Can I do a doctorate in computer science after a master's degree in computer science?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Bryson Wilson



Can I do a doctorate in computer science after a master's degree in computer science?

The first thing you should do is check the admission requirements of the places where you would like to do your doctorate. This should guide you whether or not an M.Tech is needed after M.Sc for those places.

In the event that you end up doing your PhD at a place that accepted M.Sc degrees, once you've done a good Ph.D, it doesn't matter if you only had M.Sc before that or both M.Sc and M.Tech.

Yes, why not? Most central universities and some IIT and NIT offer PhD admission to MSc CS students. However, in some IITs and NITs, MTech is required to pursue a PhD in Computer Science.

It is a challenge. Neither simple (easy) nor in the unfeasible limit (very difficult).

The notion that something is easy or difficult is subjective. That is why it is difficult to give a reasonable answer. Also, even for the same person, the level of difficulty can change over time.

Let's divide the program in a chronological sequence (I'm talking about my experience at Stanford; other universities may differ):

  1. Enter: Difficult
    This is objectively difficult. As Igor Markov mentioned, you compete with people from all over the world. Those admitted are among the best minds in the world. Luck plays a huge role
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It is a challenge. Neither simple (easy) nor in the unfeasible limit (very difficult).

The notion that something is easy or difficult is subjective. That is why it is difficult to give a reasonable answer. Also, even for the same person, the level of difficulty can change over time.

Let's divide the program in a chronological sequence (I'm talking about my experience at Stanford; other universities may differ):

  1. Enter: Difficult
    This is objectively difficult. As Igor Markov mentioned, you compete with people from all over the world. Those admitted are among the best minds in the world. Luck plays a very important role.
  2. Course Requirements: Annoying / Tedious
    These can be tedious. Some courses are time consuming (SO) and you will have to spend a lot of time to get a good grade.
  3. Selecting an Advisor and Research Direction: Moderately Difficult It
    can be challenging to convince yourself that you have made the right decision. It can also be challenging to convince your advisor that you are capable of doing a _great_ PhD (see below). If you can't do both, you will get a Ph.D., but you will be destined for disgrace.
  4. Qualification exams: Tedious (rarely difficult)
    Requires proficiency in some subareas. Usually not difficult, but I have seen quite a few people fail and / or get a conditional pass.
  5. Investigate :
    • A novel / interdisciplinary thesis: very difficult
      Novel here would mean that you develop your primary research ideas, develop the necessary infrastructure to test them, and then execute them. This is extraordinarily challenging. The (very real) risk of failure can cause enough stress to paralyze most people. With that said, if you are successful, it could help you build a successful academic career.
    • A "Supervised" Thesis - Simple
      Remember, you don't have to have a completely new thesis. Students often rely heavily on general research conducted by their advisor. Usually this is not difficult. In the rare case that you get stuck, your advisor can usually help you. In addition, most of the uncertainty is eliminated. This does not mean that you will not have problems.
  1. Scope: Moderately Challenging
    After doing your research, you will need to convince people outside of your university that you are good. In general, this is a challenge. The people at your university have a great interest in your success. The rest of the world does not.
  2. Developing a Long-Term Research Program - Very Difficult
    No matter what you do, people are likely to be better at almost everything else. As such, developing a career in research requires a strategy to identify and leverage your unique abilities. This is very, very difficult. As a consequence, very few students (~ 10-20% at Stanford) get an academic position.
    Unfortunately, rejection is generally not easy to handle at this stage.

Also see this answer for some random reasons why doing a PhD is difficult in general - Samir Menon's answer to What's the hardest part about being a PhD student?

I am a direct PhD student, however I did not jump into my PhD course immediately upon graduation. I took a year off, worked two jobs, and basically thought about my career direction. At the end of the gap year, I still wanted to do whatever I wanted at the end of my graduation. I was lucky to get a PhD position.

These are some of the pros and cons from my perspective.

Pros:

  1. Being able to work on something that you are passionate about is probably the greatest feeling of self-fulfillment.
  2. In research, you are making history, boldly going where no man has gone before. I thi
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I am a direct PhD student, however I did not jump into my PhD course immediately upon graduation. I took a year off, worked two jobs, and basically thought about my career direction. At the end of the gap year, I still wanted to do whatever I wanted at the end of my graduation. I was lucky to get a PhD position.

These are some of the pros and cons from my perspective.

Pros:

  1. Being able to work on something that you are passionate about is probably the greatest feeling of self-fulfillment.
  2. In research, you are making history, boldly going where no man has gone before. I think that's exciting.
  3. You will end up with an advanced degree at a very young age.
  4. You have time to decide which career path to choose after graduation. You can diversify, because you will have time.
  5. You will impress most of the people in the scientific community and you will see yourself as an ambitious researcher.
  6. You will never fear failure, but you will learn to accept it and do everything you can to fix it.

Cons:

  1. After living with the security of monthly paychecks, it's hard to relive student life with a barely enough allowance.
  2. Your friends are working, making money, and living life. Sometimes it feels like you're stuck in one place for too long; however, you should know that you are making progress and will eventually reach your goals.
  3. Social life tends to keep to itself most of the time. His social circle mainly involves his lab buddies and hanging out in the lab.

At the end of the day, it is your decision and how you weigh your advantages and disadvantages.

Good luck! :)

I am a CS PhD student at USC (just finished 4th year). Let me share my personal experience, I hope it helps you.
- Immediately after obtaining my MS (in CS) I had the opportunity to start my PhD, but I decided not to. I decided to have experience working in the industry first and then decide.
- I worked for about 3 years in three different companies. (A good experience, a good experience and an uninteresting one)
- I spent about 1 year deciding whether the PhD is for me or not. He actively spoke to relevant people and asked for their opinions. I spoke to many PhD students, many in

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I am a CS PhD student at USC (just finished 4th year). Let me share my personal experience, I hope it helps you.
- Immediately after obtaining my MS (in CS) I had the opportunity to start my PhD, but I decided not to. I decided to have experience working in the industry first and then decide.
- I worked for about 3 years in three different companies. (A good experience, a good experience and an uninteresting one)
- I spent about 1 year deciding whether the PhD is for me or not. He actively spoke to relevant people and asked for their opinions. I spoke with many PhD students, many industry veterans, and some members of the faculty. Finally, I decided to start my PhD.
- Since I started my PhD, at least once a year I have had thoughts about leaving the PhD. This period usually lasts between 2 and 3 weeks and during that time I have doubts about everything! So, believe me, I understand your question.
- Based on the advice / feedback I received from the people I spoke to during my "one year decision", the experience I gained over 4 years of my PhD and also two internship opportunities that I had (at a major tech company) , here is my take:

a) DO NOT continue / start PhD if you don't LOVE (your) research.
b) DO NOT continue / start your PhD if MONEY is your FIRST priority.
c) DO NOT continue / start the PhD because you have no other option at this time.

If none of the above applies to you:
d) DO NOT quit because there is a good opportunity that pays well!
e) DO NOT resign because you feel that your advisor does not understand you or because it gives you a hard time.
f) DON'T quit because other people tell you there is no point in doing a PhD, or because the PhD is not your thing (to be honest, I don't think the PhD is for 95% of people).

If you want to continue with the doctorate, keep in mind that
g) The doctorate is NOT about the final degree, it is about the trip.
h) The PhD is NOT about (just) your thesis and a specific field of study, it is about general skills that you gain that can be applied to all areas of your life (how to tackle difficult problems, how to objectively assess something, how to motivate, how to market / sell your ideas / theories, how to learn from others ...)

It seems like you need more exposure to graduate-level research to find out what you really want. You should only dedicate the 5-6 years and thesis work if you have a true passion for research in your chosen area. Probably your best strategy, if you can do it, is to get into a good PhD program and start getting that exposure. You may end up switching advisors or subfields once you know more, and after a couple of years (taking part-time courses), you may ask yourself the question: Do I really love research and want to continue, or would I? I will be happier doing a master's degree (u

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It seems like you need more exposure to graduate-level research to find out what you really want. You should only dedicate the 5-6 years and thesis work if you have a true passion for research in your chosen area. Probably your best strategy, if you can do it, is to get into a good PhD program and start getting that exposure. You may end up switching advisors or subfields once you know more, and after a couple of years (taking part-time courses), you may ask yourself the question: Do I really love research and want to continue, or would I? I'm happier getting a master's degree (usually an option at the moment for those who don't want to continue) and taking an industrial job. If you've done well, you should have a lot of good options.

Alternatively, in some schools / departments (CMU / LTI is one of them) you can join a research-oriented master's program and that amounts to more or less the same strategy as above - divide the time between essentially the same courses as I would take in the PhD program and doing some research with an advisor. If you do well in research, you will likely have the option of pursuing a PhD program at the same school or a different school, and most or all of the courses will be out of the way, so finishing the PhD at 2 -3 years from then on is quite common. If you are not doing well in research (but you pass your courses) or you do not want to continue, you have the master's degree and many good options.

So the point is, you don't need to make an irrevocable decision right now, and there are ways to gather the information and experience you need to make a good decision. You'd be wasting a couple of high-earning years in a hot market, but at least you'd be getting a worthy master's degree.

A2A. Let me rephrase your question from what I can get as far as your goals set out in the details. What is the next step after completing my MSCS degree if I want to pursue a technical career?

The next step is to get a job as a developer and see what training you need to keep up-to-date and advance your career. It's too easy to consider more education, but once you get a job, you need to focus on the required industry certifications that depend on your master's specialization and current employment. Once you have an industrial background, you can search for academic MO

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A2A. Let me rephrase your question from what I can get as far as your goals set out in the details. What is the next step after completing my MSCS degree if I want to pursue a technical career?

The next step is to get a job as a developer and see what training you need to keep up-to-date and advance your career. It's too easy to consider more education, but once you get a job, you need to focus on the required industry certifications that depend on your master's specialization and current employment. Once you have an industrial background, you can seek academic MOOC training. If you are fully committed to your work, you most likely don't have free time to code outside of work. However, what is extremely important is maintaining a support system that includes your family, your partner, and your friends; there is more to life than work.

With the exception of management who has not expressed interest, the only technical title that remains is a doctorate in which he learns at least three specializations, takes the qualification exams. and get started on your original research (think state of the art) under the supervision of an advisor and committee. I never recommend applying for a full-time Ph.D. until you are ready to take the qualifying exams.

Bottom line: no more technical training unless you can't get a job as a developer. Once you've settled into a job, usually one year, you would first do the industry certifications followed by MOOC specializations that prepare you for qualification exams in case you decide you are really interested in working on the state of the art.

I just registered for a Master of Science in Computer Science. I think the short answer to your question is Yes.

Yet why do you doubt yourself so much? Be more confident and try it fairly. That is, don't get busy working in the industry full time, and waste time watching TV or on social media, and then settle for the results that your IQ is not high enough.

State your goals clearly, a PhD is not a goal in itself. After earning your PhD, you can choose between two main streams: applying for a scholarship in academia or working on R&D in industry.

Here are two videos you should be pursuing a PhD for:

Keep reading

I just registered for a Master of Science in Computer Science. I think the short answer to your question is Yes.

Yet why do you doubt yourself so much? Be more confident and try it fairly. That is, don't get busy working in the industry full time, and waste time watching TV or on social media, and then settle for the results that your IQ is not high enough.

State your goals clearly, a PhD is not a goal in itself. After earning your PhD, you can choose between two main streams: applying for a scholarship in academia or working on R&D in industry.

Here are two videos you should be pursuing a PhD for:

Choosing a PhD in Computer Science: Choosing a PhD in Computer Science

You have to become familiar with theoretical computing such as automata theory, game theory, computational complexity theory, algorithm analysis, discrete mathematics, linear programming ... Etc.

Not having a deep and solid understanding of the basics can make you back off and think it's because your IQ isn't high enough again.

You cannot build a skyscraper starting with the roof. Start at the foundations.

Maybe. What are your career aspirations? Do you like being a student? What does your university degree consist of? Where did you graduate from? Did you enjoy studying there? Do you like to investigate? Have you had the opportunity to do it? What fields of computer science interest you? What schools are you thinking of? Do you have the qualifications and recommendations to enter these schools? What is your financial situation? Family situation? In which country are you or are you thinking of moving?

Even if we knew the answers to all these questions, it would probably be impossible to determine whether a Ph.D. in computer science is "worth it" for you. How

Keep reading

Maybe. What are your career aspirations? Do you like being a student? What does your university degree consist of? Where did you graduate from? Did you enjoy studying there? Do you like to investigate? Have you had the opportunity to do it? What fields of computer science interest you? What schools are you thinking of? Do you have the qualifications and recommendations to enter these schools? What is your financial situation? Family situation? In which country are you or are you thinking of moving?

Even if we knew the answers to all these questions, it would probably be impossible to determine whether a Ph.D. in computer science is "worth it" for you. As it stands, we don't know anything about any of those answers. Seriously, you can't wait for a helpful answer.

A doctorate in computer science offers the opportunity to become a leading researcher in a very important field with potential for transformative research. Consider it especially if you want to enter the computer science academy or do high-level research in the industry and expect to be in the top 30% of PhD candidates.

Pros:

  • The high impact potential of your research.
  • Opportunity to become an AI expert.
  • Freedom to search for the research topics that interest you most.
  • Very smart companions.
  • Helps you get into technical jobs in industry, providing an endorsement to academia (although if industry is your goal, chances are that
Keep reading

A doctorate in computer science offers the opportunity to become a leading researcher in a very important field with potential for transformative research. Consider it especially if you want to enter the computer science academy or do high-level research in the industry and expect to be in the top 30% of PhD candidates.

Pros:

  • The high impact potential of your research.
  • Opportunity to become an AI expert.
  • Freedom to search for the research topics that interest you most.
  • Very smart companions.
  • Helps you enter technical jobs in industry, providing an endorsement to academia (although if industry is your goal, it is probably best to enter directly)

Cons:

  • Less than 10% end up with permanent jobs.
  • It takes a long time (5-7 years), with a relatively low salary.
  • Doing very open research provides little feedback which can be demotivating.
  • About half of those who enter the industry later do not end up in research positions.

Mainly teaching opportunities at engineering universities. If the institute from which you did your PhD is one of the best, you can apply to the IIts or NITs for assistant professor or equivalent positions.

You can also apply to the R&D divisions of IT companies. Again, this depends on the Institute from where you did your doctorate and the area of ​​your research. You can definitely apply to the research labs of service companies like TCS or Accenture. If your institute is one of the best and your thesis is on a "hot topic" like artificial intelligence or image processing, you can also try joining Amazon, Google

Keep reading

Mainly teaching opportunities at engineering universities. If the institute from which you did your PhD is one of the best, you can apply to the IIts or NITs for assistant professor or equivalent positions.

You can also apply to the R&D divisions of IT companies. Again, this depends on the Institute from where you did your doctorate and the area of ​​your research. You can definitely apply to the research labs of service companies like TCS or Accenture. If your institute is one of the best and your thesis is on a "hot topic" like artificial intelligence or image processing, you can also try joining Amazon, Google, or Microsoft.

you can do PHD after M.Tech and MSc, but differences arise when you apply for asst. Prof. at any engineering school. There are different eligibility criteria for different positions. If you want to apply for any position related to computer science and engineering, you have to do B.tech, M.tech and then PHD. MCA and MSc are not eligible to apply for the B.Tech program. They are only eligible for the MCA and MSc programs.

The Master of Science in Computer Science can be earned only by those who have completed a Bachelor's degree. in Computer Science or Information Technology. Whereas M.Tech in Computer Science can be pursued by B.Tech, MCA or BSc gra

Keep reading

you can do PHD after M.Tech and MSc, but differences arise when you apply for asst. Prof. at any engineering school. There are different eligibility criteria for different positions. If you want to apply for any position related to computer science and engineering, you have to do B.tech, M.tech and then PHD. MCA and MSc are not eligible to apply for the B.Tech program. They are only eligible for the MCA and MSc programs.

The Master of Science in Computer Science can be earned only by those who have completed a Bachelor's degree. in Computer Science or Information Technology. While M.Tech in Computer Science can be pursued by graduates of B.Tech, MCA or BSc.

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