Can I find a job in Germany that does not require a very high level of the German language?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jacob Brown



Can I find a job in Germany that does not require a very high level of the German language?

Of course it's possible. You can always work for an international company if your English is at a high level. Another option would be to become a teacher at an international school. But you need a Qualifikation for any of these jobs. So if you don't have any of these, you could work in jobs that don't require these kinds of things. How to be a gardener or cleaner

Yes, you can, it is not impossible, but if you want to work in Germany, at least you need to know A1, A2, B1 and B2. which will take a maximum of 7 months to complete. this is enough to get a job in Germany and also to get a visa. If you learn German, you will not face any challenges during your work in Germany. you can deal with everyone because the smallest percentage of Germans speak English.

Greetings

This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job openings that c

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This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job postings I clicked on asked for a specific thing at the bottom:

"Fließend in Deutsch und English", ie "Fluent in German and English"

Clearly I was missing the German part of it.

Just to make things even more difficult, he was specifically applying for jobs that he didn't have the skills for. Intelligent.

Why do you ask? I hated my major in college and wasn't about to settle for it.

So let's see, I am not fluent in the language nor am I willing to use the skills that I spent 3 years developing. There is absolutely no way for me to get a job, right?

Fast forward 1 year, I work at Entrepreneur First, the world's largest talent investor, where I help super smart people build companies in Berlin.

Being in Germany without speaking the language, you have two options:

  1. Or be a loser and nobody in a German company
  2. Be a high-level player in the emerging startup scene in Germany

70% of the labor market understands the former and that is also why you probably asked this question.

But the last 30% is all yours to take advantage of and in my opinion that's also where innovation and exciting things are brewing and all you need to get a job is a valuable skill set (chances are, you have more tan than you had when you were applying).

If I, as an individual who received the worst possible card, that is, a foreigner who is not fluent in German and has studied a highly research-oriented degree, can make it on the German job market, then anyone can.

Fun fact: I am now B2 in German and all the other foreigners in my company come to me with questions when they don't understand or need help in German, how strange.

Remember, this only happens if you play your cards right;)

Thanks to Joachim Pense for the A2A.

There is no single definition of requirements for knowledge of the German language. It is completely up to the employer and your job requirements.

The vast majority of employers will want someone who is at least capable of carrying on a conversation in German, but with a definite preference for someone who is verhandlungssicher (a term that goes beyond mere fluency and means that they can understand legal terms, etc.). This is particularly true for sales or management positions.

However, in jobs where English is widely used (such as IT) and / or where contact with clients is

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Thanks to Joachim Pense for the A2A.

There is no single definition of requirements for knowledge of the German language. It is completely up to the employer and your job requirements.

The vast majority of employers will want someone who is at least capable of carrying on a conversation in German, but with a definite preference for someone who is verhandlungssicher (a term that goes beyond mere fluency and means that they can understand legal terms, etc.). This is particularly true for sales or management positions.

However, in jobs where English is widely used (such as IT) and / or where contact with clients is minimal or non-existent, they can be much more relaxed. If you have special skills that are in demand, you can get away with much less than someone who is less qualified.

The Council of Europe has defined levels of language proficiency, 1 and if you have a certification under those definitions, you should definitely mention it on your resume. The basic level is called A1 or A2; intermediate is B1 or B2 (the latter is considered "fluid"); and advanced is called C1 or C2 (the latter is equivalent to verhandlungssicher). The final level is Muttersprachler (native speaker).

As a general rule, each of the six levels will require an average of at least one or two courses / semesters to reach that level; Deutsche Welle estimates, for example, that reaching level B2 from scratch will take about 400 class hours in total. To get certified, you will need to take a standardized test.

A job description will generally include language requirements based on the above system. If not, ask.

Footnotes

1 Common European Framework of Reference for Languages ​​- Wikipedia

I have been living in Germany for almost 5 years. Berlin in particular, doing software development. Entwickler software for Ich containers. I told that once to the Kontrolleuren who verified passports once, and you never saw the eyes light up as much as Roman candles. They happened to buy me. Partly because I said it in their own language, but they were just blown away überall. Germans respect intelligence. I wish the same would happen with the United States, where I am from!

What others say about Germany in particular is definitely true. In German-run companies, mainly German is spoken, and you would do well to l

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I have been living in Germany for almost 5 years. Berlin in particular, doing software development. Entwickler software for Ich containers. I told that once to the Kontrolleuren who verified passports once, and you never saw the eyes light up as much as Roman candles. They happened to buy me. Partly because I said it in their own language, but they were just blown away überall. Germans respect intelligence. I wish the same would happen with the United States, where I am from!

What others say about Germany in particular is definitely true. In German-run companies, German is mainly spoken, and you would do well to learn it. But that can be a slow process.

In Berlin, it is entirely possible to get by with English alone, and many do, much to the chagrin of the Germans who live here, who wonder why they can't bother learning the language after having been here. during years. Many businesses here are owned by non-Germans, which draws an international crowd, and the default language in that case will be English, hands down.

But if you want to work for some of the most lucrative German firms, you will need to know Deutsch. They may hire you anyway because they are desperate for talent, but you will come across many cases where entire meetings are held in German and they may switch to English just for your benefit, or they can expect you to catch up. . what happened after the fact with his companions. I don't need to explain all the problems with that to you.

Mein Deutsch ist noch schlecht, aber bessern. Germans appreciate that I am making the effort, but living in Berlin, where English is so common, is difficult. In fact, the presence of English has grown since I arrived here, which is very annoying to me. Of course, I would have appreciated that level when I first came here, but now? I strive to deepen my German skills, and I hate when Germans switch to English when they see me struggling. Ich brauche dieser Kampf !!!

But I digress.

Take the time and investment to learn German if you expect to be here for a long time. Just do it. You can start in Berlin or Frankfurt (Berlin is much better!), And then move on to other areas of Germany once you have mastered the language.

It kills me to be able to get a better paying job that I could have easily done, except that they needed full fluency in German. So do yourself a favor and learn sprechen Deutsch.

First of all, here are some general tips and advice on how to find English-speaking jobs in Germany.

It's difficult because any role that may involve extensive interaction with internal stakeholders and potentially customers will require the ability to communicate in the language of the company. Therefore, unless you apply to international companies that have a corporate English policy, it will be difficult. Everyone who doesn't speak German is looking in the same places as you, so instead of applying for positions that may have 4-5 applicants, you are competing against 40-50.

In fact,

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First of all, here are some general tips and advice on how to find English-speaking jobs in Germany.

It's difficult because any role that may involve extensive interaction with internal stakeholders and potentially customers will require the ability to communicate in the language of the company. Therefore, unless you apply to international companies that have a corporate English policy, it will be difficult. Everyone who doesn't speak German is looking in the same places as you, so instead of applying for positions that may have 4-5 applicants, you are competing against 40-50.

In fact, it is the most difficult problem faced by foreign job seekers in Germany. The country is crying out for people trained to fill the job vacancies vacated by a rapidly aging German workforce. It will take many years to integrate all the refugees, if the German government is able to succeed in this task. I personally have my doubts. The fastest way to get a good job in Germany is to master German, along with good job application training.

I interviewed a startup CEO this week for my website. It is a company that specializes in matching open positions with the right candidates. The article will be published in a couple of weeks, for information.

If you had plans to stay in Germany after doing a Master in Supply Chain Management in Germany, I'm honestly a bit surprised why you didn't learn German. To me that is the most obvious as it allows you to target 100% of open positions, rather than maybe the 5-10% that will accept applications in English ... it's a numbers game.

Here are some general tips on how to learn German using the smartphone app or podcast and how to stay motivated.

Good luck and start learning… you are in someone else's country and it is your duty to learn the language.

Fast answer:

It will be difficult, especially if you are not:

a) educated to the minimum bachelor's degree level in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) profession, or;

b) a technical / professional expert with years of work experience in a specific occupation for which Germany has a shortage of workers. Even then, Germans are not guaranteed to recognize your qualifications.

I have developed a short 10 minute quiz that you can download here to help you understand how good your chances are.

Longer answer:

It depends on the type of job you are looking for. It is relati

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Fast answer:

It will be difficult, especially if you are not:

a) educated to the minimum bachelor's degree level in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) profession, or;

b) a technical / professional expert with years of work experience in a specific occupation for which Germany has a shortage of workers. Even then, Germans are not guaranteed to recognize your qualifications.

I have developed a short 10 minute quiz that you can download here to help you understand how good your chances are.

Longer answer:

It depends on the type of job you are looking for. It is relatively easy to find unskilled work, especially bar / restaurant waiters, logistics / warehouse operators. But again, how are you going to get a visa for this type of work? Many EU citizens and asylum seekers already in Germany could do these jobs.

This is not Amsterdam, Dubai or Singapore ...

My best advice to give here would be to approach this pragmatically and assess your current situation based on these factors and tips.

Yes, Germany has the lowest unemployment since reunification. But for every English speaking job, there will be a high demand unless it is an extremely rare and sought after skill. It should also be noted that many young Germans have lived abroad as part of their studies or their first years of professional careers, so the country does not exactly have a shortage of native speakers of English.

You are also more likely to seek "off the beaten track" opportunities for success than to speculatively apply to well-known companies that have an overtly English hiring policy.

Depends on paper and industry

Some industries and types of jobs are, by nature, less dependent on language skills.

You are less likely to need to be fluent in German if you work as a programmer or software engineer than if you work in a customer-facing or customer-facing role such as Sales and Marketing, dealing primarily with German-speaking customers.

It goes without saying that any position that requires more communication and interaction skills with external clients, clients and suppliers will be more difficult to achieve if you do not speak the native language of the country you are in.

It depends on the size of the company

Large multinationals are more likely to adopt English as an international business language. This not only applies to foreign companies, but also to some larger German companies.

Midsize family businesses are much less likely to offer jobs in English, although ironically these are the same businesses that struggle the most with a skills gap for essential vacancies.

It depends on the age of the position

This is possibly the most critical factor.

The general rule of thumb is: the higher the position, the less important it is to master German, especially in foreign-owned multinational companies.

Why is this?

Higher-level positions tend to be performed in a more international environment. If the company is multinational, these positions will interact with their peers in many different countries rather than in a single production plant or local headquarters.

Additionally, roles that are team leader or department head positions and come with direct reporting also reduce the need to be able to 'swim' on your own in a foreign environment, if you have native speakers as team members who can help in any situation where your lack of language skills may be insufficient.

It depends on your experience

Maybe I'm stating the obvious here, but it will be easier for an experienced candidate to land an English-speaking job than for a recent college graduate.

This is a "buyer's market." There are many more candidates than English speaking positions. English-speaking jobs are in high demand because there are many well-educated international job seekers in Germany who are not (yet) fluent in German.

You will see a reasonable number of entry-level positions advertised, especially in industries that require English speakers to deal with the international market or that can operate in an English-speaking environment. The key here, however, is that employers will generally want to see some relevant qualifications and work experience, and thus the market is tough for recent graduates with little practical experience on their CVs.

Get an edge on the competition!

Do your best to look where your competition is not looking.

I'm not saying don't apply AT ALL for any position you see on LinkedIn and co, but certainly don't follow this as your only strategy. Because I can guarantee that everyone else is looking there because they are the most obvious places.

Your network is your net worth

Everyone has a valuable network of contacts, even if they don't realize it. Look beyond your "obvious" contacts. Who else do you know who can help you? Maybe they know someone, who knows someone, who can connect you.

This is what is known as a dormant network - a "dormant" network, which you may not even know exists, but which has the potential to be extremely powerful in your search.

Some examples ... definitely a non-exhaustive list.

  • Your former college professor or tutor
  • Fellow alumni who may have contacts in Germany
  • Friends / family of your partner
  • Any German friends or followers you may have on social media.
  • Your tandem partner in German

Talk to international headhunting companies

Admittedly, this is geared more towards specialized and managerial positions than entry-level positions. However, contacting a well-known headhunting company that also has operations in Germany will give you access to a very valuable network of contacts.

If your skill set and experience appeal to them, THEY will do the hard work for you because there is a hefty commission for them. A classic win-win situation!

The headhunting / executive search industry tends to be quite industry specific, except for a few generalists like Michael Page, who seem to cover most areas. LinkedIn's search feature is your friend here in identifying headhunters in your profession or industry. Take about 30 minutes to type in different keywords in your search, for example, "Pharmacy jobs in Frankfurt". You will soon have an idea of ​​who is in the game and what positions are advertised in English.

My advice:

Increase your knowledge of the German language to at least level B1 before thinking about making the switch. Formulate your specific strategy, have a professional look through your CV, find someone to advise you with job applications, and don't look where others look.

It is not probable. If you already live here with a residence permit that allows you to work, you may find yourself getting a menial job, like stocking shelves or delivering newspapers. And yes, there are some really specialized fields, like IT jobs, where English will suffice. But 95% of the jobs will require a good German.

You actually need to know a level of English for some professional jobs, but generally in addition, rather than being an alternative to German. And many, like being a lawyer or a doctor, are legally required to have a C1 level, others like nurses and physiotherapists will need B1 or B2. And almost all college programs

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It is not probable. If you already live here with a residence permit that allows you to work, you may find yourself getting a menial job, like stocking shelves or delivering newspapers. And yes, there are some really specialized fields, like IT jobs, where English will suffice. But 95% of the jobs will require a good German.

You actually need to know a level of English for some professional jobs, but generally in addition, rather than being an alternative to German. And many, like being a lawyer or a doctor, are legally required to have a C1 level, others like nurses and physiotherapists will need B1 or B2. And almost all university programs taught in German (most of them) will require C1.

Therefore, even other EU / Schengen citizens who do not need a work permit per se will not get a job due to lack of knowledge of the German language.

I often see claims that there are a lot of jobs for English speakers, but statistically it's delusional; limited to a few small niches.

On average, it takes almost a year to get one. This comes with all the rejections and corrections during the time period and the point where luck favors you.

When you apply and the company really needs someone urgently, you fit in. Yes, you definitely face rejections based on the language barrier, but if you're good and the company prefers skills over not-so-good language proficiency, get the job.

The difficulties you face may be:

  1. Low finances after school
  2. Working multiple split times
  3. Time management
  4. Witty thinking
  5. Corrective Measurement Buffer
  6. Improved language skills

All this at once, can be

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On average, it takes almost a year to get one. This comes with all the rejections and corrections during the time period and the point where luck favors you.

When you apply and the company really needs someone urgently, you fit in. Yes, you definitely face rejections based on the language barrier, but if you're good and the company prefers skills over not-so-good language proficiency, get the job.

The difficulties you face may be:

  1. Low finances after school
  2. Working multiple split times
  3. Time management
  4. Witty thinking
  5. Corrective Measurement Buffer
  6. Improved language skills

All of this at once can lead to depression or motivate a person to work harder. Choose your side and decide wisely. IT IS NOT SHAME TO RETURN TO YOUR COUNTRY AND WORK.

Yes. Good language skills always help you get a job. This will be subject to the level and type of skill you possess and the checks and balances of immigration laws. Given that Germany appears to have partially committed suicide with its open border policy in recent years, it may not be too difficult.

I would also go over my English grammar. "Can I get a job in Germany more easily?" It is grammatically incorrect.

"Easier" is the comparative adjective form of "easy" and should not be used in the second sentence of your question.

"More easily" is the comparative adverbial form of "easily", so:

"Can I get a job at Germa?

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Yes. Good language skills always help you get a job. This will be subject to the level and type of skill you possess and the checks and balances of immigration laws. Given that Germany appears to have partially committed suicide with its open border policy in recent years, it may not be too difficult.

I would also go over my English grammar. "Can I get a job in Germany more easily?" It is grammatically incorrect.

"Easier" is the comparative adjective form of "easy" and should not be used in the second sentence of your question.

"More easily" is the comparative adverbial form of "easily", so:

"Can I get a job in Germany more easily?" Or if you want to put more emphasis on the fact that getting a job is easier with fluency in the German language: "Can I get a job in Germany more easily?"

At German universities, most courses are in German.

But for international students, universities also offer their courses in English.

Some courses are also offered as a combination of English and German. For example, 70% English and 30% German. (For this you need to complete at least the C1 level of German language only then you can opt for such a course).

If you are planning to take a course at a German university, it will always be beneficial to have a considerable knowledge of the German language.

You can also find the information about the courses and also the languages ​​in which the cou

Keep reading

At German universities, most courses are in German.

But for international students, universities also offer their courses in English.

Some courses are also offered as a combination of English and German. For example, 70% English and 30% German. (For this you need to complete at least the C1 level of German language only then you can opt for such a course).

If you are planning to take a course at a German university, it will always be beneficial to have a considerable knowledge of the German language.

You can also find the information about the courses and also the languages ​​in which the courses are offered on their respective sites.

Knowing German is not mandatory if you want to study in Germany and the course you choose is offered in English. But remember, knowledge of the native language will always help you!

But if you plan to take a job in Germany, it is surely mandatory that you can communicate fluently in German.

That is why it is advisable to learn a little German before moving to Germany for your studies.

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