Can I get a visa without a title for the USA?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Guillermo Stokes



Can I get a visa without a title for the USA?

Yes, but you will need the equivalent number (some say twice) of years working in the field of what you would have spent doing the job and you will also need a specialist to certify that the work you list on your resume qualifies as experience equivalent to a degree which means even more expenses for the employer trying to get your visa

This happened to me, I did not have a degree (but a 2-year diploma) and the lawyers from the sponsoring company had to get an academic professor to certify that the work on my resume was of equal value.

The lack of grade came back to bite me in the GC application when

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Yes, but you will need the equivalent number (some say twice) of years working in the field of what you would have spent doing the job and you will also need a specialist to certify that the work you list on your resume qualifies as experience equivalent to a degree which means even more expenses for the employer trying to get your visa

This happened to me, I did not have a degree (but a 2-year diploma) and the lawyers from the sponsoring company had to get an academic professor to certify that the work on my resume was of equal value.

The lack of title bit back on the GC application as it was considered to be an EB3 rather than an EB2 so if you have plans for GreenCard it might be worth getting a title while I still have H1B status.

There are several NON-immigrant visas that you can obtain without a title, such as a visitor visa or a visa to do seasonal work as a farm worker or pool lifeguard, or if the temporary suspension imposed by former President Trump is lifted, as a pair.

As for permanent resident visas (green cards), you do not need a title to obtain one if your U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse or immediate relative applies for it, or if you meet the requirements to be considered a refugee or asylum seeker.

If you can -

There is a 3-year rule of thumb that states that every 3 years of relevant work experience can be counted as 1 year of college.

Since the H1B visa requires at least 4 years of bachelor's degree to qualify, this translates to roughly 12 years of work experience.

I read somewhere now 4 years of work experience counts as 1 year of college degree and this translates to roughly 16 years of work experience in total.

Also the tricky part is evaluating work experience; there are many factors here; but in the general evaluation of the university professor who teaches and grades the relative degree course work fr

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If you can -

There is a 3-year rule of thumb that states that every 3 years of relevant work experience can be counted as 1 year of college.

Since the H1B visa requires at least 4 years of bachelor's degree to qualify, this translates to roughly 12 years of work experience.

I read somewhere now 4 years of work experience counts as 1 year of college degree and this translates to roughly 16 years of work experience in total.

Also the tricky part is evaluating work experience; there are many factors here; But in general, an evaluation is needed from the university professor who teaches and grades the course work for a relevant degree from a reputable institute at a minimum.

But keep in mind that sometimes this may not be enough, because immigration can still challenge many factors with some being very complicated, such as; the assessment is based on the data provided rather than having observed the petitioner in the work environment.

Yes, during my experience in the immigration field, I once came across a student who applied for the ESL program and was issued his visa, to my surprise it was that the student had not even passed his twelfth grade and had applied about the base of your tenth. .

The student had come to meet with me to discuss how he can continue his career, I suggested that he apply for an Associate / Diploma degree after his ESL program.

If you need a tourist visa or an unskilled worker visa, be our guest.

If you need a skilled worker visa, the answer is "no."

If you have a lot of money and need an investor visa, be our guest.

Of course he can.

It depends on what you mean by "get it," but I'm going to assume you mean something above the minimum wage and probably closer to the median US income of $ 50,000 / year.

There is a saying that goes like this:

"The more you go to school, the more likely you are to work for someone else."

I think the reverse is also true, the less you go to school, the more likely it is that you will not work for someone else. Let me give you an example.

As an employer, if I am going to hire a web designer, I will probably narrow my options by requiring a college degree in my job description. Now suppose that instead of hiring a

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It depends on what you mean by "get it," but I'm going to assume you mean something above the minimum wage and probably closer to the median US income of $ 50,000 / year.

There is a saying that goes like this:

"The more you go to school, the more likely you are to work for someone else."

I think the reverse is also true, the less you go to school, the more likely it is that you will not work for someone else. Let me give you an example.

As an employer, if I am going to hire a web designer, I will probably narrow my options by requiring a college degree in my job description. Now suppose that instead of hiring a web designer as an employee, I want to hire a web design company, maybe a company of one, for a project. Nowhere in my experience would I ask an entrepreneur if he had a college degree, I just want to see his previous work and a proposal - the discussion begins and ends with work and fees. End of story.

So my answer to your question is as follows. To "succeed" as an employee, it is enormously difficult in the US to succeed without a college degree. That's only the reality in 2017. However, as a “company” or a freelancer, in my opinion, there are many more opportunities.

A third option is to pursue a career in a trade (plumbing, carpentry, electricians, welding), which requires some training / certification, but does not require the same investment in terms of time and money as a college degree. And in many cases, a career can be more lucrative than “college degree” jobs.

If you haven't done it before, I suggest you take an MBTI assessment online (free). My favorite sites are Quistic dot com and 16personalities dot com. Maybe you should also take the StrenthsQuest dot com assessment (it's not free, but it's inexpensive). The resulting information will help you identify your unique strengths / talents and assess your plans from a position where you understand who and what you are. Don't worry, it's not deterministic, just information.

Good luck! And I sincerely hope you “make it”!

I suggest you get a bachelor's degree (and a master's degree) to make yourself valuable (to the job market, not as a person. Don't misunderstand my words).

You need a visa, but to get it you need:

  • Show that you can support yourself financially. In other words, you must show that you will not become a burden to the country.
  • It must be valuable enough that a company decides to hire you instead of a US citizen. What can make it hard to find in an American citizen? What skills, abilities, and credentials do you have? What can you offer the US?

Every fiscal year (October 1 - September

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I suggest you get a bachelor's degree (and a master's degree) to make yourself valuable (to the job market, not as a person. Don't misunderstand my words).

You need a visa, but to get it you need:

  • Show that you can support yourself financially. In other words, you must show that you will not become a burden to the country.
  • It must be valuable enough that a company decides to hire you instead of a US citizen. What can make it hard to find in an American citizen? What skills, abilities, and credentials do you have? What can you offer the US?

Each fiscal year (October 1 to September 30), approximately 140,000 employment-based immigrant visas are available to qualified applicants under the provisions of US immigration law. Employment-based immigrant visas are divided in different categories by PREFERENCE:

  1. Employment First Preference (E1): Priority workers who are individuals of extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business or athletics, outstanding professors and researchers with at least three years of experience in teaching or research, who are recognized international and multinational managers or executives who have been employed for at least one of the previous three years by the foreign affiliate, parent, subsidiary, or branch of the U.S. employer.
  2. Second Employment Preference (E2): Professionals with advanced degrees and individuals of exceptional ability who are Professionals with an advanced degree (beyond a baccalaureate degree) or a baccalaureate degree and at least five years of progressive experience in the profession and Persons of exceptional ability in the sciences, arts, or business. Exceptional ability means having a significantly higher degree of experience than is normally found in the sciences, arts, or business.
  3. Third Employment Preference (E3): Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Unskilled Workers (Other Workers)
  4. Fourth job preference (E4): certain special immigrants

You don't want to be the short man on the totem pole.

140,000 is not a lot, so you need to show that you deserve a spot.

Employment-based immigrant visa

Work in the U.S. - Visas and Employment Authorization - AllLaw.com

Permanent workers

Working in the USA

Perhaps my answer to a similar question can help you: How can I get a visa to live and work in the US if I don't have a degree?

But right off the bat, I can tell you that to increase your chances of getting a visa, you have to work towards a bachelor's or master's degree. There are a limited number of visas that are granted each year, and your chances of obtaining one are tied to the job preference category you are in:

  1. First Job Preference (E1): Priority Workers
  2. Second Job Preference (E2): Professionals with advanced degrees and individuals with exceptional abilities
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Perhaps my answer to a similar question can help you: How can I get a visa to live and work in the US if I don't have a degree?

But right off the bat, I can tell you that to increase your chances of getting a visa, you have to work towards a bachelor's or master's degree. There are a limited number of visas that are granted each year, and your chances of obtaining one are tied to the job preference category you are in:

  1. First Job Preference (E1): Priority Workers
  2. Second Job Preference (E2): Professionals with advanced degrees and individuals with exceptional abilities
  3. Third Employment Preference (E3): Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Unskilled Workers (Other Workers)
  4. Fourth job preference (E4): certain special immigrants

You must have a certain level of experience in your chosen field to have a better chance. In other words, it needs to make itself more valuable to the job market. You need to have something to offer.

To increase your value, think of yourself as a 'product' and 'upgrade' yourself every year

Good luck.

For the H-1B, if you don't have at least a bachelor's degree in a field related to your position, then you can qualify for:

  • Have an unrestricted state license, registration, or certification authorizing you to fully practice the specialty occupation and immediately participate in that specialty in the state of intended employment; or
  • Have education, specialized training, and / or progressively responsible experience that is equivalent to completion of a U.S. bachelor's degree or higher degree in the specialty occupation, and have recognition of specialty experience through advancement.
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For the H-1B, if you don't have at least a bachelor's degree in a field related to your position, then you can qualify for:

  • Have an unrestricted state license, registration, or certification authorizing you to fully practice the specialty occupation and immediately participate in that specialty in the state of intended employment; or
  • Have education, specialized training and / or progressively responsible experience that is equivalent to the completion of a U.S. bachelor's or higher degree in the specialty occupation, and have recognition of specialty experience through progressive positions of responsibility directly related to the specialty. In general, 3 years of work experience or training in the field is considered equivalent to 1 year of college.

You should be aware that even if your H-1B qualifications are impeccable, you are not guaranteed to be selected in the H-1B visa lottery. Unfortunately, there are fewer (about half) new H-1B visas available each year than are applied for. In other words, your H-1B chances are influenced not just by your grades but luck as well.

Regarding the L-1 visa option, it is true that you do not necessarily need a bachelor's degree, but you must meet a number of other requirements. In addition to having worked for the company for at least a year in the last three, you would need 1 or 2 as follows:
1) Executive ability generally refers to the employee's ability to make wide-margin decisions without much supervision.
OR
Managerial ability generally refers to the employee's ability to supervise and control the work of professional employees and to manage the organization, or a department, subdivision, function, or component of the organization. It can also refer to the employee's ability to manage an essential function of the organization at a high level, without the direct supervision of others.
2) Specialized knowledge means special knowledge that an individual possesses of the product, service, research, equipment, techniques, administration or other interests of the applicant organization and its application in international markets, or an advanced level of knowledge or experience in the processes of the organization. and procedures.

Your best option would be to consult with an immigration attorney to discuss your particular background and goals.

Good luck for you!

Just this year, at the age of 35, I was asked to provide proof that I had graduated from a prospective employer's high school. I told them that I did not have a physical copy of my diploma and that I had gone to school in Canada (I live in the US now), so it might be difficult to get one (as it turns out, people from my old school high school was exceptionally useless here). I went back to that job and told them that I would have to decline their offer as I couldn't prove that I had graduated from high school. It wasn't a big deal as I was in paid employment at the time and was just looking

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Just this year, at the age of 35, I was asked to provide proof that I had graduated from a prospective employer's high school. I told them that I did not have a physical copy of my diploma and that I had gone to school in Canada (I live in the US now), so it might be difficult to get one (as it turns out, people from my old school high school was exceptionally useless here). I went back to that job and told them that I would have to decline their offer as I couldn't prove that I had graduated from high school. It wasn't a big deal as I was in paid employment at the time and was just looking for a job closer to home.

That job has contacted me three or four times since then, telling me that they are willing to ignore my lack of diploma (or, at least, proof of it) in order to hire me.

Moral (s) of the story: Virtually no one will ask you if you have a diploma and if you are good at what you do and your trade is in demand, even those who theoretically require a high school diploma will waive the requirement. At least in my experience. I just guess, but government jobs and very large corporations could be more rigid in this regard.

It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. Would mean and

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It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. It would mean that you remained curious, focused, driven by results, and most importantly, you didn't waste it all on something destructive. You always kept your eyes on a higher goal.

So that's what employers are looking for in the people they hire. They seek, in a word, PASSION and PROOF OF PASSION.

You can do it! Forget about excuses, show people your PROOF OF PASSION and the world will open its doors to you.

Good luck.

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