Can I get a job with just HTML?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Sam Dawson



Can I get a job with just HTML?

No. You need more skills ... HTML is not even a programming language, it is basically a markup language for structuring web pages.

If you want a job as a web developer you must learn other technologies such as

HTML5 (if you don't already know it)

CSS3

Bootstrap (for quick-response layout pages)

Javascript

After this, you can decide to move to the backend, but there are many options here, such as learning Python, PHP, or Node, so it is up to you to choose which platform you would like to work with. But no, I don't think you can get any job with just HTML knowledge.

Probably not. Don't let that put you off, but HTML alone isn't very powerful. With HTML, you simply get a website with text that is presented in a certain way.

If you add CSS into the mix, you get a colorful website that can look great.

Add JavaScript and suddenly you can do a lot of magic tricks on the website.

Add a backend language like C # to the mix and then you can get data on that website.

Add SQL to get that data.

Developers need to know a variety of different languages. The more you know, the better you will be. :)

In my opinion, it is not easy to get work with only HTML

HTML is very common. Even fifth graders can learn tags and go to HTML.

So, I advise you instead of just trying HTML to go for PHP as well because it would help you increase your skill level and get a satisfying income job.

But I wouldn't say stop learning after PHP keeps learning more and keeps growing.

Never know that you could be the best web developer in the future.

Good luck!!

No, unfortunately, otherwise my kids might pay the rent (just kidding)

HTML is an essential skill for web development, but it is only a small part of what you need to know.

HTML is just markup. CSS will make it look good, JavaScript will add some flavor and a backend language and a database (I use c # server and ms sql)

My advice would be to keep learning. With enough hard work and determination, you will get to where you need to be on time, so be patient.

Just HTML? No!

The least you would need is CSS as well, and only for non-development positions, like layout. But really, you probably wouldn't be the one to get the job if that's all you have.

There are many factors at play here, so I will share my personal experience. I am based in the USA I started my career as a freelancer building simple static websites in HTML, CSS, with a dash of Javascript. A typical website that took me 10-20 hours would make me around $ 250-500. I got most of my clients through Craigslist or through friends and family. As I progressed, I started to learn PHP / MySQL, Javascript, JQuery, and in recent years frameworks like React and Laravel. I have a degree in computer science, so designing and building applications is more of one of my strengths than building n

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There are many factors at play here, so I will share my personal experience. I am based in the USA I started my career as a freelancer building simple static websites in HTML, CSS, with a dash of Javascript. A typical website that took me 10-20 hours would make me around $ 250-500. I got most of my clients through Craigslist or through friends and family. As I progressed, I started to learn PHP / MySQL, Javascript, JQuery, and in recent years frameworks like React and Laravel. I have a degree in computer science, so designing and building applications is more one of my strengths than creating attractive websites (although if I could do it all over again I would have skipped college and learned everything myself; I had already passed AP Calculus and Science courses by the time I finished high school and the useful skills I learned in college I could have easily learned in 6 to 12 months, and I could have spent the remaining time becoming an expert at things like that. , would have tangible effects on my ability to generate income). These days I have left behind the days of creating simple websites and now I create web applications. This has allowed me to earn much more income, sometimes more than $ 200,000 per year. I don't get work from sites like Upwork. The good, high-performing clients with big budgets usually go through big-name agencies and most of my work now is on agency contract. I went from being a freelancer to essentially being a part-time employee of two agencies, and they give me steady work. I know of other developers here in the US who build web apps independently, and none of them make less than $ 100k / yr unless they are having a slow year. Keep in mind that here in the US at least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees full of a company pay much more in taxes and health. safe. I know of other developers here in the US who build web apps independently, and none of them make less than $ 100k / yr unless they are having a slow year. Please note that here in the US At least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is likely equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees of a company pay much more in taxes and health. safe. I know of other developers here in the US who build web apps independently, and none of them make less than $ 100k / yr unless they are having a slow year. Keep in mind that here in the US at least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees full of a company pay much more in taxes and health. safe. At least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees of a company pay much more in taxes and health . safe. I know of other developers here in the US who build web apps independently, and none of them make less than $ 100k / yr unless they are having a slow year. Keep in mind that here in the US at least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees full of a company pay much more in taxes and health. safe. At least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees of a company pay much more in taxes and health . safe. I know of other developers here in the US who build web apps independently, and none of them make less than $ 100k / yr unless they are having a slow year. Keep in mind that here in the US at least earning $ 100k / year as a freelancer is probably equivalent to a full-time job with benefits that pays a salary of $ 70k / year because people who are not full-time employees full of a company pay much more in taxes and health. safe.

I have been a consultant for 2 years, doing mostly HTML and CSS. Also, I have earned substantial income doing so. You can also get a good chunk of cash just by knowing HTML and CSS.

To get there, I needed to figure out how to use other advanced instruments like Expression Engine, which relies on a php structure. I don't do PHP. I just follow the documentation and use quality modules. I don't code any JS. I use modules and adjust them to my requirements following guidelines.

In the event you need genuine back-end software

Keep reading

I have been a consultant for 2 years, doing mostly HTML and CSS. Also, I have earned substantial income doing so. You can also get a good chunk of cash just by knowing HTML and CSS.

To get there, I needed to figure out how to use other advanced instruments like Expression Engine, which relies on a php structure. I don't do PHP. I just follow the documentation and use quality modules. I don't code any JS. I use modules and adjust them to my requirements following guidelines.

In case you need a genuine back-end software engineer, hire one for part of the company. Try not to try to do everything yourself. You will sit and collect. What's more, the work may be done ineffectively.

Get acquainted with a particular region (like Front-End Design if that's what you really like) and use frameworks that help you assemble more developed sites for which you can charge higher expenses and for which you can offer month-to-month maintenance. .

Another thing where you should be acceptable (especially if you are outsourcing) is business arrangement and customer relationships.

By understanding customer center requirements and offering a master UI of UI and UX tips, you will have the option to build a connection that is trusted and considerate by your customers.

Browse a couple of good books on selling, on the most effective method to build an amazing proposition, how to be considered by clients (so that you don't work like a slave, but an accomplice in a task). These are much easier to learn than PHP, but are sometimes difficult to apply in reality. It will take practice, but once your first huge proposal is recognized, the next one will only get bigger ...

I am still a front-end developer. But on the other hand, I am a decent finance manager and have figured out how to build amazing client relationships while offering my skill at a more exorbitant cost.

Plus, you can do it too!

It's not so much about the programming language. Developers are obsessed with programming languages.

It's more about experience related to the type of work you want to do.

Start with this and look at the job postings for the type of role. Look at the programming languages ​​that seem to come up the most. Then go from there.

  • Learn JavaScript if you want to participate in front-end development. But learn some design skills as well - UX may be a different role in the main one, but if you achieve both design / layout in CSS, JavaScript (especially responsive / JQuery libraries etc) and HTML then you have a head
Keep reading

It's not so much about the programming language. Developers are obsessed with programming languages.

It's more about experience related to the type of work you want to do.

Start with this and look at the job postings for the type of role. Look at the programming languages ​​that seem to come up the most. Then go from there.

  • Learn JavaScript if you want to participate in front-end development. But learn some design skills as well - UX may be a different role in the main one, but if you achieve both design / layout in CSS, JavaScript (especially responsive / JQuery libraries etc) and HTML, then you already have a head start. . Learn node.js too and this opens up a way to use javascript on the back end for web servers, scripting, build management, desktop and mobile development, etc. You can also use it to build browser plugins. Javascript is truly a must-have for developers today. It's a good idea to learn a front-end framework like Angular, React, or Vue as well to understand the front-end driven approach to app development, becoming more popular as it helps to further separate the front-end from the back-end. effectively.
  • If you want to get into corporate website development, choose Java. And learn a little JavaScript to understand where problems can occur, particularly around asynchronous web services. Spring MVC and Spring Core are essential for this, and Spring Boot is a great way to speed up a project (comparable in focus to Ruby on Rails but with more enterprise-level support). For midsize businesses, Ruby on Rails, C #, and Python with Django are good to know. For start-ups, node.js (JavaScript) with Express is popular as it is very quick to learn and expand.
  • If you want to work with small businesses, learn PHP and how to customize WordPress. Learn about the LAMP stack, in particular learn about Apache redirects / rewrites, they appear like a Swiss army knife all the time (which is good for all types of businesses you can work with, for things like SEO redirects). Nginx is also popular for this.
  • If you're interested in data science (big data if you want), Python has a good set of libraries that deal with this, and of course you need to learn R, particularly useful for statistics and machine learning concepts. You can learn hadoop if you want to process large data sets through pipelines, but this is evolving so fast that hadoop is quickly becoming obsolete; I see Apache Spark & ​​Storm more and more nowadays.
  • In mobile applications? Well that's moving so fast it's hard to know where to go. Everyone uses open source in their mobile language; the only one that was open source to begin with was Android, so maybe that's a good bet. Otherwise you would skip Objective-C and go straight to Swift for iOS and Java for Android.
  • Do you want to build on multiple types of mobile devices or multiple desktop environments at the same time? Many companies are now doing this to reach a larger market without having to recode everything. It is advisable to learn JavaScript if you are building cross-platform applications, as there are several frameworks that use it for cross-platform development, for example, React Native, Cordova, Ionic, and NativeScript. It may also be worth learning C # if you are going to use Microsoft's Xamarin set of cross-platform development tools, which has been around for a long time. You may want to explore Electron / nw.js for cross-platform desktop development which again requires familiarity with Javascript.
  • Integrated programming your thing? Or systems software? Want to code for small but ubiquitous devices as we enter the age of the Internet of Things? For the sake of speed, people still go straight to C as it is closer to the underlying assembly language of the operating system. However, increasingly, operating systems can accommodate very small devices, so it may be increasingly unnecessary to develop them at this level. However, if you really want to know what's going on in great detail, or want to tune the performance of something to the nth degree (for example, with highly transactional banking or business systems), then C is a must. It is also what most other languages ​​are based on.
  • There are also others: Scala (functional but not rigid), Perl (kind of legacy), Ruby (again more used for web applications), Clojure (for highly scalable and parallelizable systems; however, it has a lot of competition), Groovy (used a lot for scripting as a kind of high-level replacement for bash, for example, Gradle for dependency management and builds), and Go (fast, compact, basic for Google's strategy), etc.

Remember though: the more popular the language, the easier it will be to get a job, so it's a good option if you're just starting out. But the pay scales will not be good.

The less popular the language, the more difficult it will be to get a job, but the greater the demand for someone with good knowledge. A good choice when you've managed to learn the skills in another job, ready to prepare to switch jobs (or using it on open source projects in your spare time is fine too, but this doesn't prove you can apply it in a work environment).

If you want to get ahead and stand out from the next interviewee, learn these developmental aspects too. It will propel you forward in your career:

  • Whatever you do, learn the language of design patterns. It gives you a common language to talk to other developers and stands out as someone who can tackle a problem in a systematic way. Learn how to apply those design patterns in the language of your choice.
  • Learn a bit about architecture: application servers, web servers, load balancers, and if you want to be in high demand, learn about AWS architecture. This is a language unto itself, but you can see how your development options relate to architectural decisions. Register with your own account. Since you will have virtually no traffic, it won't cost much (when using a startup account anyway), but you can learn how to set up an infrastructure for a development environment. Azure is another good option to check out, as it is now getting a good chunk of market share. And maybe the Google application server, especially if you want to integrate well with Google applications.
  • Learn development approaches: Scrum, Configuration Management (making sure you know how you can configure an environment in a systematic way), Internationalization so that your applications can be used by other language speakers, When and why would you use databases, Usage of repositories for version control, when to share code within a team (or multiple teams), usually using git these days. Systematize Your Approach to Development Using These Principles
  • Learn about SEO - the basics of what you need to cover on a website to be ranked by search engines, as well as genuine good practices to help people find you through other sites. Knowing the basics here means that you can speak a language that not everyone fully understands. Remember that the websites are available in multiple countries and in multiple languages, and that gives you an edge over some of the considerations. Otherwise it's basic like canonical tags, sitemaps, robots.txt, ensuring every page has dynamic data, using nofollow links appropriately, and having meaningful meta tags.
  • Learn more about security concepts - Using https everywhere and cross-site scripting is just the tip of the iceberg, so set aside some time to familiarize yourself with common tricks and how to avoid exposing your code to them. in their development patterns. Usually a prewritten library or two is used. Remember personal privacy when considering this as well, making sure you don't accidentally leak personal data when using calls to third-party providers, for example. And be sure to delete the data when it is no longer needed.
  • Tests, tests, tests. It's not just about test coverage. It's about making sure all boundary conditions are tested for unit testing, setting up and tearing down a common environment to make everyone's life easier for integration or MVC testing, and acceptance tests are more and more commonly written in code: see Geb as an example of this.
  • Dependency and compilation mechanisms: Each language has its own mechanism to help compile your code in a structured way in your final application, ensuring that the libraries it depends on (and the libraries your libraries depend on) are compiled with the correct versions. For example, Java has Maven and Ivy, and JavaScript has npm, webpack, and many others.
  • CI: Continuous Integration is a way to allow developers to continue development and automatically compile, test, and deploy code, at best, so that fixes and even features are deployed the same day. Jenkins is worth learning at least as this seems to be one of the most popular frameworks. This will put you well ahead of most developers and many architects. Particularly if you find the repository, the architecture and the development part of the development interesting.
  • SQL is useful - Veterans still know how to use it, but not everyone knows it these days. It is still the ubiquitous way of talking to databases. Even NoSQL engines are creating ways to use it to take advantage of this ubiquity.
  • Integration is ubiquitous. Now that everything is cloud-based, you need to make sure that you can connect everything effectively. REST-based APIs are the least you need to understand. Something like Mulesoft is a good all-rounder for enterprise-level integration work - the idea is that you don't make the systems adapt to each other, but rather put an integration layer in between to mediate communication and take over during high capacity times.
  • Learn about containerization with products like Docker. This has become ubiquitous and is widely used in CI (to 'speed up' build environments quickly without having the overhead of activating a machine or operating system) and even in production environments, where it is being used effectively as a kind of building blocks. approach to configuration management and, together with management platforms such as Kuberenetes, scale the capacity required for rapidly changing demand.

You really should know more about the "why" you want to get a job in the field. When I started looking for work on the web, I thought the same thing and started asking the same questions. But what is the required competency for the job you want? Is it web design or web development (totally different) and is it front-end or back-end? The answer can be difficult because HTML / css / js is much more confusing than you might think. Just asking that question that way makes it clear that you don't yet know the scope of "CSS" and "JS" to get a job as a developer. (But don't let my words stop.

Keep reading

You really should know more about the "why" you want to get a job in the field. When I started looking for work on the web, I thought the same thing and started asking the same questions. But what is the required competency for the job you want? Is it web design or web development (totally different) and is it front-end or back-end? The answer can be difficult because HTML / css / js is much more confusing than you might think. Just asking that question that way makes it clear that you don't yet know the scope of "CSS" and "JS" to get a job as a developer. (But don't let my words stop you from trying because who knows !?)

It probably sounds daunting, but don't quit. Keep your head up where you are and, as suggested, start working on something. Codecademy, Codeschool, Treehouse, Pluralsight, and many others offer great resources and several free online classes to get you to the point of being employable. I suggest you start looking at every web page with devtools open and start using github right away.

The strongest skills you'll need to get into web development that you don't yet realize you need are git (usually Github or Sourcetree) and bug reporting. (Typically Bugzilla or JIRA) you want to understand source control, version control, and teamwork. You are not the developer. Your TEAM is the "developer" and the most employable skill is the knowledge of how to work in a team. They don't teach you that online. I can't tell you how many times I wanted to show off "my coding skills" that were probably employable, but I didn't have the teamwork knowledge to go along with it. Every job opportunity you go to will say "what's your github?" and they will test you with questions like "

Just a few tips besides "how much html / css / js you should know". I hope it helps you, no one took the time to tell me these things in detail, maybe it will help you in the ways that I didn't have it to help me.

Perhaps the best way to ask the question would be: "Why can I get paid a lot of money that is really easy to learn?"

If coding, applicable coding, were so easy to learn, it wouldn't be of value. That's like asking someone to pay you to tie your shoelaces.

People can sit here and say they can learn x in 3 months, which is really only half true. You can learn a lot in a couple of months, but there is a big difference between learning enough French to order a meal and enough to write a best-selling novel in France. The same goes for encoding; You can learn enough to put together a

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Perhaps the best way to ask the question would be: "Why can I get paid a lot of money that is really easy to learn?"

If coding, applicable coding, were so easy to learn, it wouldn't be of value. That's like asking someone to pay you to tie your shoelaces.

People can sit here and say they can learn x in 3 months, which is really only half true. You can learn a lot in a couple of months, but there is a big difference between learning enough French to order a meal and enough to write a best-selling novel in France. The same goes for encoding; You can learn enough to put together a quick site, but it will be something anyone can develop in a few hours through a WordPress template without even knowing it's bloated, security issues, patch dependency, scalability, maintenance issues, etc. .

I don't agree with people dismissing the power and complexities of any of what you listed. The most important is HTML / CSS. Without a good understanding of the role of HTML in the DOM, you will surely write things that date back to 1993 in terms of readability and bloat. As for CSS, take a look at the back end of the sites that win awards at the CSS Design Awards and you will see that there is a lot to look forward to.

If you want to develop, I beg you to TAKE YOUR TIME !!!

  • Running through things will make you hate coding. You don't want to hate what you want to earn a living with.
  • You won't become a good coder rushing through all the ideas, syntax, and algorithms you need to know to be acceptable. Coding requires precision, rushing encourages mistakes and half-understanding.
  • You are likely to collect LESS when in a rush.
  • Some concepts take time to assimilate, even with a lot of practice. Ask people about callbacks and promises and you will see what I mean.

If you're trying to make ends meet, get a part-time job or something else while you study coding. Give yourself time not only to learn to code, but to find your place in the world of coding. It is a large and evolving place and if you have no idea how to navigate it, you will lose a lot of time.

My advice:

  • I'd like to add a caveat to the "always keep learning" trivia. Always keep learning something useful for you. Everything you encounter on your journey IS NOT necessarily valuable or useful for what you are trying to achieve.
  • Look for free coding educational resources first, then pay. There are more free resources than you might think. It would be foolish to ignore them.
  • Keep in mind that sometimes you HAVE to pay because there simply isn't a better resource.
  • Recognize that there are great instructors at large institutions (eg, MIT, Stanford), but there are also great instructors OUTSIDE of them. Udemy and Udacity are two very good resources in my book.
  • Recognize that there are lousy instructors in large institutions and outside of them.
  • Take time, especially when you feel exhausted. You will make the robots because you ARE NOT a robot.
  • If you're half decent, help someone out and don't be a jerk to newbies. Everyone starts at the bottom and needs help.

What kinds of jobs can you get if you are good with HTML and CSS?

Hi Thilan,
Well HTML and CSS are what make the website look like a website.

You must know the difference between a header and a body or how to separate the main content from the sidebar and the footer as you are good with HTML and CSS.

You must also know the syntax and metadata contained in an HTML page for it to work properly for linking to other files, javascript, and CSS.

You should also have a good understanding of valid W3C codes and formats.

You should also know that having optimized images and formatting will speed up loading

Keep reading

What kinds of jobs can you get if you are good with HTML and CSS?

Hi Thilan,
Well HTML and CSS are what make the website look like a website.

You must know the difference between a header and a body or how to separate the main content from the sidebar and the footer as you are good with HTML and CSS.

You must also know the syntax and metadata contained in an HTML page for it to work properly for linking to other files, javascript, and CSS.

You should also have a good understanding of valid W3C codes and formats.

You should also know that having optimized images and formatting will speed up the loading of an HTML page.

So, here we go:

If you can make a website design from scratch in Photoshop and turn it into an HTML page, then this is good for you.
There are jobs that require you to take a Photoshop image or PSD and convert it to an HTML page.
That is one.

If you can add content along with good syntax in HTML containers, then you can create good content for a page.
That means you can put data into a blog CMS like Wordpress.
That means you can be given a job to code information into a blog for a website that has e-commerce or simply promotes information.
It can be a virtual assistant of a website for content encoding.
Although you may need to know the language of the person you are going to be VA for. (I tried that with a Chinese and French client and he only knew one damn English) That's
two.

If you can read and validate HTML and CSS, that means you can fix broken HTML and CSS for web pages.
You can correct the wrong placement of HTML, simplify CSS, modify the site to have proper HTML and CSS.
This is a special case when working with CMS because the themes need some changes.
Also, this is also good for working on websites that will be converted to mobile view.
I don't know what to call this job, but I do it all the time as a web developer, although I know how to use PHP, javascript, jQuery, MySQL, among other things.
It could be three.

Now if you can learn to code in the programming languages ​​of the world wide web. Here is a list: Web programming
Choose a group that works together like: PHP, MySQL, javascript, jQuery.
You can also try Ruby on Rails.
You can also try Perl or Python.
Learn how to do SEO (it is not a programming language, it just helps a lot to promote your website).
Go from there.
Become a web programmer.
Become a web developer.
It is up to you where you want to go.

Most of today's web jobs are related to CMS editing and content, as well as many API and SEO connections.
I myself work with Wordpress and Magento all the time (well, right now).
I also worked on Drupal, Magento Go (this bastard died hard), Volusion, Joomla, Concrete 5, Moodle, and much more.
And that's only 5 years from now.

Well, I pointed out where you can go and move.

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