typically this would be the recruiter (early stage) or hiring / HR manager (late stage).

Why?

Recruitment is a time-consuming affair, an organization spends several hours behind a single candidate. Obviously, no one likes to see their effort wasted, so it is considered professional to inform the company if you are almost certain that you will not go through with the process.

A potentially conflicting scenario is when two equally good opportunities mature in parallel and you would like to see both offers before making a decision. There is no 'right' way here, it depends on which company makes your offer first, how long they are willing to wait, etc.

I have recruited for companies with high levels of variability in the influence recruiters have. But recruiters generally make a decision about which candidates to participate in a hiring process so that from that front they have full control.

Throughout the process, they can help provide input on how much preparation they will give a candidate on what to expect at each stage. Imagine if you spent more time telling you exactly what kinds of questions will be asked and how you can practice asking those questions instead of having no information at all.

When hiring decisions are made, it can be a committee, consensus, or

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I have recruited for companies with high levels of variability in the influence recruiters have. But recruiters generally make a decision about which candidates to participate in a hiring process so that from that front they have full control.

Throughout the process, they can help provide input on how much preparation they will give a candidate on what to expect at each stage. Imagine if you spent more time telling you exactly what kinds of questions will be asked and how you can practice asking those questions instead of having no information at all.

When hiring decisions are made, it can be a committee, the consensus of the interviewers, or just the manager saying yes or no. If a recruiter is good, they will help guide the decision to measure the things that are really important and provide the candidate's story to help nuance the decision. This is another great area of ​​influence for a recruiter. They can often make or break this decision in both directions.

In the bidding stage, a recruiter is a driving force and representative of the company / team. They will have a hand in the negotiation, the position, the title, etc. These things are critical to helping a candidate make a decision and guiding the company to do their best for that person.

So ask, how much influence does a recruiter have on a candidate's chances? Much.

It's called direct search, which means that the recruiter prefers to find the right candidates on their own rather than relying on a job search platform to collect resumes or other recruiting channels. Or sometimes it may mean that you were unable to find a suitable candidate by other means.

No matter how you look at it, it can only be a good sign. If he calls you for an interview based on your LinkedIn profile, it also shows the quality of his content. You probably provided all the correct information that made that recruiter select you from a large pool of potential candidates. You can also m

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It's called direct search, which means that the recruiter prefers to find the right candidates on their own rather than relying on a job search platform to collect resumes or other recruiting channels. Or sometimes it may mean that you were unable to find a suitable candidate by other means.

No matter how you look at it, it can only be a good sign. If he calls you for an interview based on your LinkedIn profile, it also shows the quality of his content. You probably provided all the correct information that made that recruiter select you from a large pool of potential candidates. It can also mean that that particular recruiter knows how to spot and tempt a passive candidate, which again is a good point on the part of the company.

What happens from the interview is entirely up to you. Your LinkedIn profile, no matter how good it is, cannot guarantee the job; however, he managed to get them to meet face-to-face, so it's a huge step forward.

Thanks for the A2A, hope this helps.

Q: Are the jobs listed on LinkedIn fake?

It is possible, but the base rate of fake jobs should be a small fraction of the real ones, I think this is true anywhere where the cost of posting the job is high.

Companies are paying to post the jobs, so they should rationally expect some financial benefit. The most likely financial benefit is that they hope to fill the position.

Chances are, in any workplace someone is collecting email addresses for some spam purpose. To avoid this risk, many job seekers create a separate email address to separate their job search email from their regular email.

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Q: Are the jobs listed on LinkedIn fake?

It is possible, but the base rate of fake jobs should be a small fraction of the real ones, I think this is true anywhere where the cost of posting the job is high.

Companies are paying to post the jobs, so they should rationally expect some financial benefit. The most likely financial benefit is that they hope to fill the position.

Chances are, in any workplace someone is collecting email addresses for some spam purpose. To avoid this risk, many job seekers create a separate email address to separate their job search email from their regular email. Then they can simply stop checking the other email.

Here's what some recruiters do when trying to get new clients:

Research the companies that interest you. Go to LinkedIn and look for connections that may be connected to the hiring managers at those companies, request a presentation. If you receive a presentation, your goal will be to get a 20-minute phone or face-to-face briefing - gathering session. The keyword "information" not "ask about a job" is trying to develop a relationship.

If you don't have the necessary LinkedIn connection to get an introduction through LinkedIn, try searching for hiring managers for the same purpose t

Keep reading

Here's what some recruiters do when trying to get new clients:

Research the companies that interest you. Go to LinkedIn and look for connections that may be connected to the hiring managers at those companies, request a presentation. If you receive a presentation, your goal will be to get a 20-minute phone or face-to-face briefing - gathering session. The keyword "information" not "ask about a job" is trying to develop a relationship.

If you don't have the necessary LinkedIn connection to get an introduction through LinkedIn, try researching hiring managers for the same purpose of making the connection, you want to learn about the company, the nature of the work that the manager's team does, and The kind of people the manager hires - why does he like it there, know their background and experience, people like to talk about themselves, and they love to give advice.

In that 20 minute conversation, you will discuss your experience and describe your interest in working for the company; You will end your conversation by saying that you would love to stay in touch and learn about potential opportunities in your department or other departments.

This has to be a daily effort, even after landing your job. You are creating a professional network of people with authority and influence for hiring.

Hope this tip helps you.

LinkedIn profiles will hardly ever give you a job interview, but they will definitely help you once you get a job interview.

YOUR LINKEDIN PROFILE IS LIKE A COVER LETTER

It will only hurt you if you put something terribly bad on it, like a misspelled name, the wrong company, etc.

BUT it can make a big difference if you have a well completed profile.

Linkedin offers you the ability to not only tell the recruiter that you know how to do something, but you can also PROVE that you know how to do something.

Very rarely will you get an interview / job offer right outside of your LinkedIn profile unless you have a big r

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LinkedIn profiles will hardly ever give you a job interview, but they will definitely help you once you get a job interview.

YOUR LINKEDIN PROFILE IS LIKE A COVER LETTER

It will only hurt you if you put something terribly bad on it, like a misspelled name, the wrong company, etc.

BUT it can make a big difference if you have a well completed profile.

Linkedin offers you the ability to not only tell the recruiter that you know how to do something, but you can also PROVE that you know how to do something.

Very rarely will you get an interview / job offer right outside of your LinkedIn profile, unless you have a great reputation in your industry and are headhunters looking for a specific job.

If you would like more help from LinkedIn, feel free to connect and follow me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justindzuynguyen/

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