Can I get a job in radiology if I am a criminal?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Sienna Sampson



Can I get a job in radiology if I am a criminal?

Anyone with ANY convictions, other than non-drug traffic offenses, must submit a "pre-application" to AART. AART will then conduct an investigation and determine whether or not it can be certified. If they decide that you can be certified, you don't need to go through the selection process again when you graduate from their program.

That's a pretty broad brush to paint, saying that all Christians are against such things. I think it really depends on the individual.

There is nothing in the Bible that says you cannot forgive. In fact, the last time I read the book cover to cover, it certainly seemed like the New Testament (the part that Christians stick the most to) was quite full of 'forgive the sinner' stories.

Sure, there are some who strongly believe in retributive forms of punishment (which is silly), but in general, the Christians I have met tend to be more in favor of prison reform than the general population that I have met who was not. Christian. The same goes f

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That's a pretty broad brush to paint, saying that all Christians are against such things. I think it really depends on the individual.

There is nothing in the Bible that says you cannot forgive. In fact, the last time I read the book cover to cover, it certainly seemed like the New Testament (the part that Christians stick the most to) was quite full of 'forgive the sinner' stories.

Sure, there are some who strongly believe in retributive forms of punishment (which is silly), but in general, the Christians I have met tend to be more in favor of prison reform than the general population that I have met who were not. Christian. The same is true of the death penalty, which is slowly unraveling these days due to restrictions from pharmaceutical groups.

Also, to be a technician, Jesus wasn't convicted of shit. Conviction requires due process. The crowd basically said that they (really the elites, the Pharisees) felt offended by their laws on the part of Jesus, and Pontius Pilate, not wanting to deal with a mob that probably included not only the Pharisees, but also the fanatics, gave them what they wanted. To him, Jesus was nothing, and if he could sacrifice a Jew to a multitude of Jews to make them quiet, he agreed. He even said that he did not know of any crime that Jesus had committed, and he let the mafia government verify who would go free, Jesus or Barabbas. They shouted for Barabbas to be handed over to the mob, and Pontius Pilate did as they demanded, saying that he had washed his hands of the whole thing.

The story of Jesus on the cross with the two criminals is a great story of redemption for sinners. The two thieves, Dismas and Gestas (note that my spelling in many of these names may be wrong), spoke to Jesus while on the cross; Dismas repented and, according to the Gospel of Luke, asked Jesus to remember him when he got to heaven, while Gestas, who never repented, asked Jesus if he was who they said he was, why he couldn't save himself . This is also where evidence comes from the idea that repenting of your sins, honest repentance, and faith in the Lord was all that was really required to go to heaven in many Christian sects.

I don't know anything about you as a person except what you've written, so forgive me if my advice is wrong or somehow off-base.

First of all, stop looking at what you don't have (a job, money, a place to live) and look at what you do have. From what I can tell from his note, he has a healthy body and mind, a pleasant enough personality that various people have chosen to befriend him, and no responsibility to take care of children, elderly parents, etc. You also appear to have legal working status where you live and a great deal of time, flexibility to rebuild your life.

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I don't know anything about you as a person except what you've written, so forgive me if my advice is wrong or somehow off-base.

First of all, stop looking at what you don't have (a job, money, a place to live) and look at what you do have. From what I can tell from his note, he has a healthy body and mind, a pleasant enough personality that various people have chosen to befriend him, and no responsibility to take care of children, elderly parents, etc. He also appears to have legal work status where he lives and a lot of time flexibility to rebuild his life. Sorry to tell you, but you have a lot more going for you than many other people.

Since you have access to a computer, Google 'services for ex-cons' and 'companies that hire ex-cons' in your area. (Maybe surf in 'incognito' mode if you don't want your roommates to know, or use a computer in the library.) Some local organization is ready to help you. And find out what kind of organization can use your skills. Do you have a strong body, a big customer service smile, a knack for math, a way of dealing with animals?

Tell your new friends that you have decided to work for a while before going back to school. Ask them what they like and respect about you, and then find out how you can take advantage of that in the job market. Someone will give you a chance, but you will be in a better position to find that person once you know what you do well. (You can also Google 'Career Aptitude Test' for some tips.)

And because you want people to help you, start by helping someone else. Find a local organization that needs men (I assume you are a man) to help teens, the homeless, flood control, whatever. (Google "volunteer" in your local area, or ask your place of worship if they have one.) The more good karma you put in, the more it will come back to you.

Finally, there is no point in telling everyone the story about how you were innocent of your crime. It may have been, as I said at the beginning, I don't know anything about you or your case. But almost all criminals claim they are innocent, and saying so makes it difficult to trust you. Saying "I was 19 and I made a very silly mistake" is more reliable and something that almost everyone can relate to; many, many people have made similar mistakes and have been lucky enough not to get caught.

There is a place for you and you CAN succeed. It will take time and perseverance, but it CAN be done. Good luck!

a2a

Let me start with a story

I once hired a man to be my Director of Technical Support at a high-tech company and then he went to work for a competitor as Vice President of Marketing. We had become close friends and at one point he told me that he had been in prison for seventeen years for a variety of crimes, mostly auto theft. It didn't stop him once he set out to do something else. He was a very smart guy and he left it behind. He had a new beginning.

But he was unable to obtain a visa to go to Brazil, or Australia, the requirements are very strict, he said. Most nations allowed him to enter

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a2a

Let me start with a story

I once hired a man to be my Director of Technical Support at a high-tech company and then he went to work for a competitor as Vice President of Marketing. We had become close friends and at one point he told me that he had been in prison for seventeen years for a variety of crimes, mostly auto theft. It didn't stop him once he set out to do something else. He was a very smart guy and he left it behind. He had a new beginning.

But he was unable to obtain a visa to go to Brazil, or Australia, the requirements are very strict, he said. Most nations allowed him in to do business as long as he was honest about his track record, which of course was decades old ...

So, some of the bad news:

If you want to possess a firearm, you will need a pardon or have your record expunged and the conviction reversed.

Voting is complicated because it varies by state, sometimes your rights are restored automatically after a certain time or there is a process to restore them. Some states would need a royal pardon.

You can lie on a job application about felony convictions, which is not a crime just for ordinary jobs; they will most likely fire you if they find out. But leaving the space blank could be said to be fine and you can leave it blank and tell them during the interview process where you have the opportunity to explain ... I would lie for many jobs if I were in that situation, if it is not really relevant to the job , since the chances of being caught are very small.

You won't be able to get a security clearance or pass a strict background check. (Actually, you may get a security clearance if you admit the conviction, it is very old and depending on what it is. That is in part a decision of the clearance agency. It is unlikely and especially for a high clearance clearance. secret. Do not lie in the application, that is a crime.)

You may be able to enlist in the military, but it will require an exemption and is unlikely. If you're otherwise a highly desired candidate (high test scores, special skills, physical qualification), you might qualify, but again, it will depend on what the sentence is for and how desperate the military is for the people.

State law may restrict your ability to obtain a license or registration for some occupations.

In general, it's possible to start over, leave ten years behind, it won't happen often, and yes, a felony IS a life-long limiting factor for most people.

It may depend on the type of job you are looking for. Are you applying to be a driver for an armored courier, like Brinks? That could be a problem.

The reality is that most employers don't check your criminal records, but of course it depends on the type of work you are doing.

If that conviction was a long time ago, and if it is discovered, you could explain it as a “youthful indiscretion” and how much you have learned from your mistakes. If the conviction is more recent, that is more concerning.

I used to work as a human resources manager. Because our employees were handli

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It may depend on the type of job you are looking for. Are you applying to be a driver for an armored courier, like Brinks? That could be a problem.

The reality is that most employers don't check your criminal records, but of course it depends on the type of work you are doing.

If that conviction was a long time ago, and if it is discovered, you could explain it as a “youthful indiscretion” and how much you have learned from your mistakes. If the conviction is more recent, that is more concerning.

I used to work as a human resources manager. Because our employees handled client property and sometimes financial documents that had a face value of perhaps a million dollars or more, we conducted criminal background checks.

All job applicants we hired were required to sign an authorization that would allow us to obtain their criminal records from the Minnesota BCA (Bureau of Criminal Detention).

Here is the problem. The BCA only had records of crimes committed in Minnesota. If that job applicant came from another state, we would not have their criminal record.

Also, I found out that the BCA has no record of any federal crime. (We had an employee who was arrested selling drugs and ended up in federal prison, because that was a federal crime. After he got out of jail, we rehired him because we knew him well. And when we routinely run his criminal record, check his back, he came back CLEAR, even though he had just gotten out of jail).

Some employers are willing to give you a second chance. So if you have the right attitude and are a hard worker, and if they are desperate for good help, they might hire you.

So I guess you could consider moving out of state for a while.

My brother has a felony conviction and got a job as a nurse (RN) in a hospital. He did not tell them about that felony and lied on the job application form. But then a couple of months later, they called him at the office. When they checked his FINGERPRINTS, they discovered that the FBI already had those fingerprints on file. Arrested! He explained the situation and they kept him employed.

I must say my brother HAD a felony conviction. He was pardoned a few years later.

I have been out of prison for 12 years. He did it all without violating probation or committing a new crime.

After serving 16 years for armed robbery, I worked for 5 months as a furniture manufacturer from January 11, 2007 to May 15, 2007.

After being laid off due to slow requests for custom furniture, I looked for another job while doing personal shopping. 5 months later, not finding the job I was looking for, I entered a chain of pancake houses and applied for a job. This was my first year.

The manager asked, "What are you looking for? Can you cook or wait tables?"

While in prison I had learned 3

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I have been out of prison for 12 years. He did it all without violating probation or committing a new crime.

After serving 16 years for armed robbery, I worked for 5 months as a furniture manufacturer from January 11, 2007 to May 15, 2007.

After being laid off due to slow requests for custom furniture, I looked for another job while doing personal shopping. 5 months later, not finding the job I was looking for, I entered a chain of pancake houses and applied for a job. This was my first year.

The manager asked, "What are you looking for? Can you cook or wait tables?"

While in prison, I learned 3 different computer languages ​​and was a tutor in computers, life skills, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and jewelry making. My title was "Program Services Assistant." One of my duties as part of this job was database design and data entry, and I was very good at it.

I looked at the manager and said, "I know how to wash dishes and I need a job, I worked in the prison kitchens and you won't regret it." The manager looked at me, looked at my resume worth $ 50,000 salary. "43 is a bit older for a dishwasher, let me see if I can get you to pay more." He went and talked to the regional manager, came back and said, "how does 11 bucks sound?"

I worked at that restaurant part time for 400 a month, taking the bus when I can. Because the other dishwashers were teenagers, they couldn't work after 9:30 p.m. M. And they had to be at school the morning I filled up, which made me earn more money. While not working, he would take the bus for job interviews. After 5 months my phone rang.

"How would you like to work for the Alaska Food Bank?" "I would love to work there, giving back is what I do."

I walked into the interview and they asked me, "What does the program services assistant do?" I went ahead and explained the database I had created that tracked every order of inmates, the materials they have in their craft supplies, every education class they took. , their race, waiting lists that automatically shuffled the next inmate on a list into their chosen hobby. The database also kept track of inmate orders, cost, and totals for every penny they spent.

When I finished, they looked at each other with a twinkle in their eyes and explained that they were looking for a data manager and decided that the new title should be "Program Services Assistant."

I worked there from March 2008 to April 2015. I stayed at 12.50 and the board of directors gave me a raise, 4.60 was all they came up with. The directors insisted on finding money to pay me more. After a year I was given the title of Inventory Specialist, it was a new title for the organization. I was asked to clean up the inventory that consisted of 6 million pounds of food a year and provided supplemental food to 190,000 Alaskans. After 3 months I was asked to take over customer service at the warehouse. When I left, I was the facilities and equipment supervisor. As a customer service representative, I increased cash flow by 50,000 for the first 6 months. I personally handled and touched 6 different federal food programs. As a facilities supervisor I saved the organization over 14,000 a month by reducing unnecessary contracts and optimizing delivery operations. Before I left, I provided valuable information on deliveries and the weight delivered by each truck by collecting 3-year data and analyzing each impression. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks.

There were tears the day I left, not because of what I had done, but because of what I had become.

The last 3 years they found me at home in my village, working as an EMS coordinator. He had organized a team of volunteer firefighters to build a professional fire department. I was trained among the best firefighters and I am one of 22 specially trained firefighters on board ships in the state of Alaska. I have provided life-saving measures, including the suppression of an armed suicide bomber while I was unarmed. I have assisted and coordinated medical, search and rescue, saved homes from fires.

I became a man who will do whatever it takes to help others.

Use any previous or prison work you've done on your resume. Get a job, whatever the job, and use it as a stepping stone. If you are willing to wash dishes, scrub floors, your next potential employer will see that you are someone who is willing to do whatever it takes to get to the top. Any organization wants someone who is willing to work hard to grow with them. My resume was fit for 50,000 a year minimum. I wasn't about to simplify it, because I had faith that someone would see my true worth. I can't tell you how many times my heart sank when I heard "I'm sorry, you're not the right person." In Alaska, walk in 3 feet of snow, with a quarter mile between bus stops, 0 degrees with the wind.

The best way to get a job? Keep plowing, don't give up.

A few years ago, I was having lunch at the counter of a Denny's restaurant in South Tucson when I overheard a fascinating conversation. While manning the cash register and serving customers at the counter during the lunch rush hour, the Denny's manager was talking to a young man. The young man was disheveled in appearance and looked like a hung dog.

Paraphrasing the manager:

“Fifteen years ago, I was exactly where you are now, and in the same situation. He had just gotten out of jail and was asking the manager about a table cleaning job. Fifteen years later, I am the manager of this restaurant.

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A few years ago, I was having lunch at the counter of a Denny's restaurant in South Tucson when I overheard a fascinating conversation. While manning the cash register and serving customers at the counter during the lunch rush hour, the Denny's manager was talking to a young man. The young man was disheveled in appearance and looked like a hung dog.

Paraphrasing the manager:

“Fifteen years ago, I was exactly where you are now, and in the same situation. He had just gotten out of jail and was asking the manager about a table cleaning job. Fifteen years later, I am the manager of this restaurant. Fifteen years ago, the manager told me what I am going to tell you now. I know people can make horrible mistakes, but those mistakes don't have to determine the rest of your life, as long as you are willing to learn from your mistakes and someone is willing to give you a chance. I am willing to give you that opportunity because someone gave me that opportunity years ago.

I am going to hold you to a higher standard than other employees because the stakes for both are higher. I hope you meet all the requirements of your parole. I will be in regular contact with your parole officer to report on your progress. I hope you are absolutely honest with me at all times. I hope you are here before your shift begins, in uniform and properly groomed. I hope you do your job and treat our customers and employees with respect.

I cannot guarantee that you will be running your own restaurant in fifteen years; but I can guarantee that my employees and I will treat you fairly and respectfully. If you show me that you are a responsible employee and have more responsibilities, I will give you more responsibilities and raise your salary. When you are ready to leave the transitional home, I will work with your parole officer to help you find a place to live. Those are my terms. Do you want that opportunity?

The young man fought back tears and was finally able to say, “Thank you. When can I start?

I suspect the young man's parole officer had sent him to this Denny's because he knew the manager well and had worked with him in the past to secure employment for his parolees.

My advice is to go ahead and apply for jobs. Wait for them to say "no"; don't assume someone will turn you down on an offer.

There are many people with a long criminal record or who have a friend or family member with one.

If you think this crime will come up, go ahead and volunteer the information. This way, the recruiter (or whoever) will know your side of the story and will not assume the worst. This has actually worked surprisingly well for me and has actually earned me some respect from potential bosses / employers.

You can also try to get a trade. Many ex-convicts and criminals do this. Some trades p

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My advice is to go ahead and apply for jobs. Wait for them to say "no"; don't assume someone will turn you down on an offer.

There are many people with a long criminal record or who have a friend or family member with one.

If you think this crime will come up, go ahead and volunteer the information. This way, the recruiter (or whoever) will know your side of the story and will not assume the worst. This has actually worked surprisingly well for me and has actually earned me some respect from potential bosses / employers.

You can also try to get a trade. Many ex-convicts and criminals do this. Some operations pay A LOT. Electric utility linemen can make six figures (in Texas) after a few years. Some of them become foremen and earn close to $ 200k. Keep in mind that they earn this salary where the median price of a home is like $ 150k.

Another consideration is going to college and getting some degrees. That is the path I took and I have no regrets. I have student loans, but I earn more than double the "average" salary in my city. This also allowed about 5 years to pass from my release date.

Despite what you think, having a felony conviction does not prevent you from obtaining grants and scholarships. The only thing I remember is being asked if I was convicted of a drug charge during a grant time (that was not my case). Even if that's your problem, you can still qualify for grants by attending a few classes or something like that. I forgot the stipulations, but they weren't crazy. The college application didn't even ask about a criminal record. I even went to graduate school after getting my bachelor's degree.

The best thing to do is to go a long period of time without getting into any more trouble. Go ahead and apply. There are so many places that I have applied online, and because of this, I got a lot of interviews. I have traveled all over the country (free) for the last year looking to start my career.

I finally found a place and a job that I am happy with.

I don't know much about legality, but I do know a bit about probability.

A friend was working with a woman in her forties who was receiving basic nursing education (I'm sure it was a two-year program). He wanted to work at the local university hospital and had even trained there.

Oh by the way, she was addicted to drugs. Sniffing pills constantly. And this was not new; the courts had taken her children because of their drug abuse and how far she was willing to go to get more. He did not have custody of any of his children, which is rare. He had repeated convictions for possession,

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I don't know much about legality, but I do know a bit about probability.

A friend was working with a woman in her forties who was receiving basic nursing education (I'm sure it was a two-year program). He wanted to work at the local university hospital and had even trained there.

Oh by the way, she was addicted to drugs. Sniffing pills constantly. And this was not new; the courts had taken her children because of their drug abuse and how far she was willing to go to get more. He did not have custody of any of his children, which is rare. He had repeated convictions for possession, trafficking and various crimes related to drug possession. There are addicts out there who change things, but this woman was just a piece of shit who stole from EVERYONE around her to feed her habit and would have sold her kids for more.

Regardless, this woman graduates from the program and quits her job, leaving a nasty written message to the owner. However, she forgot to make sure she had a job before burning bridges with the few people who were stupid enough to employ her, and in doing so, she found herself without a nursing job of any kind (even local communities of seniors became laughed at his request). She ended up working at a quik-e-mart, where she would be arrested for stealing YET AGAIN to fuel her drug addiction.

If we talk about real nurses, in hospitals, you have to understand something. There is a LOT of legal risk in a hospital and they already have enough problems. If it looks like your felony will compound your problems in the hospital, you probably won't get the job. Something like one in three nurses abuses painkillers, and hospitals don't need more people like that.

No one should get jobs more easily than other people for any reason other than experience and skill. And especially not for a reason like that.

And I think that we (in the US From A) should reform and rehabilitate criminals. Logically, it is a more practical plan than storing and brutalizing them.

And I am against discrimination ... for characteristics that are not your fault. Criminals usually did something to go to jail, usually of their own free will. If not, they should take a break.

But if so, then they hook up behind people who didn't rape, murder, or steal someone's prized possessions in order to exchange them.

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No one should get jobs more easily than other people for any reason other than experience and skill. And especially not for a reason like that.

And I think that we (in the US From A) should reform and rehabilitate criminals. Logically, it is a more practical plan than storing and brutalizing them.

And I am against discrimination ... for characteristics that are not your fault. Criminals usually did something to go to jail, usually of their own free will. If not, they should take a break.

But if so, they go in line after people who didn't rape, murder, or steal someone's most prized possessions to trade them for methamphetamine. Sorry.

It's almost impossible. The ex-offender must be honest in a job application related to the gap in employment history and accept the job from the first person offered. The state or federal civil administrator is a good option, if it is not a security clearance. These agencies cannot discriminate. Basically, they assume that their "debt to society" has been paid. I worked driving a big truck for Knight Transportation and they hired ex-criminals. Most of the big heavy truck companies will start them up. It's hard and honorable work, you'll stay busy, keep your bills paid, and build a future.

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