Can you run Windows on Mac with Apple's M1 chip?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Sarah Ryan



Can you run Windows on Mac with Apple's M1 chip?

No.

Apple killed Boot Camp. Therefore, it is not possible to run Windows natively on M1-based Macs (unless Microsoft intervenes in what is less likely).

Speaking of running Windows on VM, none of the virtualization software is ready to run Windows on M1. Rosetta 2 cannot translate virtualization softwares correctly (yes, Apple lied to the face; many softwares will break; forget about performance reduction, they will BREAK). Parallels is working on a version for M1 to add support for Windows.

So, if you believe in an open ecosystem (but like Apple hardware), rush to buy Intel-based Macs right away. You can at

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No.

Apple killed Boot Camp. Therefore, it is not possible to run Windows natively on M1-based Macs (unless Microsoft intervenes in what is less likely).

Speaking of running Windows on VM, none of the virtualization software is ready to run Windows on M1. Rosetta 2 cannot translate virtualization softwares correctly (yes, Apple lied to the face; many softwares will break; forget about performance reduction, they will BREAK). Parallels is working on a version for M1 to add support for Windows.

So, if you believe in an open ecosystem (but like Apple hardware), rush to buy Intel-based Macs right away. You can always buy M1-based Macs in the future, but this is your last chance to get first-hand Intel-based Macs.

From now on, the answer is an absolute "no".

Apple has directly stated that Boot Camp is dead. Also, virtualization applications such as Parallels will not run an x86 guest operating system on Rosetta 2.

Therefore, the answer is no.

Microsoft could, if it wanted, make a version of Windows for ARM that runs on Apple Silicon. It's hard to see why they would.

Not currently.

However, I think it's worth thinking about having a separate Windows machine instead, or a cloud machine, if that's what you need to do. You are not going to use it full time, so take advantage of it.

(Yes, this is a problem if you really need to run an Intel virtual machine on your laptop. If that's the case, you want a high-end machine, anyway. Take the 16 ″ MacBook Pro with a high-end Intel processor. tall, he's a beast, and that's ideal for him).

No, that's not possible. Maybe it could work with a VM emulator like DOSBOX, but that wouldn't work with current Windows. I'm not sure about software like VirtualBox.

Bootcamp is not supported and there is no Windows 10 support for Apple hardware at this time (although Windows 10 has ARM as Paul points out)

This may be why Apple still has an Intel Mac Mini in its lineup.

Because the answer is no. Someone will probably come up with a software emulation environment, but its performance will suck.

So if running Windows is a requirement to break the deal for you, stick with Intel for now.

Not right now. However, VMware and Parallels are already working on virtualization options through updates. Microsoft is also developing its own ARM implementation. It's unclear whether native ARM Windows will run easily, but you can expect virtual options in the near future.

Yes, it can! You can install a virtual machine as Virtual Desktop and install and run Windows there. Bootcamp is not available for Apple Silicon (ARM-based Macs), and may not return anymore.

If you are referring to Windows 10 on ARM that remains to be seen ... this is a first round of devices released by Apple and I am sure that over time, depending on feedback and demand, Apple could release something on the bootcamp lines

No not yet. But a version of Parallels for M1 is in the works:

Parallels M1 Mac support in development as Big Sur update arrives - 9to5Mac

so the answer is: wait.

As of this writing, it is unlikely. The M1 chip has a completely different processor architecture than Intel / AMD. And as of this writing, there are no virtualizations, but Parallels is said to be working on one.

The benchmarks cited by Franklin Veaux seemed suspiciously high to me, so I asked my brother about it. He's an electrical engineer who works on CPU design and he really knows what he's doing.

He said that technically, yes, the M1 is much faster, but only because Apple's laptops use passive cooling. Assuming only passive cooling, energy efficiency is speed, since processor speed is thermally limited. Intel's x86 CPU is designed for active cooling, so of course it will grill your bacon in a passively cooled environment. For Apple use cases (small compact laptops), the M1 is dramatic

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The benchmarks cited by Franklin Veaux seemed suspiciously high to me, so I asked my brother about it. He's an electrical engineer who works on CPU design and he really knows what he's doing.

He said that technically, yes, the M1 is much faster, but only because Apple's laptops use passive cooling. Assuming only passive cooling, energy efficiency is speed, since processor speed is thermally limited. Intel's x86 CPU is designed for active cooling, so of course it will grill your bacon in a passively cooled environment. For Apple use cases (small compact laptops), the M1 is dramatically faster, but it will still lose to the x86 if placed in an actively cooled desktop environment.

As for integrated graphics that outperform mid-range GPUs; that's total nonsense on all metrics except maybe for video transcoding (watching, recording, or converting video formats). The GTX 1050 Ti (released in 2016) that Apple is proud to beat only counts as an entry-level GPU, not a mid-range. Four years ago it was mid-range, but four years is a long time in the world of computer hardware. A modern mid-range GPU would be something like the GTX 1650 Ti, which drastically outperforms Apple's M1 (second row vs. third row):

Note: This benchmark was made with Apple hardware emulating x86 instructions on its ARM processor, a minor drawback. There is no apples to apples comparison for these benchmarks because the x86 benchmark would have to be completely revised to run natively on ARM, at which point it's not really the same benchmark, right ?

It's easy to find laptops containing a GTX 1650 Ti for $ 1,300, the same price as an Apple MacBook.

In short, if you want graphics processing power and don't mind the bulky form factor, low battery life, and noisy fans, then you can beat the Apple M1 in CPU and GPU processing power and with an Intel CPU. and ordinary Nvidia. GPU gaming laptop.

However, if portability, battery life, and quiet operation are important to you, then Apple's M1 is leaps and bounds in efficient microprocessor technology.

Appendix:

If Apple's M1 were to use its built-in NN processor to super-sample like Nvidia's DLSS does, it could further improve its performance by rendering lower resolution images and realistically scaling them with Machine Learning. I couldn't confirm whether or not they do something like this in their current render channel.

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