Can we easily get a job in New Zealand?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Zak Thomson



Can we easily get a job in New Zealand?

I'm a New Zealander and I used to be an IT recruitment consultant, working in a fairly specialized area. This made our clients more likely to sponsor suitable candidates. Some suggestions:

- The archaic English often used by candidates from foreign countries, and especially from India. This style will probably be grammatically correct, but it will sound a bit strange in New Zealand. Get your CV professionally rewritten by a New Zealand, Australia or UK based CV rewriting service. Americans will write your CV in a very boastful style, which works quite well in the US, but does NOT work at all in New Zealand. I

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I'm a New Zealander and I used to be an IT recruitment consultant, working in a fairly specialized area. This made our clients more likely to sponsor suitable candidates. Some suggestions:

- The archaic English often used by candidates from foreign countries, and especially from India. This style will probably be grammatically correct, but it will sound a bit strange in New Zealand. Get your CV professionally rewritten by a New Zealand, Australia or UK based CV rewriting service. Americans will write your CV in a very boastful style, which works quite well in the US, but does NOT work at all in New Zealand. I had mine rewritten and got a lot more phone calls.

- This old style of writing did not deter me from having a conversation about an opportunity with someone with the right experience. What did put me off was when I received a six-line CV, full of grammatical errors and ending with something like "please give me this job." I found it just sloppy and lazy; You seem unwilling to learn about the company, the requirements, and why you might be a good candidate. it almost sounds like begging.

- I disagree with those who say that you should Anglicize your name to avoid discrimination, although I do know Chinese and South Korean people who have Angled at least one name if foreigners find it difficult to pronounce it, for purely practical reasons.

- If you have friends or family who live in New Zealand, please include a valid New Zealand address on your CV. Most employers will not even consider the resumes of those who do not live there. Obviously, you will have to say that you are seeking sponsorship at an early stage if you get an interview, and perhaps say that you are abroad for a temporary period of time (and define exactly how long) due to family reasons.

- Recruiters often get more than 300 applications for each position, so they simply want to see a SHORT CV (four pages is the absolute maximum), which is purely factual - they are not interested in your empty claims of being a “dynamic individual”, or topics like “I can work well unsupervised, as well as in a team.” Occasionally, you can reference the part you paid in an achievement in the workplace, but only if you can demonstrate it on your CV You can briefly mention interests at the end of the CV: sports are good!

- New Zealand employers consider both your skills and your personality to be important factors for a good team fit. At the same time, American-style resumes would be poorly received there as well (as modesty is a MASSIVE virtue in New Zealand).

Others have noted some skill shortage there, and that the government has made it difficult for foreigners to get work in New Zealand. Focus on areas with a shortage, and it should be a lot easier.

- I also suggest that you send your CV to an accredited agency in New Zealand that specializes in your area of ​​work, but NOT for a specific vacancy. Send them an email telling them that you want to move to New Zealand and would appreciate their feedback on the format of your CV. Follow up with a phone call in a week. This way, you are likely to have a better chance of receiving personalized feedback, when agents are not so busy filtering hundreds of apps.

I believe that if you are between 17 and 40 years old, there are jobs available for those who are motivated to find them. As others have said, if you have a health problem (disability), the doors are a bit more difficult to open. Depending on your skills and qualifications, there are many jobs.

From ages 16 to 45, it was never difficult for me to find a suitable job, often with a view to advancement.

But once you turn 45, your prospects diminish. I have watched over 49 years in the workforce how times have changed. When I started as a young man, the management was all older workers, although slow to change, they rewarded loyalty and I

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I believe that if you are between 17 and 40 years old, there are jobs available for those who are motivated to find them. As others have said, if you have a health problem (disability), the doors are a bit more difficult to open. Depending on your skills and qualifications, there are many jobs.

From ages 16 to 45, it was never difficult for me to find a suitable job, often with a view to advancement.

But once you turn 45, your prospects diminish. I have watched over 49 years in the workforce how times have changed. When I started young, all workers were older workers, although slow to change, they rewarded loyalty and initiative. Over time, this was uneven and now most managers appear to be between 21 and 40 years old, many without life skills. They adapt quickly to market changes but have no skills with people. You only promote the young and you rarely want to hear the opinions of older workers.

When it comes to workplace problems, it's almost like witchcraft. they are afraid to act. Set up HR departments and keep shuffling the cards. Racism exists everywhere, not just Europeans, and it is often hidden under the rug.

If you ever have a problem, document it. Never let it slide. They just snowball

The result I see is that they constantly reinvent the wheel and wonder why productivity is lost. They don't want to learn from older workers. Tried and true will always be a good starting point.

The short answer is if you meet the Youth criteria. Yes. Work is relatively easy to find.

Over 45 You will find it more difficult regardless of your skills or qualifications

"Good luck"

There are several ways to apply for a job in New Zealand. If you know exactly which company you want to work for, go directly to their website, where vacancies will sometimes be displayed.

… But also approach employers face-to-face

Only a fraction of the jobs done in New Zealand are advertised online. Approaching an employer and simply asking for a job is very helpful in New Zealand.

Once you've found a place you like and want to find a job, print out some CVs and take a walk around town / town / city. Go into offices, hostels, shops, cafes, etc., ask for the manager and ask if there are

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There are several ways to apply for a job in New Zealand. If you know exactly which company you want to work for, go directly to their website, where vacancies will sometimes be displayed.

… But also approach employers face-to-face

Only a fraction of the jobs done in New Zealand are advertised online. Approaching an employer and simply asking for a job is very helpful in New Zealand.

Once you've found a place you like and want to find a job, print out some CVs and take a walk around town / town / city. Go into offices, hostels, shops, cafes, etc., ask for the manager, and ask if there are any job openings available. Demonstrating that you are proactive and confident are highly sought after by employers.

Browse newspapers, newsletters and job boards

Newspapers and Newsletters

Your first experience of living like a local is probably reading a local newspaper or newsletter (a magazine with short news and classified advertising) and looking at job openings. They can usually be found at convenience stores and bottle stores. Find out when the newspaper or newsletter is published so you can be one of the first to pick it up and apply for the jobs inside.

Notice boards

Yes, they still use bulletin boards in New Zealand! These are found in local supermarkets and convenience stores. They often have bulletin boards full of job announcements, space to rent, and items to sell near the supermarket entrance. Something similar can be found in many backpacker hostels. Ask the receptionist if she has a job notice board.

Join a job recruitment agency

This option is by no means something you should solely rely on, but it certainly is a useful tool in your job search kit!

The idea of ​​a recruitment agency is to be matched for an interview with potential employers. Signing up with a job recruitment agency is usually free, so you have nothing to lose. Plus, they have access to jobs that aren't advertised anywhere else.

Be persistent! You may not get a job on the first try, but there may be something waiting around the corner just for you. This is by far the most effective method of finding work in New Zealand.

Visit my blog to read more about interview tips and how to write an awesome resume.

Space

Most jobs are advertised on Trademe jobs or with Seek Jobs. Make sure your CV and cover letter are free of spelling or grammatical errors, especially if English is your second language.

Try for big cities, Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch ... employers in these places are more used to foreign employees and people of different ethnicities / languages ​​(as a woman in trades I have found them more open to me too! !)

If it is English as a second language… Work on your English !! And when you immerse yourself here with English-speaking friends, roommates, etc.

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Most jobs are advertised on Trademe jobs or with Seek Jobs. Make sure your CV and cover letter are free of spelling or grammatical errors, especially if English is your second language.

Try for big cities, Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch ... employers in these places are more used to foreign employees and people of different ethnicities / languages ​​(as a woman in trades I have found them more open to me too! !)

If it is English as a second language… Work on your English !! And when you are here, immerse yourself with English-speaking friends, roommates, etc.

Attitude and enthusiasm cross all ethnic and language barriers! Be brave and have fun communicating!

Do not give up! New Zealand employers may be weak to answer you. Don't take it personally and don't be afraid to call them and politely ask if they have made up their minds!

Employment in smaller cities is mostly about who you know, ask your friends / family to promote you!

Good luck! Stay positive :)

Unfortunately, there are no easy ways to get a job in New Zealand. I cannot speak for Australia.

Finding a job in New Zealand requires that you have the necessary skills, qualification and experience. You must select your job type and apply for each position. If you are called for an interview, you must show up and win that position. These are common sense approaches.

If there was an easy way, then everyone would want to get into New Zealand.

Depending on where you are and what your specialty is, you need to check all the websites and apply. Once you hear from an interested party op

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Unfortunately, there are no easy ways to get a job in New Zealand. I cannot speak for Australia.

Finding a job in New Zealand requires that you have the necessary skills, qualification and experience. You must select your job type and apply for each position. If you are called for an interview, you must show up and win that position. These are common sense approaches.

If there was an easy way, then everyone would want to get into New Zealand.

Depending on where you are and what your specialty is, you need to check all the websites and apply. Once you hear from an interested party or person, make a move to follow up.

The Immigration Department will tell you whether or not you will be allowed in.

New Zealand is a great place to work, but you must have skills, qualifications, and experience to get here. There is no demand for unskilled labor. To get started, you will first need to support yourself. For starters, it could be between NZ $ 2500-3000 / month. This means that you need to find a job within that range. If you are in Auckland, make sure it is not less than 3000pm.

Good luck.

Not at the moment due to covid. Otherwise, we lack milkers, orchard pickers, nurses, doctors, caretakers, and teachers, among others. There are specific fees and rules that cannot be accumulated and wait for entry. Also learn to speak and understand English well. I work in a restaurant and we are very short staffed. Many of my colleagues are foreigners and I do not understand what they say. Too bad the poor residents with hearing problems, dementia and serious health problems are left baffled by the lack of communication.

For people with the right skills, it is definitely easy. There is a severe skills shortage in some areas and this is recognized by the government and companies and foreign workers are actively encouraged to come to New Zealand for these roles.

I personally work in IT and have employed some people from abroad in this way.

IT is the most well-known area with a skills shortage, but it is important to note that not everything is IT. The biggest shortage is related to software development, but not all software languages ​​are created equal.

I'm not very familiar with other shortage areas, but I think someone will have a high level

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For people with the right skills, it is definitely easy. There is a severe skills shortage in some areas and this is recognized by the government and companies and foreign workers are actively encouraged to come to New Zealand for these roles.

I personally work in IT and have employed some people from abroad in this way.

IT is the most well-known area with a skills shortage, but it is important to note that not everything is IT. The biggest shortage is related to software development, but not all software languages ​​are created equal.

I'm not very familiar with other areas of shortage, but I think someone with high-level skills or experience in any area has a good chance.

Finding a job is never easy ... until you have it. NZ is all about relationships, so build on the people you meet. I think it was Malcolm Gladwell who pointed out that the people in your immediate network know the same thing as you. You need to talk to people in your range of contact to expand your circle of reference. Another interesting thing in New Zealand is that employers tend not to be creative when it comes to cross-skills. They want people who have done what they need before, so when applying or interviewing, that will be part of their sales duties. Good luck.

If it's about getting a job in New Zealand, then

There are two ways:
1) Either you settle there and as a citizen / visitor (extended visa approval) and look for local jobs like bank etc.

2) Join companies that trade around the world (international) so you can get posted there. But this option is just a test and probability method, it practically does not make any sense.
So for me the first option should be the correct one.

There is nothing easy, but tried?

The only proven method is to be consistent, persistent, and never give up.

That's the thing about a job: it's not guaranteed, it's not easy, it's not safe.

Nothing in life really is, unless you're willing to take matters into your own hands and give yourself a better chance. However, even that is not guaranteed either.

If there is a job you want, you should look for it. If you don't have the skills, you need to acquire the skills.

If you are looking for work in New Zealand, it is more or less the same process as applying for work anywhere, but you should be aware that many jobs will require you to be a permanent resident, a New Zealand citizen, or have a work visa.

To work here, you need to check if you qualify. There is a test to take on the immigration website. The more points you earn, the better your chances of being able to work here. The link will take you to the New Zealand Immigration Service website.

New Zealand Visas | New Zealand immigration

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