Can you use only peat to grow plants?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jermaine Cote



Can you use only peat to grow plants?

You can if you want to always water and use additional nutrients. Peat has little to no nutritional value and drains quickly. It's okay to start with seeds, but generally plants need more to thrive.

Too Dang Long, LOL

It depends on how you decide to grow it. If you grow the marijuana plant indoors, it is easy to manipulate the plant to grow indefinitely by adjusting the hours of light that you are giving the plant. For example, if you want the plant to grow long before it blooms, you must keep the light source on for more than 12 hours (depending on the variety). So basically 12+ hours of light = vegetative growth, 12 hours = flowering stage of growth.

If you want the plant to flower and thus end its life cycle, you must reduce the hours of daylight to less than 12 hours in a 24-hour period.

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Too Dang Long, LOL

It depends on how you decide to grow it. If you grow the marijuana plant indoors, it is easy to manipulate the plant to grow indefinitely by adjusting the hours of light that you are giving the plant. For example, if you want the plant to grow long before it blooms, you must keep the light source on for more than 12 hours (depending on the variety). So basically 12+ hours of light = vegetative growth, 12 hours = flowering stage of growth.

If you want the plant to flower and thus end its life cycle, you must reduce the hours of daylight to less than 12 hours in a 24-hour period. From this point on, your plant will begin the flowering stage, which is completely strain dependent, but once it begins to flower, your options are limited. You run the risk of your plant producing seeds if you try to return to the vegetative stage, as well as the risk of the plant dying from stress, which is less likely and worst-case scenario unless do it several times. .

Now for an outdoor-only plant, your options are limited to your area and the number of hours of sunlight you have. The same rules apply to the lighting hours and the vegetative and flowering stages. It is possible to do something known as light deprivation or light deposition, which requires depriving the plant of light in order to force it to flower.

Or in your case you can add light to continue the vegetative growth of taller plants, just keep in mind that a tall plant does not equate to more product in the end.

You can get comparable yields by doing selective FIMing (Fu & KI Missed) which consists of taking the top nodes and pinching the ones which then manipulate the plant to branch into 2 new branches. I'm sure you can see the benefits of this, but if you can't let me explain. FIM one branch that rotates tp 2, FIM those two and has four, and so on, and the end result is a short, bushy mass production plant!

Sorry for the crappy long grammar and execution in sentences, I hope this provided you with adequate information, I know it doesn't answer your question completely, but your question wasn't entirely complete either. I cannot answer this further without first knowing how they are grown. If you wish, you can reply and tell me which variety you are growing and whether it is indoor or outdoor, I can give you a pretty exact time frame of what to expect! Let me know.

Thanks, Nick Baker

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