Can I remove my money plant from the potting soil and grow it with just water? The peat it was in has a whitish growth and I'm afraid my plant will die if I leave it.

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Colt Fisher



Can I remove my money plant from the potting soil and grow it with just water? The peat it was in has a whitish growth and I'm afraid my plant will die if I leave it.

No, your plant needs soil, preferably a good potting mix that is changed every year.

So yes, it will die if you don't change the soil, but it will still die if you don't give it soil and put it in water.

Plant roots need air and nutrients from the soil, as well as water. For most plants, the water still around the roots kills them.

I suggest you learn how to grow plants, what plants need, and how to change soil and replant your plant from YouTube videos.

The basis of all prosperity is growing plants, check out urban gardening and community gardens as well. There are probably people near you who can

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No, your plant needs soil, preferably a good potting mix that is changed every year.

So yes, it will die if you don't change the soil, but it will still die if you don't give it soil and put it in water.

Plant roots need air and nutrients from the soil, as well as water. For most plants, the water still around the roots kills them.

I suggest you learn how to grow plants, what plants need, and how to change soil and replant your plant from YouTube videos.

The basis of all prosperity is growing plants, check out urban gardening and community gardens as well. There are likely people near you who can help you with your money tree and much more.

Generally not! Except for aquatic plants and native swamp plants, plant roots require both air and water. I suggest that you gently remove the peat, saving as many healthy roots as possible, and transplant the plant into a good quality potting mix.
For most houseplants, pure peat is not a satisfactory growing medium.
It is also possible that the white material is accumulated hard water or fertilizer salts. Transplanting into a quality potting mix is ​​also the answer to built-up salts.

Good luck!

Your question reflects a common misconception of many people, which I hope I can help you understand better. The plant itself consists of leaves, stems, and roots. Therefore, the roots are as much a part of the plant as the leaves and stems. Furthermore, we now understand that the soil is also an integral part of the plant. So when you water "just the ground", you are watering the "plant itself". It would be impossible to water the soil without watering the plant. Perhaps you can see, then, that your question as it is actually does not make any sense.

Yet it occurs to me that maybe you

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Your question reflects a common misconception of many people, which I hope I can help you understand better. The plant itself consists of leaves, stems, and roots. Therefore, the roots are as much a part of the plant as the leaves and stems. Furthermore, we now understand that the soil is also an integral part of the plant. So when you water "just the ground", you are watering the "plant itself". It would be impossible to water the soil without watering the plant. Perhaps you can see, then, that your question as it is actually does not make any sense.

However, it seems to me that you may be trying to figure out if there is any difference between watering the plants (and we are talking about outdoor plants here rather than indoor potted plants) with a hose pointing to the ground or letting the water fall on them from above, either from rain or from a hose, etc.

The water must reach the soil, saturate it and be absorbed by the roots so that it can then move through the rest of the plant. When the water falls on the leaves first, it can remove dirt, allowing the leaves to work more effectively. Furthermore, the actual humidity in the leaves positively affects some metabolic activities associated with the transfer of gases between the leaves and the air. However, the main function of water is to be absorbed by the roots and then transported throughout the plant, and the plant does not care if the water comes from the air above or just appears in the soil around it.

On a final note, it might be helpful to understand the reality of plants to think of them as creatures with their heads on the ground and their sexual parts waving in the air. I read this somewhere, although I don't know who said it first, but it really tells you a lot about how plants work.

Edit: I ran over the information later, that observation was made by Charles Darwin.

You didn't mention if you're asking for potted houseplants or outdoor garden plants, but the movement of water through the soil is similar in both. If the plants dry out too quickly, either the soil doesn't get enough water to fully moisten in the first place, or it's on the "thick" side and the water doesn't stick for long. I will try to talk about potted plants specifically.

When you water a potted plant, you need to pour in enough water to get good runoff from the drainage holes, telling you that all the soil, and all the roots in it, have been completely moistened.

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You didn't mention if you're asking for potted houseplants or outdoor garden plants, but the movement of water through the soil is similar in both. If the plants dry out too quickly, either the soil doesn't get enough water to fully moisten in the first place, or it's on the "thick" side and the water doesn't stick for long. I will try to talk about potted plants specifically.

When watering a potted plant, you need to pour in enough water to get good runoff from the drainage holes, telling you that all the soil, and all the roots in it, have been completely moistened. If the soil seemed very dry, you should let the pot sit in the drainage water for a while, maybe half an hour at least, to soak up whatever it might hold. *

  • * On a side note, you will often read how tremendously important, absolutely imperative, that you empty the drain pan after watering a plant; if you let the plant sit in the water, it will die. Well, I'll say it here, "it's not necessarily so." It is not necessary to drain the water from the drain pan; You don't have to take your plants to the sink and let them drain completely after you water them. The fact that the plants remain in the water for a couple of days will not kill them; what kills them is the soil that remains too wet all the time. This is why you should always test the soil moisture before watering, to make sure the soil is sufficiently aerated before adding more water. Marlie Graves' answer to How Often Should I Water My Indoor Plants?

The other point is the texture of the soil, whether it is coarse or fine. Soil, outdoors or potting mix, is made of particles and spaces. Where there are large particles, there are also large spaces between them, which allow the water to flow quickly; where the particles are small, they compact: water has a hard time passing through, and when it does, it stays there for a long time. So if the plants seem to dry out very quickly, the potting mix probably has a large percentage of sand or other large particulate material.

If you want to increase the water holding capacity of the soil, the best thing you can do is probably add a few smaller particles, usually in the form of compost (some people recommend sterilizing it for use in containers) or already mixed potting soil. . However, keep in mind that increasing the water holding capacity also increases the likelihood of root rot; it may be better to just decide to water more often.

Another condition that will cause plants to dry out very quickly is that the roots are overgrown, sometimes called "root-bound," so that there is not enough space in the pot for the water to stay long enough to be absorbed. by the roots.

In that case, what should be done is to place the plant in the pot or prune the root. In the first case, remove the plant from its pot, get new soil and a pot 1 or 2 sizes larger (the pots are 3 ″, 4 ″, 6 ″, 8 ″, 10 ″, 12 ″, 14 ″ , 18 ″, 24 ″.) Detangle the roots as much as possible, cut off some of the large circular roots and place them in the new pot. To prune the roots, remove the plant from its pot and cut a slice from the bottom of the root mass, and 3 or 4 slices from the sides, place back in the original pot with some fresh soil.

One last condition that comes to mind is too much light. It's not really 'too much' if the plant looks healthy, but you can reduce the amount of water used by moving the plant to a location with slightly less light.

There are several factors that can influence how quickly the soil of a potted plant dries: plant species, amount of light, soil composition, pot size, size of the root mass within the pot, amount of water used.

Some species of plants simply use more water than others.

More light will evaporate water faster than less light. Also, plants that grow with more light will metabolize faster than those with less light, so they will use water faster.

Dense and heavy soil holds water longer than loose sandy soil.

A larger mass of soil (a larger pot), due to the physics of evaporation, will remain

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There are several factors that can influence how quickly the soil of a potted plant dries: plant species, amount of light, soil composition, pot size, size of the root mass within the pot, amount of water used.

Some species of plants simply use more water than others.

More light will evaporate water faster than less light. Also, plants that grow with more light will metabolize faster than those with less light, so they will use water faster.

Dense and heavy soil holds water longer than loose sandy soil.

A larger mass of soil (a larger pot), due to the physics of evaporation, will remain wet longer than a smaller mass of soil.

The roots absorb moisture, so a plant with many roots will absorb more moisture than a plant with few roots.

When you pour only a small amount of water, that water disappears quickly; When a lot of water is poured so that it comes out abundantly through the drainage holes, the soil is completely soaked, so it takes longer for the water to disappear.

So there is probably a combination of factors that make the large plant stay wet longer than the small one.

But I would like to address something you said, "The soil in my large plant is always wet ...". While there are some plants that should not be allowed to dry out (ferns, for example), the general rule of thumb for houseplants is that the soil should be dry, or almost dry, before watering again. Soil that stays wet all the time is a disaster for plants because the roots will rot.

You should always test the soil moisture before watering, and if the soil is still wet, do not water again until the target moisture level for that plant species is reached. Also, be sure to check the soil moisture all the way to the bottom of the pot, not just on the surface or a couple of inches higher. Plants often remain wet at the bottom, even though the top is dry; then the roots, which are at the bottom, can rot, the plant dies and the owner is puzzled, because he thought he was watering when the soil was dry.

If the soil remains wet or damp for more than 3 weeks, there is an issue that needs to be addressed.

First, make sure the plant is not sitting in the water if it is in a waterproof container. Pour or suck up (with a turkey syringe) the extra water. You may be able to remove the plant from the pot and wrap the soil / roots in newspaper for a day to absorb additional moisture. Second, move the plant to a place with more light, closer to a window or under a light bulb, or use a brighter light bulb. Third, install a small fan to blow over the plant and help the air evaporate the water.

If the plant has been sitting in moist soil for more than a month or two, it is very likely that many of the roots are already rotten; Often times, you don't see a sign on the leaves that the roots are rotting until the entire plant appears to almost drop dead. As the roots rot, the plant can absorb less and less water, which could be another reason why the soil is not drying out.

The good news is that many houseplants are very hardy, and if you can bring the soil back to a good moisture level - in other words, letting it almost dry out between water additions - the plant will start to take new roots and old. the dead will actually increase the fertility of the soil.

As an extreme measure you can transplant the plant. You should try other things first, because transplanting a stressed plant can easily destroy the few healthy roots that remain. Cut off all mushy, mushy, mushy, or brown roots. If transplanting, be sure to use a light, well-draining potting soil (cactus and perlite mix, 2: 1, is good) and use a pot that is no more than an inch larger than the clean root mass.

Here are some tips on how to care for a money plant to make it grow faster.

When to plant

You can start planting your money plant any time of the year at any time.

Where to plant

The money plant can grow in both direct and indirect sunlight. However, too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to turn yellow and even burn them.

I have placed my money plant on a shady terrace where it receives only indirect sunlight and is growing very well, spreading across the roof with 8 to 10 branches, all about 5 meters long.

Propagation of the money plant

The money plant is very easy to propagate. The plant is propagated from stem cutti

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Here are some tips on how to care for a money plant to make it grow faster.

When to plant

You can start planting your money plant any time of the year at any time.

Where to plant

The money plant can grow in both direct and indirect sunlight. However, too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to turn yellow and even burn them.

I have placed my money plant on a shady terrace where it receives only indirect sunlight and is growing very well, spreading across the roof with 8 to 10 branches, all about 5 meters long.

Propagation of the money plant

The money plant is very easy to propagate. The plant is propagated from stem cuttings. It can be grown both on land and in water.

Money plant growing in water

  1. The important step on how to start a money plant from cuttings is to select a healthy branch, about 30 cm.
  2. Cut the branch at a 45-degree angle above a node, which is where the leaves emerge. The branch must have a minimum of 2-3 nodes.
  3. Place the cutting in a container such as a glass or plastic bottle, a glass of water, old electric bulbs, a pitcher full of clean water.
  4. Keep at least one node below the water level.
  5. Place the container close to sunlight. You can hang the bottle so that the branches fall.
  6. New roots will grow into the nodes in a few weeks.
  7. Keep changing the water when it becomes cloudy, it may be once a week.
  8. Add water frequently to maintain level.
  9. No fertilizer is needed, but you can add a nitrate-based fertilizer to the water for faster growth. I, however, do not add any fertilizer.

Money plants don't need much care if you don't go overboard with sunlight, water, and fertilizers. It is difficult to kill, which is why it is known as devil's creeper or ivy.

The money plant (scientific or botanical name: Epipremnum aureum) is a popular houseplant that is grown indoors primarily in water. Having a money plant at home is believed to bring good luck, happiness, wealth, and prosperity. The money plant is also known by many other names such as golden pothos, silver vine, devil's vine, devil's ivy, Solomon Islands ivy, hunter's robe, ivy hoop, taro vine, etc.

There is a belief that having a money plant in the house to attract the energy of wealth and prosperity, according to Vastu and Feng Sui.

When you water plants, here we are talking about potted plants, I hope that is what you are asking, the goal is to supply water to the roots, which absorb water from the soil for the rest of the plant. The soil must have a lot of water so that the roots can absorb all the needs of the plant. The leaves do not absorb water.

Many people, having heard that overwatering is the number one killer of potted plants, try to water "sparingly," either by pouring small sips into the soil or using a spray bottle. Unfortunately, your plants will probably die just as quickly from this t

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When you water plants, here we are talking about potted plants, I hope that is what you are asking, the goal is to supply water to the roots, which absorb water from the soil for the rest of the plant. The soil must have a lot of water so that the roots can absorb all the needs of the plant. The leaves do not absorb water.

Many people, having heard that overwatering is the number one killer of potted plants, try to water "sparingly," either by pouring small sips into the soil or using a spray bottle. Unfortunately, your plants will likely die just as quickly from this treatment as they will from excess water, maybe even faster.

"Overwatering" does not mean pouring in too much water, it means keeping the soil too wet for too long. Another way of saying this is not to let the soil dry out enough between waterings.

When watering a potted plant, you should pour in plenty of water, enough to produce good runoff from the drainage holes. With the plant placed in some kind of drainage saucer to catch runoff, there should be enough water to cover at least the drainage holes (or about 1/2 ″, if the drainage holes are at the bottom). to pour this water; Contrary to what you hear so often, plants won't die from sitting in a little water for a few days. (What kills them is sitting in the water for weeks, without the soil ever having a chance to dry out.)

Then don't water again until the roots have absorbed most of the water; sometimes we say don't water again until the soil is slightly damp or almost dry. What happens is that water has been absorbed and air has entered the ground. The roots must have air as well as water.

The secret (one of them, anyway) to maintaining indoor plants is to test the soil's moisture before watering, and only water when the soil has used most of the moisture, all the way to the bottom of the pot. There are several ways to test for humidity - more information here -

Garden soils are often full of all kinds of fungal and bacterial organisms and, most likely, some insect eggs or larvae, any of which could pose a problem for houseplants in general.

Seeds and seedlings are extremely vulnerable to certain bacterial and fungal rots, which can end up with an entire tray of new seedlings. Older, well-established plants generally don't care about these diseases, but cuttings and seedlings are another story. By the way, there is a product, NOT WET, that can be used in water to water the seedlings, which can prevent some of the most serious rot diseases.

Any antif

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Garden soils are often full of all kinds of fungal and bacterial organisms and, most likely, some insect eggs or larvae, any of which could pose a problem for houseplants in general.

Seeds and seedlings are extremely vulnerable to certain bacterial and fungal rots, which can end up with an entire tray of new seedlings. Older, well-established plants generally don't care about these diseases, but cuttings and seedlings are another story. By the way, there is a product, NOT WET, that can be used in water to water the seedlings, which can prevent some of the most serious rot diseases.

Any antifungal would probably help some, but DAMP is NOT specifically for this type of problem. I am sure there are similar products, but this is the only one that I know personally.

However, if your garden soil is the only soil you have access to for now, you can avoid most disease / insect problems by sterilizing it.

This is most often accomplished by baking the earth in the oven. Spread it in thin layers on a baking sheet to do just that. Unfortunately, it can be quite smelly, so if there are other family members, they may object.

If the garden soil is too heavy or rough, you can rinse it off with a little sand and sift it to get a finer consistency that will suit the seedlings much better. If you happen to not have soil seives on hand, then a kitchen sieve or window screen may do the trick.

It takes a bit of effort, but it is certainly doable. You can save time and labor by purchasing a commercially prepared seed starter.

Potting medium, or indoor plant soil, is very different from outdoor soil. It is a different kind of ecology and a different set of physics. The biggest problem with potting soil is that it compacts (tightens) slowly over months and years, closing off the spaces that need to be filled with water and air. Even with the correct amounts of fertilizer, compacted soil will slowly strangle the plant.

That is why the plants need to be transplanted every year or two. They can be put back in the same pot if you don't want them to grow any more. Contrary to what some people think, both

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Potting medium, or indoor plant soil, is very different from outdoor soil. It is a different kind of ecology and a different set of physics. The biggest problem with potting soil is that it compacts (tightens) slowly over months and years, closing off the spaces that need to be filled with water and air. Even with the correct amounts of fertilizer, compacted soil will slowly strangle the plant.

That is why the plants need to be transplanted every year or two. They can be put back in the same pot if you don't want them to grow any more. Contrary to what some people think, as much of the old soil as possible needs to be washed or removed, and maybe 1/4 - 1/3 of the existing roots can be cut off. Fine roots are not damaged by cutting or breaking them.

By the way, the outdoor soil is constantly being replenished by the decomposition of plant matter (fallen leaves, broken stems, cut pieces, etc.) and animal life (insects, fungi, bacteria, etc.)

NO NO NO, don't do it, I repeat, never ever buy a packet of coco peat. At first, the media will look very attractive as it feels soft and the perfect material when first hydrated, but then after a week or two, you will have to face the music. Coconut peat is almost impossible to rehydrate if it dries out. It will practically behave like Styrofoam if it dries completely. The worst case scenario will be that the coconut peat will breed little white worms in it and kill your plants. So NEVER EVER THINK ABOUT USING COCOPEAT.

Yes, we can grow a small branch of money plant in water. We can use a glass or a wide-mouth glass container or even a bottle. Since the water will lack soil nutrients, for better growth, the water can be changed after a few days. On hot or summer days, mosquito larvae sometimes develop in containers as well. Therefore, the water must be changed frequently.

The growth of the money plant is restricted. So when it is transferred from the soil to the water, the size of the leaf can decrease. In the ground the plant grows better.

Money plant growing in the ground (pot)

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Yes, we can grow a small branch of money plant in water. We can use a glass or a wide-mouth glass container or even a bottle. Since the water will lack soil nutrients, for better growth, the water can be changed after a few days. On hot or summer days, mosquito larvae sometimes develop in containers as well. Therefore, the water must be changed frequently.

The growth of the money plant is restricted. So when it is transferred from the soil to the water, the size of the leaf can decrease. In the ground the plant grows better.

Money plant growing in the ground (pot)

You can if you want to always water and use additional nutrients. Peat has little to no nutritional value and drains quickly. It's okay to start with seeds, but generally plants need more to thrive.

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