Can it absorb ink from an ink cartridge?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Harriet Hudson



Can it absorb ink from an ink cartridge?

Thanks for the A2A.

Most ink cartridges are designed to have an inlet opening at the top where an ink bottle is filled through an inkjet needle.

Using a refill clip (provided by a refill kit), there is also a rubber outlet at the bottom of the cartridge where a suction syringe is used to balance internal and external air pressure by sucking up excess ink.

Therefore, if you want to absorb ink from an ink cartridge, you will need a refill kit that usually contains suction syringes.

To suck up ink, this is what you can do with a general refill kit (see the manual for

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Thanks for the A2A.

Most ink cartridges are designed to have an inlet opening at the top where an ink bottle is filled through an inkjet needle.

Using a refill clip (provided by a refill kit), there is also a rubber outlet at the bottom of the cartridge where a suction syringe is used to balance internal and external air pressure by sucking up excess ink.

Therefore, if you want to absorb ink from an ink cartridge, you will need a refill kit that usually contains suction syringes.

To suck up ink, here is what you can do with a general refill kit (check your refill kit manual for proper use):

  1. Insert the mouthpiece portion of the cartridge into the refill clip. Push the top of the cartridge until it clicks into place.
  2. Plug the suction syringe into the rubber hole at the bottom of the refill clip. Slowly suck up the ink. 0.5 ml is the acceptable amount to balance external and internal air pressures, as well as to remove excess ink.
  3. Remove the syringe.
  4. Remove the refill clip. Clean the nozzle by wiping with a soft cloth.
  5. Install the cartridge in the printer and start the cleaning cycle to further clean the nozzle.

We hope this helps.

I don't think you can HP cartridges, others can. I think the nozzle holes on the HP cartridges are too small to allow ink to come out. It must be expelled by the printing process. Others would have to put a very absorbent material in contact with the "pad" that contains the ink. Placing any cartridge in a centrifuge could eject the ink. I have not tried it.

Why is ink cartridge refilling not good for printers?

Many reasons:

Print heads are very complex and delicate pieces of high-tech engineering. It's just amazing that they even work in the first place! Because if it comes down to this simple factor, they have to be treated very kindly to keep them going.

Let's look at some of the things that make the print head happy and unhappy (good things and bad things). I'll limit this discussion to the world's largest inkjet printer manufacturer… EPSON.

Believe it or not (but believe it), NOT all ink is the same! Even from Epson! ... There is

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Why is ink cartridge refilling not good for printers?

Many reasons:

Print heads are very complex and delicate pieces of high-tech engineering. It's just amazing that they even work in the first place! Because if it comes down to this simple factor, they have to be treated very kindly to keep them going.

Let's look at some of the things that make the print head happy and unhappy (good things and bad things). I'll limit this discussion to the world's largest inkjet printer manufacturer… EPSON.

Believe it or not (but believe it), NOT all ink is the same! Even from Epson! ... There are several different “ink sets” that are made for different models of your printers.

What makes inks different? Various factors…

1. What are they made of.

2. What is the pH of the ink?

3. What is the viscosity of the ink?

4. Can the ink withstand high temperatures?

5. Can ink dissipate heat without changing its viscosity?

6. What effect does humidity have on the ink setting in the head?

I bet you never thought about all those factors that had any effect on the print head. In fact, each of those factors is factored into the printhead engineering design process. In other words ... the print head is designed for special tolerances designed around the ink to be used!

Let's see how those 6 things come into play with a printhead.

# 1… There are several different formulas for ink. For example, are they alcohol-based, or glycerin-based, or whatever various other types of base? A ... Most of the "ink sets" commonly used in home printers are "alcohol and glycol" based inks. Then there are others that use a "glycerin and alcohol" base. To this base dyes are added, both natural and organic or artificial. B ... The other type of common use is "pigmented dyes", usually based on glycerin and then pigments are added (actually very finely ground organic pigments, the same ones used in artists' oil paintings) to create the different colors. These two basic types make up the majority of inks. Each type is extremely different from each other, AND they will NEVER, NEVER, NEVER interbreed ...

# 2… Acidic, Neutral or Base? Each of the formulas mentioned in n. 1 above has an inherent pH. Why does this matter to a printhead? The internals and materials used to make the microscopic nozzles can only tolerate what they are designed for. The manufacturer makes sure that when they design and engineer the print head, it manages the pH of the ink set for which it is designed. Well ... .. Change the pH, even a very small amount, and the inks themselves will start to corrode the inner workings of the printhead ... VERY BAD Things will happen to the printhead.

# 3… How thick or thin is the ink, and are all the colors in the set the same thickness? "Pigmented dyes" are VERY THICK compared to normal "inks". The viscosity of the ink is affected by temperature. Think hot and cold syrup…. Also, the actual size of the nozzle and the ports for feeding the nozzles are very different in physical size. A thick ink cannot be forced very well through nozzles that are too small ... Clogged nozzles will occur. And Death to the printer head, all the time. This happens very often when trying to run dye-sublimation inks (which are a set of thick inks), through a printer designed for normal inks.

# 4… If the print head uses Piazo Electric principles, it should. I am not going to delve too deeply into this, as the “Magic” of the Piazo head is very complex and does not matter too much, except that the Ink heated in the process has to remain liquid, not solidify, to work. If not, then it is simple, Head is Dead….

# 5 ... This is kind of like # 4, except that if the ink does not transfer the heat generated by the Piazo process, the printhead overheats, drying the ink in some of the nozzles, and can actually cause a " Head Meltdown "internally. Final result ... Head is Dead again.

# 6… What effect does humidity have? If it's not actually printing, the head is fixed and loaded, ready to go… If you live in a dry part of the country, the ink can and will dry out at the print nozzles…. Whoops, that's not good. The ink must also be formulated to handle this. Printers often have "capping stations" that attempt to seal the printhead from exposure and generally work well with inks formulated for printers' mechanical systems, but there is no guarantee for other less tolerant formulations. Dried ink in the nozzles may, or may not, ever be able to be cleaned, no matter how many head cleaning cycles you run ... The head may be dead ...

So ... You have a very expensive printer that uses some of the latest technology. You want to save a few dollars by buying second-hand or third-party ink sets, or even refilling your own "refillable" cartridges. Everybody hates the price of the OEM inks sold (me too!). BUT ... how do you know that the inks you bought from someone meet all of those technical specifications and won't ruin your particular printer model? Some aftermarket inks will work just fine…. And some… “Head is Dead” in no time. And here I basically explained why, some will turn off their printer ... some may take longer (# 2) and seem to work fine for a while.

ALSO: Some aftermarket cartridges (e-bay, Amazon, etc.) are NOT designed to meet OEM specifications and will actually starve a printhead by not delivering enough ink fast for head demands. Starving the printhead is bad (see # 5).

And finally: the actual color of the ink is probably different from the original. You make an impression and the colors are different from what you see on the screen. Make adjustments and reprint, repeat, and print again ... that's not saving money, your time, or your frustration. But don't blame the printer if you use someone else's ink set. ALSO: The warranty is voided if the print head is damaged by the use of third party inks.

Personal Disclaimer: I do not work for any manufacturer, I am self employed. My two main printers are 42 ″ Epson 9900 and P8000. Ink carts cost over $ 240.00 each, and there are 11 of them, add that up, but the printhead costs over $ 2000.00 to replace.

Also in the early 90's, I saved maybe $ 20 when refilling cartridges. I bought my printer the moment the price dropped a few dollars below $ 1,000. It took a couple of months, but the third party ink slowly killed the printer. It became totally unusable.

On a specific printer forum, there were the usual complaints about the cost of ink, with people wondering why a third party didn't make the ink comparable to Epson but for pennies on the dollar. Interestingly, a third-party ink distributor replied. He said it could achieve ink as archival and accurate as Epson. However, I would have to put a price on it

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Also in the early 90's, I saved maybe $ 20 when refilling cartridges. I bought my printer the moment the price dropped a few dollars below $ 1,000. It took a couple of months, but the third party ink slowly killed the printer. It became totally unusable.

On a specific printer forum, there were the usual complaints about the cost of ink, with people wondering why a third party didn't make the ink comparable to Epson but for pennies on the dollar. Interestingly, a third-party ink distributor replied. He said it could achieve ink as archival and accurate as Epson. However, you would have to price it several times higher than Epson's. They produce it in large enough quantities to take advantage of wholesale prices and price the product as low as possible. No one can compete with them.

On the other hand, you know what you are buying. A color testing lab performs accelerated fading tests on all dyes, pigments, etc. of the industry and can accurately estimate the time until the color begins to fade. This is essential for print collectors, museum curators, and art dealers. No such data exists for third party inks. Printer manufacturers supply high-precision drivers for their own papers, and third-party paper suppliers also supply them based on the absolutely accurate colors of proprietary ink cartridges. This is impossible for unknown inks.

So if you don't mind your work, by all means refill your cartridges. Or buy a laser printer instead. Very inexpensive to operate, it uses plain copy paper and produces really horrible results.

Replace the ink chip

1. Purchase an ink refill kit and smart chip that are compatible with the cartridges used in your printer. You can usually find kits that include smart chips at office supply stores or online retailers (links in Resources).

2. Turn off the printer and remove the cartridges according to the instructions in the user guide or the labels on the inside of the maintenance door cover.

3. Refill the cartridge according to the instructions on the ink refill kit.

4. Orient the cartridge so that you can access the smart chip at the bottom. Use tweezers or a knife to carefully pry the smart chip

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Replace the ink chip

1. Purchase an ink refill kit and smart chip that are compatible with the cartridges used in your printer. You can usually find kits that include smart chips at office supply stores or online retailers (links in Resources).

2. Turn off the printer and remove the cartridges according to the instructions in the user guide or the labels on the inside of the maintenance door cover.

3. Refill the cartridge according to the instructions on the ink refill kit.

4. Orient the cartridge so that you can access the smart chip at the bottom. Use tweezers or a knife to carefully pry the smart chip until it comes loose from the plastic tabs that hold it in place. Alternatively, use the tweezers to pry the chip out from under the tabs if you have an access opening that allows you to slide it out of the case. Remove the old smart chip and set it aside.

5. Insert the new chip into the slot or under the tabs on the bottom of the cartridge. Push the chip down onto the tabs carefully or slide it into the slot until secure.

6. Reinsert the ink cartridge into the printer cartridge carriage. Turn on the printer and use it as you normally would.

I think the only way to prevent it from drying out is by using it frequently. In that sense, they look a lot like regular inkjet printers. Ink tanks may be a bit less expensive than ink cartridge printers, but I'll be picking up a laser printer any day. I have never had "bad" toner on me.

Aside from high-end art printers and photo printing, I don't see why inkjet printers are already in use. Producing the ink is a great source of income for businesses, but laser printing is cheaper in the long run for consumers. (I guess that's the real answer. Most people don't think more than 2

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I think the only way to prevent it from drying out is by using it frequently. In that sense, they look a lot like regular inkjet printers. Ink tanks may be a bit less expensive than ink cartridge printers, but I'll be picking up a laser printer any day. I have never had "bad" toner on me.

Aside from high-end art printers and photo printing, I don't see why inkjet printers are already in use. Producing the ink is a great source of income for businesses, but laser printing is cheaper in the long run for consumers. (I guess that's the real answer. Most people don't think for more than two weeks).

The worst thing for a printer head is running out of ink. In most cases, it will kill the print head, causing it to overheat on the delicate jets of ink. Out of ink = Print head death….

So printer manufacturers make sure that you cannot run the print head dry ... If your ink cartridge says it has 25ml of ink, it most likely has more than 30ml in the cartridge. You can use all 25ml of the promised ink ... but there's that extra cushion left in the carriage, just so it doesn't kill your printhead by letting it dry. The printer monitors how much you actually used, and

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The worst thing for a printer head is running out of ink. In most cases, it will kill the print head, causing it to overheat on the delicate jets of ink. Out of ink = Print head death….

So printer manufacturers make sure that you cannot run the print head dry ... If your ink cartridge says it has 25ml of ink, it most likely has more than 30ml in the cartridge. You can use all 25ml of the promised ink ... but there's that extra cushion left in the carriage, just so it doesn't kill your printhead by letting it dry. The printer monitors the amount you actually used and gives you a "low ink" warning, based on the amount that passed through the print head, not the amount left in the carriage.

Well ... Maybe ... On older laser printers (the Minolta 2300DL), you can reset the "percentage of use" indicator when refilling a toner cartridge. In many later systems (the Dell 1350cnw), the cars had a chip that had a "burned out" part when a certain percentage was depleted. Refill kits for these types of printers include replacement chips along with the toner to solve this problem.

So, look on eBay for replacement chips along with the refill kit for your unit.

// DISCLAIMER: I own the two laser printers mentioned above.

To refill 652 ink cartridges, follow the steps below

1. Remove the cartridges from the printer.

2. If sealed, tear off the top seal to display the ink supply.

3. There are three holes for tri-color cartridges and one for black.

4. For tri-color cartridges, take a needle and gently insert it into the holes, it will identify the colors of the inks.

5. Remove old ink from cartridges with primer tools.

6. Put 6 to 8 ml of ink into the syringe and push it into the respective ink holes that you have identified.

7. Do this for all colors and black cartridge.

8. Use prime t

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To refill 652 ink cartridges, follow the steps below

1. Remove the cartridges from the printer.

2. If sealed, tear off the top seal to display the ink supply.

3. There are three holes for tri-color cartridges and one for black.

4. For tri-color cartridges, take a needle and gently insert it into the holes, it will identify the colors of the inks.

5. Remove old ink from cartridges with primer tools.

6. Put 6 to 8 ml of ink into the syringe and push it into the respective ink holes that you have identified.

7. Do this for all colors and black cartridge.

8. Use the priming tool to prime the cartridges.

9. Gently rub the cartridges on the smooth paper, you will get crisp nozzle lines.

10. Install the cartridges in the printer.

Yes, there are still printers that use HP 564 ink. The following printers are not a very complete list:

I found this in a similar question, answered by Rikke Dam:

What printers use a 564 ink cartridge?

Additionally, some of the HP Envy series All-in-One printers also use 564 ink.

Definitely one that doesn't use cartridges. I use an Epson eco tank printer, which is extremely cheap with ink (at least for my use and budget). Other manufacturers have the same concept but different names.

Yes, you will need to buy one of those CISS systems, they are available on most inkjet printers, however some printers are more suitable for CISS installation and some are not.

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