Can civil engineers work in IT companies?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Scott Walker



Can civil engineers work in IT companies?

Entry-level jobs in most IT companies, especially large ones, are subject to massive hiring and do not require a very high level of skills or knowledge. They are also very poorly paid. If I remember correctly, in the last 12 years the starter package has increased by less than 50%. Also the fact to be noted is that most private IT colleges are pretty bad and it is also reflected in the level of IT graduates. On the other hand, civil engineering is offered only by older and traditional private universities or government-run universities where getting admission is more difficult and so is the quality of graduates.

Keep reading

Entry-level jobs in most IT companies, especially large ones, are subject to massive hiring and do not require a very high level of skills or knowledge. They are also very poorly paid. If I remember correctly, in the last 12 years the starter package has increased by less than 50%. Also the fact to be noted is that most private IT colleges are pretty bad and it is also reflected in the level of IT graduates. On the other hand, Civil Engineering is offered only by the older and traditional private universities or the government-run universities where getting admission is more difficult and therefore also better the quality of graduates. Also, in the current scenario, all engineers, regardless of branch,

Since most large companies essentially train their new recruits internally, it makes perfect sense for them to recruit even civil engineers from better universities. The problem I would feel is the other way around. I'm pretty sure IIT or NIT civil engineers won't join these IT companies because the starter package is too low. I remember in 2004, 2005 starting salaries in IT companies were equal to or higher than starting salaries of bank POs, but today it is possibly equal to bank employees.

They Yes. In fact, many of them would choose IT and other non-essential jobs as their full-time career option. I am also a civilized Engg. Graduates and during our recruiting season, I have witnessed several IT companies (namely Infosys, Wipro, TCS, etc.) come to our campus and hire over 200 new engineers. graduates of all kinds of branches. And, the irony is that "most of the students who had been placed in these IT companies were from Mechanics and other branches." Even many of my friends and batchmates are currently working there.

If you have a passion for something and once you got some experience

Keep reading

They Yes. In fact, many of them would choose IT and other non-essential jobs as their full-time career option. I am also a civilized Engg. Graduates and during our recruiting season, I have witnessed several IT companies (namely Infosys, Wipro, TCS, etc.) come to our campus and hire over 200 new engineers. graduates of all kinds of branches. And, the irony is that "most of the students who had been placed in these IT companies were from Mechanics and other branches." Even many of my friends and batchmates are currently working there.

If you have a passion for something and once you've gained some experience with it, then no one, I repeat, no one gives a shit about your education background.

The bottom line is that "engineers can do anything"!

Thanks for reading ☺

To be honest, having a title in the XYZ field doesn't always mean that you should work only in the XYZ field. I have seen many engineers, especially with Civil experience, migrate to IT.

Yes, it is true that you will need certain characteristics to match the given profile, but there is always the possibility, especially in the non-tech divisions.

This will make you happy: I was a Google Student Ambassador (GSA), 2013-14 and our program manager, permanently employed at Google, was a civil engineer! Also, the HR guy who took my interview was a chemical engineer! So you see, possibility

Keep reading

To be honest, having a title in the XYZ field doesn't always mean that you should work only in the XYZ field. I have seen many engineers, especially with Civil experience, migrate to IT.

Yes, it is true that you will need certain characteristics to match the given profile, but there is always the possibility, especially in the non-tech divisions.

This will make you happy: I was a Google Student Ambassador (GSA), 2013-14 and our program manager, permanently employed at Google, was a civil engineer! Also, the HR guy who took my interview was a chemical engineer! As you can see, the possibilities are endless, especially with a firm like Google.

I am a civil engineer. Working in an IT company.

If you are only willing to enter the information technology sector, the answer is yes.

But it will take some time to adjust this environment and get into the desired field.

You can try really hard to get into some service-based business through college campus, which is the easiest way.

Otherwise, you have to attend some training classes that will refer you to IT companies.

Strive in the initial time, all the best

Short answer: yes.

Explanation -

If you are cooler or still doing single, this option is wide open.

Reason: Most of the work that needs to be done to update the software is to debug the software. To do this, they give extensive training on the language.

If you already have a background in civil engineering then it is not recommended unless "IT" is your passion.

Reason: you will start your career from level 0. And so will your salary;)

Yes, there are so many people who work here with no experience,

First of all, you must learn C and C ++ to have basic programming skills.

Give another 10 to 12 months to learn the programming language (study)

many languages ​​are available here, such as if you are interested in mobile development, then learn ios, Android, etc. (the future is good in ios) if you are interested in web development then you must learn java php asp ect (the future is good in Java, Python and JS languages)

If you find the programming language difficult to learn ... you can choose your career as a designer.

I hope this helps

Getting a job in IT isn't limited by your flow. Most of the mechanical and civil engineering students working in IT companies, even some of the companies during the hiring process, do not even ask about their flow, but only ask for an engineering degree.

You may not be able to get the IT job involving the main application of cs engg or coding etc, otherwise you can get into IT.

Yes, they can be implemented in service-based jobs that don't require a lot of coding. Most service-based IT companies don't give a shit about their engineering branch. They train you for work and deploy you. They even give you training in coding and want you to develop codes: it's difficult, but people learn by fighting.

Yes! The civil engineer can get a job in the IT sector, but the condition is that they have knowledge and certificates of computer languages ​​and technologies such as java, c, python, html and php, etc. But only some of the companies offer the job for non-IT.

Just learning to code.

Learning has become very accessible and convenient thanks to our internet. And as a graduate engineer, you already have a technical bent. So it should make things easier for you. You will need to acquire at least one language or technology that is currently being used in IT and work to learn it.

The rest of the IT industry is like any other job.

I hope that helps.

Yes, why not. Civil engineers can opt for many multinational companies like Infosys, Accenture, Wipro, TCS and the like. If you love coding, there is nothing wrong with joining the IT sector after doing BTech in the civilian branch.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.