Can you really get a development job without a degree?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Oliver Kaur



Can you really get a development job without a degree?

Yes, but that was in 1998 and there was a big tech boom. Honestly, I'm not sure what the prospects are now. I would say that with a resume that includes previous work experience and / or some significant open source contribution, you would have a good shot at a fight.

If you conduct the interview and find that you cannot answer certain questions, stop the interview, make a note of those questions, and don't fall asleep until you have solid answers. Follow up and let them know that you appreciate the opportunity and that you were glad you learned something new.

Getting a job without the proper title is not uncommon these days. As we can see some people drop out of college, some start their own businesses based on their programming and technology skills and ideas, some are even hired while on their internships while in college for full time roles or some even work at home / university without completing the degree. Then one can understand that the most important thing to get a job is the ability and talent that one has.

Programming is one of the most sought after skills today and programming experience results in a high-growth career.

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Getting a job without the proper title is not uncommon these days. As we can see some people drop out of college, some start their own businesses based on their programming and technology skills and ideas, some are even hired while on their internships while in college for full time roles or some even work at home / university without completing the degree. Then one can understand that the most important thing to get a job is the ability and talent that one has.

Programming is one of the most sought after skills today and programming experience results in a high-growth career.

The world is currently on the internet giving way to so many websites and web applications. The Web has replaced the concept of the distant world to bring everything closer together. Whether it's shopping or entertainment or communication or work related, the Internet and the web have a solution for everything and a way to improve this world.

With new technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things and Big Data emerging as the main research topic, but all this will depend on the Internet and the Web. So if someone masters the web technology best suited to handle all of this, they can sustain and grow at unprecedented growth.

Based on current trends, software engineering is one of the main features used in the IT and software industry. Getting a job anywhere is no piece of cake. As an ever-changing rule of thumb in the world, you have to be skilled and passionate enough to impress others and land a job. First of all, your goal should be to understand the market trend and also your ambition to choose a career.

So if you have the talent and ability, you can prove it by presenting a project actually done by you that can validate your learning and knowledge in a much better way than certificates. Many companies now prefer them to certificates as they assign some homework or assignment to test applicants' actual skill. There are many coding contests that companies recruit based on performance. So certification is just a physical test of doing it, but actual skills are what will always be used to achieve it.

Some of the job roles you can choose for a better career path are:

  1. Android Developer: In this current era where most of the technology and applications have moved to mobiles and smartphones. This has led to an increase in demand for Android developers in general, from large corporations to startups and even government organizations.
  2. Web Developer: The widespread use of the Internet has led to an increase in the use of websites and web applications. MEAN Stack developers, frontend developers, and NodeJS developers are in high demand in terms of growth and salary opportunities offered to them.
  3. Data Scientist - Data scientists are responsible for analyzing data with the goal of uncovering insights that, in turn, can provide a competitive advantage or address an urgent business problem. Their role is to analyze data from different angles, determine what it means, and then recommend ways to apply that data. They are considered "the sexiest job of the 21st century".

According to the current scenario, jobs are mainly present in the information technology industry. The IT industry is now flooded with startups and startups with new and positive energies. The primary focus of these companies is to hire the right talent with the right skill set based on their technology framework and stack.

Based on recent trends, you can see the technologies most in demand by these companies.

edWisor is one such platform that offers a combination of live and online training on your chosen IT career path from professionals with industry experience.

There are also over 100 companies that are hiring edWisor-trained candidates as full-time interns / positions.

Can you get a good job as a software developer without a degree? I live in Hungary and I would like to go. I want to spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job. It's possible?

I am at a point in my life where I have to decide what to do next.

I'm finishing high school (after a few detours; I'm 21) this year and will be starting a software engineering degree this fall. The problem is that I don't want to. I live in Hungary and I would like to leave this place. So I started thinking that maybe I could spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hop.

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Can you get a good job as a software developer without a degree? I live in Hungary and I would like to go. I want to spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job. It's possible?

I am at a point in my life where I have to decide what to do next.

I'm finishing high school (after a few detours; I'm 21) this year and will be starting a software engineering degree this fall. The problem is that I don't want to. I live in Hungary and I would like to leave this place. So I started thinking that maybe I could spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job elsewhere. But most job openings specifically list a qualification or equivalent work experience as a requirement.

I have never worked in the field, not even as a freelancer and I only started programming a few months ago. I have not written anything great either.

And now that?

This is a case of "yes, but ..." and I would like to dig a little deeper in your comments here, because I think this is important in this case.

I already mentioned it: it is possible, but every company that hires a developer runs the risk of hiring the wrong one with the result of losing (maybe a lot) of money. A wrong decision when creating software can easily cost a business a 6-digit figure. Therefore, you must have a compelling case as to why you, the one without a degree, should be hired.

The most compelling answer you can offer is the code you have written, which is good. But as you mentioned: you have just started in that field, you are inexperienced and I highly doubt that you can offer something that has a decent value in 6 months. So if I were the owner of the company, I doubt that you can convince me with just that.

It's easy to get a job when you've been writing code since you were a teenager, because you always showed passion for it, but to be honest, your CV doesn't sound like that to me. This reduces your chances of actually finding a job.

What you could get is some position as an apprentice. For example, in Germany there is something called “Ausbildung”, which is an internship system that includes work-related schools and exams + a certification if you pass it after three years. Something like this you can get for example in Germany (assuming you speak enough German, which would be a requirement).

Another point to keep in mind is that developers with a degree often earn better salaries than developers without a degree.

If it's just about getting out of Hungary, I wonder why you don't try to start at some university abroad. So what you are currently doing is exchanging a very safe path with a very unsafe one. Maybe you will reevaluate your options and add a few more details about what your real goals are. The path you want to take is very difficult and without people to guide you I don't think you can reach a decent level.

Yes.

I fall into this category: my BA is in Economics, not in Computer Science. Now I lead a team at a company in New York that creates financial software.

I think the hardest step is finding the FIRST job. In my case, I was lucky that Hyland Software (in my home state of Ohio) took a risk by hiring someone with no formal training. Thanks Miguel and Bob!

Now, this is not to say that you have not programmed. In fact, I was fortunate to have grown up with computers at home and a patient father willing to help me with my projects. But the journey from amateur to professional

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Yes.

I fall into this category: my BA is in Economics, not in Computer Science. Now I lead a team at a company in New York that creates financial software.

I think the hardest step is finding the FIRST job. In my case, I was lucky that Hyland Software (in my home state of Ohio) took a risk by hiring someone with no formal training. Thanks Miguel and Bob!

Now, this is not to say that you have not programmed. In fact, I was fortunate to have grown up with computers at home and a patient father willing to help me with my projects. But the journey from hobbyist to professional involves a lot of self-directed study.

Fortunately, we've never had a better time when it comes to the availability of free resources for aspiring programmers. All you need is a cheap computer and an internet connection and you are well on your way.

It would also be helpful to have a mentor - someone who is a professional in the field who can answer some of the questions you may have along the way. Many programmers I know are very generous people who would be willing to help if asked.

One last thing: just because you don't have an education in the formal sense doesn't mean you shouldn't learn the fundamentals of computer science. I have come across many people who can improvise a work schedule and who actually have little understanding of how things work.

Don't be this person: dig deep. Find out how operating systems work. Fight for core issues like data structures and algorithms. Apply them too; You only get better by DOING. Knowing a particular web framework will only get you so far. Someone who really understands the fundamentals is much more valuable.

I recently told someone that when it comes to being a self-taught programmer, I think the most important trait is curiosity. If you don't mind not knowing how something works, that's fine. Now go find out how it works!

Good luck!

If you are wondering if you can get a job at Google without a degree, then yes; Google never needed staff to have degrees, it did a lot of the degrees they got, where they went to school, and even what their grade point average was.

If you can show your skills and knowledge in an interview on Google, then your title will not be questioned. Google needs skill, confidence, and a student, and this is not determined by your college degree.

If you have work experience in the position you are applying for on Google, then your work experience will tell you everything you need.

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If you are wondering if you can get a job at Google without a degree, then yes; Google never needed staff to have degrees, it did a lot of the degrees they got, where they went to school, and even what their grade point average was.

If you can show your skills and knowledge in an interview on Google, then your title will not be questioned. Google needs skill, confidence, and a student, and this is not determined by your college degree.

If you have work experience in the position you are applying for at Google, then your work experience will tell you everything that is good for you for Google in that position. You must be confident and speak and share experiences without hesitation. This is sure to help you get a job at Google, whether you have a degree or not.

You need to have some achievements and work experiences to stand out from the other interviewees. Because there are many people who apply for the job on Google. So you need something different from them; It can be your experience, achievements, certificates, or a degree. Along with these, you must have good interpersonal skills as it can help you excel as well.

People assumed that the use of universities as a "proxy" was successful. However, the shortcut left decent staff behind without degrees, and it became clear that this would be a problem, both in terms of finding enough truly exceptional people and expanding the company's diversity of views and responses to problems. As a result, Google's focus has changed.

Instead of focusing on "substitutes," the emphasis now is on figuring out what you can do directly. Any job advertisement that mentions a specific standard of education now includes a word like "or comparable practical knowledge." How can you determine what is "equivalent"?

Looking at your resume to see what you have actually done with your career, asking you to explain how you come up with explanations of your work, and asking you questions to see how deep your background is and how you perform.

That doesn't make it easier to get into Google, but it does mean that there is no longer an arbitrary entry limit that depends on a college degree.

According to Google, there is no prerequisite for a degree or prior experience, as is the case for other technical qualifications. In fact, 61% of enrolled students do not have a four-year degree. These certificates and certifications would aid in the reselling and continuing education needed in the technology industry.

So be confident, don't hesitate to speak up, gain experience in the field you are applying for, and show off your skills and abilities.

Good luck! Just keep trying.

Dear Job Applicant,

I have employed many people and a title is not very high on my priority list. Actually, as a business consultant, I found that people with practical experience were better candidates than those with college degrees. I live in Atlanta and went to several of the best schools looking for quality business consultant candidates. I found several people who looked good on paper, but after interviewing the candidates I realized that they knew nothing about business in the real world. Some students had a business concept, while others did not remember their information.

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Dear Job Applicant:

I have employed many people and a title is not very high on my priority list. Actually, as a business consultant, I found that people with practical experience were better candidates than those with college degrees. I live in Atlanta and went to several of the best schools looking for quality business consultant candidates. I found several people who looked good on paper, but after interviewing the candidates I realized that they knew nothing about business in the real world. Some students had a business concept, while others did not remember the information from the last two classes they took because they learned enough to pass the tests and stored it in their short-term memory. I invested a year in training each candidate for each selection in an internship capacity and then gave them the opportunity to be hired as junior consultants. Once hired, they were hired as consultants, but they still had to build practical experiences before they could actually be viable consultants. Although I built excellent relationships with my employees, I probably would have seen better results by hiring an experienced non-degree entrepreneur who knew how to do it.

Two business owners I know:
Both business owners run multi-million dollar companies, but both do not have a college degree. In fact, one of them didn't even graduate from high school. (She had to drop out of school to help her family with household expenses.)
The other went to college for half a semester and is now one of the richest men in his entire region. If you look at most successful business owners, you will find a common thread: they
all dropped out of college.
Famous entrepreneurs who accidentally dropped out of school

1. Bill Gates
2. Steve Jobs
3. Michael Dell
4. Mark Zuckerberg

Other notable figures

1. Frank Lloyd Wright
2. Buckminster Fuller
3. James Cameron
4. Tom Hanks
5. Harrision Ford
6. Tiger Woods

My conclusion: a title is important to the point that it really matters. Please understand that I loved college and strongly believe in institutions of higher education. The fact is that having obtained a degree does not guarantee success in the world. Vice versa, not having a degree does not condemn you to a life of poverty and anguish. The point is that talent is talent, genius is genius, and drive is drive. If you have any of the three in large proportion, then it really doesn't matter what kind of degree you hold.

Here are some ideas on how to get a job:

1. Enter Sales: Trust me, there are many companies that will give you the opportunity to do it in sales.
Step 1: Get out there today and apply to all the jobs that interest you that are sales positions.
Step 2: Wait a few days and you will see the calls start coming in. If they don't come right away, show them that you can sell. Call them and sell yourself until you get the interview.

Step 3: Once you get the interview, learn all you can about the company. Learn about its mission, founders, customers, products, and the company's vision for the future. I promise you, if you come in with this amount of information, you will most likely be hired on the spot. And if they don't call me.

Good luck and make it happen.

JR McNair

My degree is in mathematics.

I work as a web developer / devops engineer.

Programming / infrastructure has been a hobby of mine since I was about 11 years old. I worked as a freelancer for a few years in middle / high school and quit when I started at my new college. I kept up to date and created things to solve my own problems, but I wasn't doing it on a professional level.

In every serious job, I found myself using my programming skills to some degree, so when the time came when I needed to look for a different job, I knew what that job would be.

Due to my experience, I get a lot of questions about

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My degree is in mathematics.

I work as a web developer / devops engineer.

Programming / infrastructure has been a hobby of mine since I was about 11 years old. I worked as a freelancer for a few years in middle / high school and quit when I started at my new college. I kept up to date and created things to solve my own problems, but I wasn't doing it on a professional level.

In every serious job, I found myself using my programming skills to some degree, so when the time came when I needed to look for a different job, I knew what that job would be.

Due to my experience, I get a lot of questions about how I claim to have so much knowledge or experience when “You've only been a teacher / injury prevention specialist / tutor” and then I have to go through my background. Then they say "professional" experience and I have to explain that I have published many websites, but looking at all the URLs I can remember, it seems that they are no longer in use, or that they no longer reflect my work (which after more than 10 years I hope they didn't!).

They then ask me programming questions, and I tend to do pretty good at them because I've run into some really obscure use case scenario issues, and I was pretty active on StackOverflow, so I had kind of a quantifiable benchmark as far as my knowledge group. .

It wasn't easy, but apparently I made a good impression on my boss and the rest of the team when I interviewed because I was offered my position the moment they finished interviewing the last two candidates.

I could give 100 one-sentence answers to this question, but I'll limit myself to ten.

1. Be very good at what you do and fit in perfectly with what a company is looking for. Businesses primarily look at past success, and if you have clear measurable success with evidence, serious entrepreneurs will seriously consider it.

2. Start in an entry-level position that a college-educated person would pass up WHILE giving you exposure to both top-level executives and skills that are transferable. I was born in Hollywood, California, and I've been listening my whole life

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I could give 100 one-sentence answers to this question, but I'll limit myself to ten.

1. Be very good at what you do and fit in perfectly with what a company is looking for. Businesses primarily look at past success, and if you have clear measurable success with evidence, serious entrepreneurs will seriously consider it.

2. Start in an entry-level position that a college-educated person would pass up WHILE giving you exposure to both top-level executives and skills that are transferable. I was born in Hollywood, California, and I've been hearing all my life about how useful "starting in the mailroom" was because I ended up seeing executives often. With email, this is more difficult, but there are still equivalents. The movie Swimming With Sharks, produced by Cineville, a company for which he used to be the chief financial officer, is an introduction to the dark comedy about this. Watch and learn.

3. Take a job with a fancy title in a small business, if it's a completely different industry than you have a lot of experience, and do it for a little compensation, so you can get a track record, even for a few months, and then fill the experience gap on your resume. Did you see how I mentioned the name in point 2, about being a CFO? That was setting up this point. "Putting a pipe" is what comedians call this. Writers call it omen.

4. Do a great volunteer job and get good press coverage. Nonprofits always need help making a difference, and you can do a lot to develop leadership and management skills.

5. Write a book. Write a nonfiction book that requires massive research, test a hypothesis, and come up with something new and useful. Be the world expert in a new and / or narrow area that you can comfortably predict will be important in the future.

6. Make a movie. It may be short, but it should be of high quality, and it is best if it presents it to you on camera, explaining a solution to a problem. If I wanted to get a job at IBM, I would make a mini-documentary on Watson and how it is used.

7. Go on television as a credible expert. I've been on the Science Channel over 100 times in the last year (see Futurescape with James Woods and Alien Encounters 3), and I've been on TV over 800 times since 1999. This is very useful for a business. Some companies have been getting free reputation-enhancing advertising for years, and generally, unless a person has been on television before, it's hard for producers to risk putting a newbie on the air.

8. Run a Kickstarter that is successful and fully funded, that all promises are kept, and introduce a product or service that is relevant to the products or services of the company you want to work for. For example, if you want to work for SpaceX, get a funded Kickstarter rocket blasting off.

9. Organize conferences in an emerging technology area. I hosted 108 laptop fashion shows and more than a dozen international IPv6 summits, meeting with executives from hundreds of companies and government agencies, any of which I could have applied to later.

10. Become an entrepreneur. Put together a great business plan or platform, raise money, create a product or service, take it to market, hire a great team, and sell the business to Google, Facebook, SpaceX, Tesla, IBM, or whatever company you want. The sale will usually come with what you asked for in the question: a job!

Good luck putting one or more of these to work for you and landing your dream job!

It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. Would mean and

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It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. It would mean that you remained curious, focused, driven by results, and most importantly, you didn't waste it all on something destructive. You always kept your eyes on a higher goal.

So that's what employers are looking for in the people they hire. They seek, in a word, PASSION and PROOF OF PASSION.

You can do it! Forget about excuses, show people your PROOF OF PASSION and the world will open its doors to you.

Good luck.

It's probably a lot harder these days than it was when I did it in the early '70s. But some people (like Mark Tanner) still hire developers based on what they can do, rather than on paper. (A degree is no guarantee that you have really learned anything. Just look at the most famous recently graduated in Economics who thought that the importing country paid export duties directly to the exporting country which, of course, is silly - users final sources are the ultimate source of rights, both import and export).

It used to be that you could get a coding job for $ 100k / year if you could spell Computer Science without making more than two misspellings. Those days are gone.

These days resumes are sorted by software that searches for keywords that are in the job description, such as "Bachelor of Computer Science, Mathematics, or similar" with a list of possible titles as "similar" in the software. If you don't have it on your resume, it's placed in the "don't bother to read" folder.

This is why you will also see job descriptions with conflicting technologies listed, such as Angular and Node.js or Java and C #.

If you read

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It used to be that you could get a coding job for $ 100k / year if you could spell Computer Science without making more than two misspellings. Those days are gone.

These days resumes are sorted by software that searches for keywords that are in the job description, such as "Bachelor of Computer Science, Mathematics, or similar" with a list of possible titles as "similar" in the software. If you don't have it on your resume, it's placed in the "don't bother to read" folder.

This is why you will also see job descriptions with conflicting technologies listed, such as Angular and Node.js or Java and C #.

If you read a job description and it has a title listed as "required", you are not going through verification software.

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