Can you get a job without smiling in an interview? Would an employer hire someone who never really smiled during the interview?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Raelynn Crane



Can you get a job without smiling in an interview? Would an employer hire someone who never really smiled during the interview?

I am not a human resources person, but I have been on interview panels several times. Something that I pay a lot of attention to is body language. The lack of smiles during an interview would certainly not be a point in your favor, however, it is not all about that. It's more about what your body language changes in response to a question. I know some delightfully passionate people who just don't smile. But other aspects of their body language change when they get excited about something. They may alter your posture or increase your eye contact.

That said, you're going to have a lot of pe

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I am not a human resources person, but I have been on interview panels several times. Something that I pay a lot of attention to is body language. The lack of smiles during an interview would certainly not be a point in your favor, however, it is not all about that. It's more about what your body language changes in response to a question. I know some delightfully passionate people who just don't smile. But other aspects of their body language change when they get excited about something. They may alter your posture or increase your eye contact.

That being said, you're going to have a ton of people who just think you don't care or aren't interested. Every interviewer is different and your subjectivity will drive the result.

If you are just not a smiling person, show your interest and worth in other ways. Probably my only other advice would be that most people can read the room during an interview. If you get to the middle or even the end of the interview and you don't feel like you've connected with the panel and it doesn't look right, then talk about it. You don't have to say "I'm not smiling." When you get to the point where they ask if you have any questions for them, highlight your passion and desire for the job. Smile with your words and other body language, you could turn it all around!

I can tell if he was interviewing someone and he didn't smile once. He probably wouldn't give them a chance.

I consider myself a funny person and I usually do jokes on my own to reduce tension. If someone is sitting in front of me without smiling. I'll assume they don't think I'm funny or have no sense of humor.

Mostly joking aside, although most people think I'm funny.

¿Why is it so important? Because my company culture is not a corporate culture without fun. I want to be around funny and funny people. An interview is not meant to be a terrible experience and if

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I can tell if he was interviewing someone and he didn't smile once. He probably wouldn't give them a chance.

I consider myself a funny person and I usually do jokes on my own to reduce tension. If someone is sitting in front of me without smiling. I'll assume they don't think I'm funny or have no sense of humor.

Mostly joking aside, although most people think I'm funny.

¿Why is it so important? Because my company culture is not a corporate culture without fun. I want to be around funny and funny people. An interview is not meant to be a terrible experience and if someone gives the impression that they are not having fun, lack a sense of humor or are simply not a happy person. They would not be a good fit for my company.

I'm surprised no one said the obvious, that it depends on the job.

Are you applying for a job as a bodyguard or head of security? Not smiling is probably okay or even a good thing.

Don't you smile when you apply for a job as a Hooter's waitress or an NFL cheerleader? You probably won't get the job.

In between, it's probably not an instant disqualifier, but it wouldn't be good for most people.

There is also the question of how difficult a job is and what qualifications are needed. If a world-renowned research neurosurgeon applies for a hospital job, they'll probably worry less

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I'm surprised no one said the obvious, that it depends on the job.

Are you applying for a job as a bodyguard or head of security? Not smiling is probably okay or even a good thing.

Don't you smile when you apply for a job as a Hooter's waitress or an NFL cheerleader? You probably won't get the job.

In between, it's probably not an instant disqualifier, but it wouldn't be good for most people.

There is also the question of how difficult a job is and what qualifications are needed. If a world-renowned research neurosurgeon applies for a hospital job, they will likely be less concerned with your facial expressions than someone applying for a less prestigious job.

I'm just curious why you asked the question. What is to be gained by not smiling in an interview? Even if you were in an interview for a position as a bodyguard or head of security, as someone else mentioned, I can't believe a total poker face would benefit you that much.

I would like to know that an applicant has a touch of humanity, doesn't it?

Yes, of course.

But there are reasons why you don't want to sound harsh. You improve your chances by appearing calm and / or happy.

Nobody wants to hire someone sour or severe.

Over the past year, I have trained over 150 working students and professionals from Europe, North America, South America, and Asia on how to prepare for interviews to land their dream job. Many of them have landed jobs in large companies with a market valuation in the billions, while others have landed jobs in small, fast-growing start-ups.

Here are my top 10 tips on how to prepare for your first interview:

  1. Take Advantage of Creative Assets: Most interviewers bring a cover letter and a copy of their resume. Don't be the majority of people. Go further and show the interviewer how much you want
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Over the past year, I have trained over 150 working students and professionals from Europe, North America, South America, and Asia on how to prepare for interviews to land their dream job. Many of them have landed jobs in large companies with a market valuation in the billions, while others have landed jobs in small, fast-growing start-ups.

Here are my top 10 tips on how to prepare for your first interview:

  1. Take Advantage of Creative Assets: Most interviewers bring a cover letter and a copy of their resume. Don't be the majority of people. Go the extra mile and show the interviewer how much you want this job. How do you do that? Two words: creative assets. For example, you could create a 10-slide PowerPoint presentation on how you are going to impact your business as a digital marketer. That deck could highlight your goals, the 30, 60, 90 day plan, your skills, and more. Best of all, it should be tailored based on the company goals and job responsibilities of the position you are applying for. This will help show the company that you really want the job and that you are willing to go the extra mile to prove it. Need help creating creative assets? I wrote a best-selling book (over 40,000 Kindle copies) on how Matt Epstein did this and got 80 interview offers. You can get a free copy here if it helps!
  2. Learn about the interviewer: If you know who your interviewer will be in advance, look him up on LinkedIn and Google and find out as much as possible about him. For example, if you read my LinkedIn profile, you will see that I am passionate about helping start-ups and that could be a great topic for building rapport. Or maybe you noticed that I am a UCLA Bruin and also went to UCLA. That could also be another relationship building topic.
  3. Learn How To Use Callbacks - This is a tool that comedians use, where they refer to an old joke they previously told on their stand up. I'm not telling you to tell jokes, of course. What I'm telling you is that it can be very effective to reference or summarize the important talking points discussed earlier in the interview. For example, if the interviewer tells you about 3 key things that you are looking for in a new hire, you could potentially refer to them later in the discussion. It shows that you are actively listening and keen enough to remember important talking points.
  4. Practice a lot. Practice with a friend or family member in a role play. Practice using flash cards. Practice in front of the mirror. Here's a pro tip: Usually in most of your interviews, you'll find that there is a very common set of questions the interviewer will ask, such as "Why do you want for this company?" And you need to be really prepared with a well thought out, personalized response. Not sure what questions will be asked? Don't worry, I (along with the help of an HR expert from a Fortune 100 company) wrote a 500 guide to the top interview questions and answers for you here.
  5. Do your research - What is the mission of the company? What is the company culture like? What are the products or services offered by the company? Who is on the leadership team? What are the job responsibilities? How well is the company doing financially? If you don't know the answers to these types of questions, start your research. Now.
  6. The 15-minute early rule: I once had an amazing manager at Cisco who taught me this great lesson: Arriving 15 minutes early for a meeting is being on time. Make sure you have a buffer so you don't risk being late for your interview. You definitely don't want to rush to the interview and arrive out of breath. After all, you want to make a great first impression, right?
  7. Remember to breathe: When I started interviewing, I was super nervous. I was so afraid of failing and that was reflected in my interviews. He spoke very fast and often rushed to answer the question. Here's a secret I wish someone would tell me when I started: You don't always have to respond right away. Slow down, take a breath, and really take time to reflect on your answer to the question. And even if you don't know the answer, remember that it's okay to say ...
  8. I don't know, get ready to say it. If you don't know the answer, don't pretend you do. People will often read it well.
  9. Learn how to send a follow-up note - Whether it's an email, video, or even a shared screen recording, be sure to send a highly personalized follow-up "note" to the interviewer to let them know how you're going to deliver value to the company. For example, you can highlight the top 3 ways you will be awesome in the workplace.
  10. Remember to enjoy the ride - you are on your way to your dream job, so take a moment to appreciate each step. High five with your friend who helps you with the interview role play. Make a punch after squashing your interview. Because you know what The journey is the best part.

We wish you all the best,

Nelson

These are out of memory and are the biggest issues, many of them also exhibited many issues that would not trigger a red light recommendation, but when combined with the big ones they add up to a "no hire" recommendation. Note that these are "do not hire" recommendations, not people who were not hired due to a declined offer or were not offered a position due to more than one acceptable candidate.

  1. Communication would have been a problem. (Heavily accented, reticent English)
  2. He had no track record demonstrating the required skills, when assessed in problem solving and quality control analytical skills, fai
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These are out of memory and are the biggest issues, many of them also exhibited many issues that would not trigger a red light recommendation, but when combined with the big ones they add up to a "no hire" recommendation. Note that these are "do not hire" recommendations, not people who were not hired due to a declined offer or were not offered a position due to more than one acceptable candidate.

  1. Communication would have been a problem. (Heavily accented, reticent English)
  2. He had no background demonstrating the required skills, when tested on problem solving and QA analytical skills, he failed to demonstrate technical knowledge and attention to detail.
  3. Prima Donna too arrogant and would never have stayed long at a company that wasn't geared towards the latest .com fashions and keep it fun.
  4. The resume was very good, but when asked about the skills listed as "A +", the candidate demonstrated a "D" level of knowledge.
  5. Too quiet. He would not have been an entrepreneur or able to work independently.
  6. Too stubborn, haughty. Very much like "I have a lot of complaints and I want everyone to hear them." Not a good fit for a company that has stained cubicles from 20 years ago and a boss who didn't want to hear it.
  7. He was unable to demonstrate a solid understanding of web technologies and object-oriented programming (advanced skills, phone screen would have eliminated basic skills).
  8. He was asked about remote job openings and proceeded to try to convince / explain to us that there is no reason not to have work from home several days a week.
  9. You answered a "greatness and weakness" question (asked by a co-worker) with the truth.
  10. Boy scout. We are often ordered to implement unsafe practices and cut expenses at this company I worked for (think unencrypted credit card numbers or obscure security). As a developer my job is to make sure the product manager / owners (to the extent they don't want to hear you) understand the risks of what you have chosen and implement based on the final call. You could say that this candidate would have resigned instead of implementing something that put millions of credit card numbers at risk and would not have been a good fit for the culture. And yes, you could argue that the rest of us should have quit and saved our souls too, but we are talking about a job market that is over 50% South Asian (Desi) developers,

Here is the answer I wrote for a word that will not be used: Arun SM's response to What was the longest interview you've had that led to rejection?

Another answer, to explain what to avoid when preparing for interviews: Arun SM's answer to Why am I doing poorly in interviews even though I am technically strong?

What are those other things that you should never use?

  • Stop saying lies. Yes, the interviewer can catch you right away if you are lying to them.
  • Stop using I's unless you are about to count the things you did on your own entirely. "I did it", "It is only possible because of me", "I am" in your answers
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Here is the answer I wrote for a word that will not be used: Arun SM's response to What was the longest interview you've had that led to rejection?

Another answer, to explain what to avoid when preparing for interviews: Arun SM's answer to Why am I doing poorly in interviews even though I am technically strong?

What are those other things that you should never use?

  • Stop saying lies. Yes, the interviewer can catch you right away if you are lying to them.
  • Stop using I's unless you are about to count the things you did on your own entirely. "I did it", "It is only possible thanks to me", "I am" in your answers this shows selfishness. Using words like "We did it", "We could", "Good team support" shows that you are involved and listening to others.
  • Stop bragging about yourself. Never say those things written on your resume when asked about you. Explain things like experience at your previous company, explain what it was like to work with the previous team, explain your learnings from last year, repeating things on the resume does not help you understand it better.
  • Never check your previous job or boss. It's an interview for your next job, not the interrogation or confession room. You can say quite safely that the current organization does not provide you with a platform to work in the XYZ area that you are interviewing for.

Here are some typical questions that are asked in almost every interview (the way these questions are asked can be modified, but the answer will remain similar):

Q: How long are you waiting for this position?

Bad answer: I expect XXXX and additional benefits, if any.

Good answer: I don't know how much you earn for a similar role in the organization. What is the offer that a person with ABC, XYZ skills receives?

Alternative answer: From my research, I am sure that the organization justifies my position. I expect an increase of XYZ% in my current salary, please propose a figure to reach (say current numbers when asked | not necessary to be true).

Q: Do you work in a team or collaborate individually?

Bad answer: I want to test every instance of my career and show what my ability is, so I don't like to share my work with others.

Good answer: I have demonstrated the ability to work independently, it is necessary to work in a team although I work independently. Working as a team in a collaborative effort can reduce the time required to complete a product.

Q: Did you come here for an interview because this organization is ranked above your current organization and we provide better facilities?

Bad answer: Yes, I want to contribute to make this organization more successful. I can't go to the third ranked organization below my current organization, it will not suit me. The only option for me was to approach your organization because I think I deserve better for this position.

Good answer: Changing organizations has nothing to do with their ranking, plus each organization has its own challenges to face, so I think comparing two organizations is not a good idea. The reason for seeking a new position is the exposure I need and the skill sets I have for the XYZ domain for which my current organization does not have the opportunity.

PS: Be as honest as possible when answering, giving wrong information and getting a job won't last long in the new position. It will give you a bad impression and you will have to see those faces that have lost confidence in you.

All the best for your interviews :)

If you are an expert (I mean a real expert) at reading body language, you can read how the interviewer reacts to your answers during the interview.

But keep in mind that for most employers, you will need to make a positive impression on most, if not all, of the entire interview list. The decision to hire or not to hire is not usually a single person. Key signs of positive interview body language include smiling (even a small smile), eye contact (although many interviewers are bending over during the interview to take notes, so this is usually only between questions), and postures (leaning towards you or lean toward you).

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If you are an expert (I mean a real expert) at reading body language, you can read how the interviewer reacts to your answers during the interview.

But keep in mind that for most employers, you will need to make a positive impression on most, if not all, of the entire interview list. The decision to hire or not to hire is not usually a single person. Key signs of positive interview body language include smiling (even a small smile), eye contact (although many interviewers are bending over during the interview to take notes, so this is usually only between questions), and postures (leaning towards you instead of leaning back). ).

Beyond body language, the type of question that is often asked is an indicator of how the interview is going. If the questions get progressively more difficult, it is NOT a bad thing, although many candidates feel that way. An experienced behavioral interviewer will delve into your examples, and the interview will become increasingly difficult.

However, if you fail the interview, the interviewer may back off and start asking you easier and easier questions. In some cases, the interviewer may even go off topic and talk about sports, the weather, or other non-work related topics. Although the candidate may think this is a good thing, as it seems more personal, it often means that the interviewer has simply given up on you and is not going to put you through more interview hells than you have already endured. So they free you from the hook, but they don't hire you either.

So be careful with the interview which is too easy. Yes, it could be a sign of a poorly prepared interviewer, but it's often a sign that you're just not in the running.

Another sign is when the interview lasts shorter than the planned period of time. Most of the interviewers on a list are required to fill their time on the schedule, so they can simply fill the time with easier or non-interview questions. But if the interviewer ends the interview early (which can be the case in early interviews, especially on campus interviews), it means that they have already made a decision, usually negatively.

Conversely, if the interview takes a long time and even keeps the next interviewer waiting, this is usually a very good sign, as hardly any interviewer will hold you back longer than planned unless they are genuinely interested in you as a candidate.

If you're not getting a good read from the interviewer and you want to actively find out where you stand at the end of the interview, use this question: "What would probably be my biggest challenge in this position?" If the interviewer talks about you directly in the position, you are still being considered. However, if the interviewer switches to third person ("The most difficult challenge for the person in this role ..."), it is an indicator that you are not the right person for the role. At least in the mind of that interviewer.

Remember that most hiring decisions are not made by one person. The direct reporting manager has the greatest weight in the decision, however it remains a collective decision with input from others. Therefore, it is quite possible to have a failed interview with one of the interviewers and still be hired. Also, if more than one department is interviewing you for multiple roles, you can possibly fail in one role, but get an offer for the other role. And, just to extend it further, sometimes a candidate will completely fail in the position they are interviewing for, but will then be recommended for a different position that is a better fit.

So even if you get an indicator that the interview is not going well, all is not lost. There are other interviewers, other roles, and other employers. Your job is to find the position that will be the best fit for both you and the employer. Interviewers are trying to do the same, so do your best to help with that two-way evaluation.

For more information on interviews, including sample answers to the Top 50 Interview Questions, visit Fifty Standard Interview Questions on CollegeGrad.com.

A2A.

It's not true that I know if I'm going to hire someone after 90 seconds. However, what is certain is that I, like everyone else, have a strong impression of the applicant in the first 90 seconds, much more than in any other 90 seconds of the interview, probably as much (or more) in the first 90 seconds. as in the rest of the interview, but more influential because it comes first.

I have worked for the last 30 years in the startup world, in high-tech industries, generally managing development, operations, or the entire company. In all these companies, hiring was a collective process, where one person

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A2A.

It's not true that I know if I'm going to hire someone after 90 seconds. However, what is certain is that I, like everyone else, have a strong impression of the applicant in the first 90 seconds, much more than in any other 90 seconds of the interview, probably as much (or more) in the first 90 seconds. as in the rest of the interview, but more influential because it comes first.

I have worked for the last 30 years in the startup world, in high-tech industries, generally managing development, operations, or the entire company. In all of these companies, hiring was a collective process, in which one person usually spends 2 rounds of interviews, with several qualified engineers and managers (or specialists in the domain of interest). The hiring decision is largely collective, where a consensus usually emerges. When there is no consensus, the discussion develops between the proponents of the candidate and those who believe that the candidate does not fit in. Finally, a decision arises. When there are strong vetoes, in most cases the applicant is not hired, even if advocates emerge. So the hiring decision is not made by one person.

As for each interviewer, he / she makes his / her own decisions during the interview process, then during post-interview discussions. I think I should have hired over a thousand high-level specialists in my career - hiring has always been one of my (and everyone's) top priorities from the beginning. I must have been on several thousand reports for interview candidates - I feel like most interviewers go through much of the same process. The first 90 seconds of the interview, form an impression of the candidate. It may take you the rest of the interview to change your mind if you do. I have heard so many times about both possibilities: the applicant was constant throughout the interview (in the interviewer's mind) and it was good or bad,

What this tells me, both from what I heard from others and from what I see in myself, is that it is true that a strong impression is formed in the first 90 seconds, but also that this strong impression can change in the course . of the interview. Looking back at my own recollections, I would suggest that the first impression remains between 70-80% of applicants I've interviewed, and that the rest of the interview voids it only 20-30% of the time.

One more thing to consider: less experienced interviewers are more sensitive to first impressions than experienced interviewers. We all become more capable of evaluating an applicant after a few years of interviews, and we are also more tolerant. So I would go so far as to say that the percentage I quoted (first impressions are true 70-80% of the time) is a higher number for less experienced interviewers.

At the same time, this first impression is, most of the time, only something positive or negative. It falls short of the level of assuring you that the applicant fits / doesn't fit the position. It makes you more or less inclined to consider the applicant, but it doesn't * validate * your decision in any way. He is still looking to show, throughout the interview, that this is the right person, he always hopes that is true, because he always wants to end the hiring, at least for that position ...

My conclusion, then, is that, for every interviewer you hire, a good part, but not all, of the decision is based on the first 90 seconds. IMHO, this first impression can be overridden for the rest of the interview, but it's strong, and overriding requires a fairly significant weight of evidence.

I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is
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I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is problematic because it is not clear that the interviewer is nicer to candidates who are doing well. It certainly wasn't. If anything, I was nicer to the candidates who were performing worse, because I felt bad for them.
  2. Difficulty / ease in solving problems (for technical / consulting roles / etc.). The problem with this is that it is not really about how many problems you have to solve a problem; it's about how many problems you have * relative * to other candidates. And, of course, you don't know how other candidates fared.


The only thing that could be an indicator is if:

  1. Good performance The interviewer is making a clear hard sell. And even then ... It is beneficial for you to think well of the company, even if you are rejected.
  2. Poor performance You have serious problems with a question, such as a complete and total freeze. That could put you squarely on the bottom of candidates even on a tough problem.


Basically, attempts to guess its performance will be slightly more accurate than random guesses. It is better to be optimistic and wait to find out what happened.

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