Can I get a full-time job in Germany without knowing the German language? With the master's degree in my own country, can I get a job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Christopher Duncan



Can I get a full-time job in Germany without knowing the German language? With the master's degree in my own country, can I get a job?

You don't mention what MS you have. That is essential.
Some branches would accept you for a very specific purpose.

If you don't know the German language, you must have some skills that are rare in Germany. And they are requested.

The first problem is:
- As long as you do not have any contact with customers. you can be sure.
- As soon as you have contact with customers, the negatives will begin.
Are the customers racist? No, but they prefer to do business in their own language. That happens everywhere.

The second problem is:
- You are expected to learn the language during the first or two

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You don't mention what MS you have. That is essential.
Some branches would accept you for a very specific purpose.

If you don't know the German language, you must have some skills that are rare in Germany. And they are requested.

The first problem is:
- As long as you do not have any contact with customers. you can be sure.
- As soon as you have contact with customers, the negatives will begin.
Are the customers racist? No, but they prefer to do business in their own language. That happens everywhere.

The second problem is:
- You are expected to learn the language in the first one or two years.
- If you don't master it, your career stops wherever you are. You made it to the glass ceiling.

So: Wherever you go, make sure you master the local language. Preferably before landing there.

I have written similar answers to similar questions: I came to Germany 20 years ago, not knowing the language, but I had an engineering degree and a company was willing to hire me, speaking English in the company was fine, but… ..

You will have a life outside of work, your family will have a life and you will not be able to live your life in a dignified way in Germany without a decent level of the German language: Do you need to see a doctor, a dentist? Do you need to rent a place to live? Do you need to take your children to kindergarten or school? Do you need to deal with authorities of any kind? You can fo

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I have written similar answers to similar questions: I came to Germany 20 years ago, not knowing the language, but I had an engineering degree and a company was willing to hire me, speaking English in the company was fine, but… ..

You will have a life outside of work, your family will have a life and you will not be able to live your life in a dignified way in Germany without a decent level of the German language: Do you need to see a doctor, a dentist? Do you need to rent a place to live? Do you need to take your children to kindergarten or school? Do you need to deal with authorities of any kind? You can forget a lot about that, if your German is poor.

Dear, unfortunately my answer is NO, as I think there is great discrimination for those who do not know the local / German language. So if you really want to find / get work, my / many of us have a suggestion to learn a language at least B2 (almost all sectors except IT) and then you can easily find work.

I would not try to get a job in any country without having at least a basic knowledge of the language.

Technically YES, but as usual it really depends.

  • What kind of job are you looking for? What skills do you have to offer? If you're looking for a menial job or one that doesn't require any academic knowledge, then you probably just need to know a little of the language to get started. For example, if you are going to work at a bakery counter, you will need to speak some German in order to handle orders. If you are looking for a job in a certain field of study, then the answer is, once again, it depends.
  • Did you finish your studies in your home country and are you looking for a job in Ge
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Technically YES, but as usual it really depends.

  • What kind of job are you looking for? What skills do you have to offer? If you're looking for a menial job or one that doesn't require any academic knowledge, then you probably just need to know a little of the language to get started. For example, if you are going to work at a bakery counter, you will need to speak some German in order to handle orders. If you are looking for a job in a certain field of study, then the answer is, once again, it depends.
  • Did you finish your studies in your home country and are you looking for a job in Germany? I would say that it is very difficult to achieve this without prior experience in your field. Ratings can only take you so far. It is not impossible (as few things generally are), and I have met people who have succeeded, but they are the exception rather than the rule. Simply applying for a job seeker visa in Germany will require you to have a minimum of 5 years of work experience in your chosen field. Finally, you would probably look for this job from your home country. It is highly unlikely that they will call you in for an interview if they cannot meet with you in person. Unless you are academically extraordinary, I doubt they will call you.
  • Are you planning or have you already studied in Germany (Bachelor or Master or both)? Being educated in a family institution for German companies is of great help in securing that first job in Germany. Many courses today also require you to have work experience before starting your studies, but there are also many that do not. Getting the first or even the second or third job will not be easy, but there are many opportunities available and for almost all graduates, it eventually works out. In my opinion, if you are highly educated and looking to live and work in Germany, obtaining a master's degree from a German university will be of great help and the 18-month work search visa after completing your studies means you have time to Do it at your own pace.

For more information on the subject, check out this video:

DO YOU NEED work experience before MS in Germany?

Good luck!

This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job openings that c

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This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job postings I clicked on asked for a specific thing at the bottom:

"Fließend in Deutsch und English", ie "Fluent in German and English"

Clearly I was missing the German part of it.

Just to make things even more difficult, he was specifically applying for jobs that he didn't have the skills for. Intelligent.

Why do you ask? I hated my major in college and wasn't about to settle for it.

So let's see, I am not fluent in the language nor am I willing to use the skills that I spent 3 years developing. There is absolutely no way for me to get a job, right?

Fast forward 1 year, I work at Entrepreneur First, the world's largest talent investor, where I help super smart people build companies in Berlin.

Being in Germany without speaking the language, you have two options:

  1. Or be a loser and nobody in a German company
  2. Be a high-level player in the emerging startup scene in Germany

70% of the labor market understands the former and that is also why you probably asked this question.

But the last 30% is all yours to take advantage of and in my opinion that's also where innovation and exciting things are brewing and all you need to get a job is a valuable skill set (chances are, you have more tan than you had when you were applying).

If I, as an individual who received the worst possible card, that is, a foreigner who is not fluent in German and has studied a highly research-oriented degree, can make it on the German job market, then anyone can.

Fun fact: I am now B2 in German and all the other foreigners in my company come to me with questions when they don't understand or need help in German, how strange.

Remember, this only happens if you play your cards right;)

Germany has always been a prime destination for those who want to work abroad.

The good news is that Germany has many job opportunities and is also facing a skills shortage, according to recent reports. By 2030, Germany is expected to have a skills shortage of at least 3 million workers. This trend is expected to continue in 2021 and beyond.

Job opportunities in Germany in 2021 and beyond will be a combination of newly created jobs and the need to replace those who leave due to retirement or move to other jobs. In fact, one of the main reasons for the skills shortage in Germany is the aging population.

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Germany has always been a prime destination for those who want to work abroad.

The good news is that Germany has many job opportunities and is also facing a skills shortage, according to recent reports. By 2030, Germany is expected to have a skills shortage of at least 3 million workers. This trend is expected to continue in 2021 and beyond.

Job opportunities in Germany in 2021 and beyond will be a combination of newly created jobs and the need to replace those who leave due to retirement or move to other jobs. In fact, one of the main reasons for the skills shortage in Germany is the aging population.

  • Medical professionals
  • Engineering professionals
  • Career opportunities in math, information technology, science, and technology
  • There will also be job opportunities that do not require specialized qualifications such as nursing, industrial mechanics, and retail sales.

I went through the other answers and agree with most of them.

Yes, you can do a part-time job with basic German-speaking skills and earn enough to survive. At A1 level of German, I worked as a street cleaner to remove snow in winter, packed frozen food for 8 hours a day, and took night shifts in a clothing warehouse taking inventory.

But if you want to have an edge over your competitors and get a part-time job of your choice, that could also help you advance your career, as well as giving you more pay than a basic job that requires no skills, you need to speak German well.

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I went through the other answers and agree with most of them.

Yes, you can do a part-time job with basic German-speaking skills and earn enough to survive. At A1 level of German, I worked as a street cleaner to remove snow in winter, packed frozen food for 8 hours a day, and took night shifts in a clothing warehouse taking inventory.

But if you want to have an edge over your competitors and land a part-time job of your choice, that could also help you advance your career, as well as giving you more pay than a basic job that requires no skills, speaking good German is necessary. Once I improved my German (and had good luck, that is, an amazing girlfriend) I was able to work in a company close to my vocational field and then based on that work I got an internship and that in turn earned me a job from student in college who paid almost double the basic jobs.

I also implore master's students who have recently moved to Germany to take a semester or two to settle down, integrate into their study programs, build a network, and learn German before rushing out to find part-time work and losing money. view why you moved to Germany in the first place. You are here to study and build a career. It is a big step to move from your home country to Germany. Savor the experience of living and studying in a new country with a new culture and learning the local language. Once all of this is settled, you will definitely find a good part-time job to keep yourself financially afloat. Good luck!

Hello there

you want to pursue a master of science degree in germany so cool, just go for it, follow your passion. and reach your goals.

Now we come to your second question about the possibilities of getting a job in Germany.

If I tell you that there is a 100% chance of getting a job, will you completely believe in me or should I tell you that there is no chance that you will try elsewhere or be disappointed? listen I'm not trying to put you off, I'm just telling you that opportunities don't always work out in life, life will change in which corner we just don't know, let's assume you have completed your masters degree in germany and get a good

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Hello there

you want to pursue a master of science degree in germany so cool, just go for it, follow your passion. and reach your goals.

Now we come to your second question about the possibilities of getting a job in Germany.

If I tell you that there is a 100% chance of getting a job, will you completely believe in me or should I tell you that there is no chance that you will try elsewhere or be disappointed? listen I'm not trying to put you off, I'm just telling you that opportunities don't always work out in life, life will change in which corner we just don't know, suppose you have completed your masters degree in germany and get a good job in america or do your Master's degree in your hometown and you get a good job in Germany, nobody knows what will happen next, we just do the best we can to reach our goals.

Look, there are always 50 to 50 chances of getting what we want. 50% is our hard work, knowledge, self-esteem, concentration, confidence. and 50% is our luck, but if we totally give our 100% on our first 50%, the rest of the 50%, which is luck, will be forced to follow it.

So don't worry so much about work only in Germany or any country you want, study hard, get knowledge, develop your skills and look for a job and one thing I surely know is that you will get your dream job.

All the best

If one of the job requirements is German skills, writing your CV (and motivation letter) in German is one way to demonstrate those skills. If your knowledge of German is not advanced enough to do it without many mistakes, find someone who can review it. If the ad is only in German, it can tell you something about the target group of the ad. This does not mean that they will put your application directly in the trash. But he tells you that in that company, German is used for everything that is important. If you are applying for a job that requires you to talk a lot with your co-workers (b

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If one of the job requirements is German skills, writing your CV (and motivation letter) in German is one way to demonstrate those skills. If your knowledge of German is not advanced enough to do it without many mistakes, find someone who can review it. If the ad is only in German, it can tell you something about the target group of the ad. This does not mean that they will put your application directly in the trash. But he tells you that in that company, German is used for everything that is important. If you are applying for a job that requires you to talk a lot with your co-workers (basically all jobs that pay a living wage), you are at a serious disadvantage compared to anyone with similar qualifications as you and who is fluent in German. .

If the job advertisement is published in both English and German (or even only in English), it shows that they are also aimed at people who may not speak German well. So submitting your documents in English is fine.

Since you are only asking for a CV - be sure to research how to write a proper job application in Germany. Following the formalities can be of great help in moving to the next stage, especially if you are new to the country.

Writing this answer based purely on my own experiences. In short, finding a job in Germany is difficult and not knowing German makes it more difficult. But it is not impossible, given that the candidate has the right skills and the right attitude towards the job. I had a colleague at university, with mostly average grades, no practical experience of any kind, B1 in German and a good conceptual knowledge of the subject. He found a job within a month of looking for it. The interview he gave was entirely in English, and now just half a year later he is speaking in German. The second person made his teacher, then d

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Writing this answer based purely on my own experiences. In short, finding a job in Germany is difficult and not knowing German makes it more difficult. But it is not impossible, given that the candidate has the right skills and the right attitude towards the job. I had a colleague at university, with mostly average grades, no practical experience of any kind, B1 in German and a good conceptual knowledge of the subject. He found a job within a month of looking for it. The interview he gave was entirely in English, and now just half a year later he is speaking in German. The second person did his master's degree, then did an internship for 6 months and a thesis for 6 months from a renowned international firm. His scores were also average and he had B1 in German (but due to 1 year of work in an English company he almost forgot). After applying to a couple of firms, he received multiple offers from many large firms for full-time positions. Therefore, by having the right attitude and skills, it is possible to find a job in Germany :) once you find a job, you can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :) You can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :) You can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :)

Yes, that is all possible. Not guaranteed, yes, but it is possible.

However, be careful with the type of certificate. Most universities require a TELC C1 exam (there is a specific one for students) or a Goethe C1 certificate or they manage to pass TestDaF (also Goethe's) at a level that is around mid-C1. Other types of certificates are examined or discarded entirely.

You should also work to improve even more during your studies or course. Writing final exams and a thesis in German is a C2 level task that many Germans would not be able to do. Expect things to come a little less easy

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Yes, that is all possible. Not guaranteed, yes, but it is possible.

However, be careful with the type of certificate. Most universities require a TELC C1 exam (there is a specific one for students) or a Goethe C1 certificate or they manage to pass TestDaF (also Goethe's) at a level that is around mid-C1. Other types of certificates are examined or discarded entirely.

You should also work to improve even more during your studies or course. Writing final exams and a thesis in German is a C2 level task that many Germans would not be able to do. Expect things to happen a little less easily than for the Germans around you. This doesn't have to make having a job problematic, but you should try to find one that can help you expand your horizons, for example a job at university.

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