Can I get out of a job interview if I feel the interview is patronizing?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Zak George



Can I get out of a job interview if I feel the interview is patronizing?

Certainly. But don't forget that the interviewer is only part of the company. Would you work for him / her? Could the interviewer just treat everyone that way? (little man with authority complex). Could the interviewer be purposely trying to see how "thick your skin is"? Also, it would be your word against the interviewer's.

Just remember that if you retire, say something rude, etc., you will probably never be eligible for a position with that company. If that's okay, walk away. But I think it would be better to finish. Hey, you can become condescending when you reject their

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Certainly. But don't forget that the interviewer is only part of the company. Would you work for him / her? Could the interviewer just treat everyone that way? (little man with authority complex). Could the interviewer be purposely trying to see how "thick your skin is"? Also, it would be your word against the interviewer's.

Just remember that if you retire, say something rude, etc., you will probably never be eligible for a position with that company. If that's okay, walk away. But I think it would be better to finish. Hey, you could become condescending when you decline his offer!

Yes, technically you could, but would it be the smart thing to do? Maybe not? It depends on what you mean by patronizing in the first place. I would advise staying the duration of the interview and learning more about yourself and the interaction. It will certainly help you feel more comfortable and confident in subsequent interviews.

Leaving an interview is a risky proposition.

You can do it. You will be remembered for it, and probably not in a good way.

Your best bet would be to say quietly and without hostility: “From the way you are speaking to me, I suspect that your work environment will not work for me. Thank you for taking the time to meet me. "Get up. Leave.

He can do whatever he wants; I guess you want to know if you should do it or not.

The worthy thing to do is get through it and move on. Another 10 to 15 minutes will not kill him and he may walk away with his head held high.

It's a small world, and an even smaller industry, so the last thing you need to do is leave behind the reputation of being a "hot head."

You're in an interview and you don't feel like things are going anywhere. Just tell the person how you feel about the interview. Tell him, you think you are wasting your time and his, because of your reason (that's why you asked me the question). I like to be positive and not just sit there and go through the interview for nothing.

Of course. An interview is a two-way street, you may not be right for them, or they may not be right for you. Excuse me politely and leave.

Don't do that, you wanted the job. Not all things go our way. Maturity demands that we follow proper behavior and etiquette

We have an open floor plan. You can see most of the house when you enter. There is an interior wall that separates some, but no interior doors. In the living room, the bottom of the wall was blue, the furniture had blue and peach accents. The curtains were peach colored. The kitchen diner was white, but I did a little design that had a little blue like a chair rail and my floor had a little blue design. Our family room is down a few steps and had a blue valance.

That level of our house had a touch of blue in every room and the lower main wall in one room I think brought it up.

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We have an open floor plan. You can see most of the house when you enter. There is an interior wall that separates some, but no interior doors. In the living room, the bottom of the wall was blue, the furniture had blue and peach accents. The curtains were peach colored. The kitchen diner was white, but I did a little design that had a little blue like a chair rail and my floor had a little blue design. Our family room is down a few steps and had a blue valance.

That level of our house had a touch of blue in every room and the lower main wall in one room I think brought it all together. It wasn't overwhelming or screaming blue. The rest of the house, each room is a different color and none is blue. Most of the people came and said it looked great or brought all the rooms together.

The mother-in-law arrived and it seemed that she was more evaluating than visiting. She commented that our neighborhood is not worthy of her standards (I covered that topic in a previous post). I was obsessed with my four-year-old daughter having a pink room. She didn't think it was right for her to be spoiled for having a princess room. Then she said

"Everything else is blue, I guess if you like everything blue then it would make a nice house."

My husband explained that it was to join the lower level. His response "I would never want that".

After that, I heard it frequently at family gatherings. "I'm sure you want that in blue." or "How are things in the blue house?" and many, many other references to blue in its high tone.

Then my sister-in-law stopped one day. Her husband and mine don't get along because the mother-in-law prospered thanks to triangulation with my husband as the family scapegoat.

The sister-in-law came to the door to pick up something that the mother-in-law left here. I took him to the door and she asked to come in to see the house. I let her in. He looked at me and said: Where is all the blue? I said the wall here, the design in the kitchen, and the valance on the ground floor with a few accents for good measure. She said, "But I keep hearing that everything is blue." I said “That's it. But I wouldn't believe everything the mother-in-law says anyway, but that's my personal choice too. "

Over the years, my husband and I have done it in jest. He painted the exterior blue once, we hoped it would keep the mother-in-law away, of course she didn't come to complain. We got a new sofa and it's solid blue (it was comfortable), we almost covered in blue mulch as a joke, but we couldn't stand it. A fridge we bought a long time ago came in blue but we couldn't get it, but we laughed.

The mother-in-law has not been here for many years, the estrangement (due to her violent tendencies) brought me peace and tranquility. He died two years ago. I thought the other day trying to find a happy memory of her. This is the closest I have to that. He intended to insult me ​​and instead gave us lots of laughs.

A few years after moving here, the mother-in-law decorated her kitchen with strawberries. Everything had a strawberry, chairs, trinkets, wallpaper, plates, glasses, tea towels, pictures, salt and pepper shakers and curtains. She pointed it out and told me that she put up the wallpaper herself. I said, "I guess you really like berries."

He finally dropped the blue comments after about ten years, when my husband mentioned to him that we thought he was hysterical.

I'm still trying to find a good memory of her.

Sometimes it is better to leave an interview before it begins.

I applied for a Retail Sales Professional position at a Comcast store. After going through the first layers of hoops, the recruiter arranged an interview for me.

I arrived at the store 15 minutes before my scheduled interview with two copies of my resume as indicated in the interview confirmation email. I immediately checked in with a representative at the first customer service desk, and he entered my name into the computer and advised me to sit in the waiting area. At approximately 11:54 am, a young man in ag

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Sometimes it is better to leave an interview before it begins.

I applied for a Retail Sales Professional position at a Comcast store. After going through the first layers of hoops, the recruiter arranged an interview for me.

I arrived at the store 15 minutes before my scheduled interview with two copies of my resume as indicated in the interview confirmation email. I immediately checked in with a representative at the first customer service desk, and he entered my name into the computer and advised me to sit in the waiting area. At approximately 11:54 a.m., a young man in a gray shirt and tie emerged from the secured area at the back of the store as he shook the manager's hand and smiled. The door closed behind him, the young man left, and I kept waiting. At 12:20 pm, no one had come to speak to me, so I walked to the front of the store and spoke with omitted, the person named in the recruiter's email as a potential interviewer. I told him that I had been waiting since 11: 45am and no one had come to speak to me. and claimed it was because they were interviewing someone else at the time. I asked him, "You mean the young man in the gray shirt and tie who has already left?" He looked at me quite confused and said he would go check it out. He entered the secured area at the back of the store and came out again a little over a minute later, hastily saying, "They're about to call you back." Then I waited another 3 minutes. At that point I felt that they had forgotten me, which indicated that they must have hired someone for the position, that they were not properly following their schedule, or that the scheduled interview with me was simply not important to them. I felt disrespected, that my time and efforts were wasted, and I left, politely advising omitted that " I am canceling the interview at this time. Thanks."

I found this experience disrespectful considering the effort I had put into preparing for the interview and properly following the recruiter's. Also, I found experience to be an indication that there may be some issues with management within that location that would make it a problematic workplace. I was not greeted when I entered the store, and although I was very polite, friendly and positive, my pleasant demeanor was not reciprocated and I left feeling as if my presence was a burden to everyone who interacted.

In the 47 minutes that I was in that store, not a single employee initiated contact with me. It was like he was a ghost. I can't imagine it's easy to miss a 6'2 "blonde woman in professional business attire in a small store full of people in casual attire. I never saw a single employee smile.

To put this experience into perspective, imagine if I had been hired at this store (or any other employer) and I was 15 minutes late for my scheduled shift, and the only excuse I provided was, "I didn't know I was supposed to be here", or "I forgot my schedule." This would absolutely result in disciplinary action at any place of employment, up to and including termination. My suspicion is that the manager of that store would not tolerate such carelessness, unprofessional delay and negligence on the part of his staff.

I have over 20 years of customer service and security experience, most of it in high stress situations. One thing that all those years of experience taught me is that what I experienced and observed in that store was anything but professional.

In the end, it was probably a fake interview anyway. Companies have to interview so many outsiders for a job, even when they've already chosen someone from the inside before the ad was placed.

If the interviewer makes you wait more than 15 minutes, especially without even bothering to tell you that there is some kind of delay (such as a run-down meeting or a major problem with the client), just walk away. They are wasting your time and it is a strong indicator that the place is managed like land and that it will be treated like garbage.

I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Who cares, anyway, what they want to talk about

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I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Anyway, who cares what they want to talk about? This was so bad in so many ways - you can't improve your language skills just by checking the correct answer on the test, you won't develop an English narrative if you are never invited to write stories and have them revised, and YES, I actually do care what people want to talk about. I got up and left, saying that I was afraid I would not agree with their "teaching" system.

The elegant company with exploitative salaries

Years later, she was going through interviews as a secretary or assistant in import-export, marketing, and other departments where she had experience. I can't really remember which of those two positions this company had openings at the time. I came to this huge office in a tall building, overlooking the city. Great views, solid but modern furniture, pretty impressive setup. They made me wait more than half an hour before starting the interview, but they gave me a brochure about the company to review while I was waiting. It also seemed expensive: the quality of the paper itself, the good design ...

When we got to the interview, they were interested in my qualifications and my experience and said that I was going to be selected for the final round of interviews. Salary had never been mentioned, so I asked boldly as they had been giving all kinds of details about themselves and the success of the company. The pay sucked! It was already a low salary for the position itself, even worse considering the aura of luxury they were trying to express. As soon as they said how much they would be paying for this "crucial position in our company" I looked into their eyes one by one as if I couldn't believe what I had just heard, I said "I guess you spent too much on this table and now you can't pay a decent salary, ”she grabbed my bag and left.

The Horrible Jewelry Company You've Always Hated

During roughly the same period, I went through 2 rounds of interviews for a management assistant position in which they had not disclosed which company I was hiring. This happened quite frequently among international companies that hired in Barcelona over a given period, and I really don't know why these companies preferred to reveal their names only in the final rounds. Regardless, the job description was interesting and the pay this time was good. Several other things that I had on my priority list were also fulfilled: occasional flexibility in working hours if needed, few business trips as I am a single mother ... The interview ended with the recruiter happily shaking my hand and saying that I would call a possibly final round of interviews, where the company name would be revealed. She said, with a big smile, "I really can't tell you,

NO!!! I've always hated that company and that silly design! I almost screamed "You don't mean shit, do you?" and she smiled and nodded. I said, “Sorry, I couldn't work for them. Those designs are horrible! ”. And I left.

It's no wonder I'm having trouble making ends meet, but I've been working for 14 years at a research institution, doing the kind of work I love and with people I appreciate. I guess I won.

Human Resources chose this guy to interview. If I had a choice, I wouldn't have bothered based on your resume. I found about a dozen spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors on his resume. And I'm talking about ridiculous things. I mean, if you read some of my answers, then you will know that my written English skills are not 100%, so if I see them, it must be bad. I think Houston misspelled at one point. Ridiculous things like that.

When I read your resume, I checked and corrected everything in red ink. Just because I was bored.

So when it comes time for his interview, he is not here. I am the

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Human Resources chose this guy to interview. If I had a choice, I wouldn't have bothered based on your resume. I found about a dozen spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors on his resume. And I'm talking about ridiculous things. I mean, if you read some of my answers, then you will know that my written English skills are not 100%, so if I see them, it must be bad. I think Houston misspelled at one point. Ridiculous things like that.

When I read your resume, I checked and corrected everything in red ink. Just because I was bored.

So when it comes time for his interview, he is not here. I'm the first person to interview him, so I sit down for 10 minutes and then go back to my desk. 10 minutes later HR calls me and says he's here and I can come down and talk to him. I told the guy who was interviewing him next to give me a few minutes, as he was late. But, he really didn't need it.

In almost any interview or engineering-related position, at least in my field, the candidate should be the best dressed person in the room. This boy was not.

Jeans, tennis shoes, plaid shirt (not tucked in) and wallet with chain.

So what has this child told me about himself before he even said a word to me?

  1. I am careless and / or incompetent.
  2. I don't value your time.
  3. I am not interested in a professional position.

I wasn't going to do it, but after about 2 questions I gave him back his corrected resume and left.

Needless to say, he didn't get the job.

*Edit*

A few people have commented on my statement regarding her outfit.

When we interview, we do not specify a dress code for the interview and candidates are free to wear whatever they want. For this particular job, he had 21 qualified candidates, all with roughly the same experience and education. 20 of those candidates showed up in a suit and tie and 1 showed up in jeans and sneakers.

"Well Eric, he could have been a FANTASTIC engineer who simply lacked social skills or couldn't afford new clothes."

OK fair enough. But he's already in the negative column three times before he opens his mouth. He had 20 other equally fantastic engineers to choose from, all of whom put in an effort. Why should I choose the one who didn't?

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