Can a new graduate student get a job at Tesla Motors or SpaceX? If so, how is it requested?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Oliver Wyatt



Can a new graduate student get a job at Tesla Motors or SpaceX? If so, how is it requested?

I'm not sure about SpaceX, but I know that Tesla hires a lot of industrial engineers for my school's operations / supply chain analyst role. They have excellent cooperative programs and internships. You can go to their website and apply or alternatively ask your career center to schedule a campus visit.

Edit: I recently found out that SpaceX doesn't hire any international students due to the gun restriction, but Tesla does hire and seems to be on a streak right now. Good luck!

Yes, new graduates are hired all the time at Tesla and SpaceX. In fact, I was hired and started a month before officially graduating.

Contact a recruiter with a position you would like to apply for, or at least inform them of an area in which you are interested.

you have to be incredibly special for that to happen.

Alright, I'm really qualified to answer this question. feel free to PM me to discuss in more detail as I had the same question myself (and answered it to some extent).

Unfortunately, the answer is not straightforward. It is a yes and a no.

Because if?

  • Tesla is doing interesting things. the valley depends on the word of the journalists reporting on Elon's next plan. Wherever you go, people will want to talk to you about Tesla. While interning at Tesla, an Uber driver thanked me over and over again for working at such a noble and excellent company. You will really feel that you are making the world a better place. Never mind
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Alright, I'm really qualified to answer this question. feel free to PM me to discuss in more detail as I had the same question myself (and answered it to some extent).

Unfortunately, the answer is not straightforward. It is a yes and a no.

Because if?

  • Tesla is doing interesting things. the valley depends on the word of the journalists reporting on Elon's next plan. Wherever you go, people will want to talk to you about Tesla. While interning at Tesla, an Uber driver thanked me over and over again for working at such a noble and excellent company. You will really feel that you are making the world a better place. No matter where I interview, people skip the Google section of my resume and want to tell me about the Tesla part (even two years later). This is a great advantage for the network side. If you can really sell yourself and you're not afraid to improve your resume, Tesla may be a great place.
  • It's been a while, so take this with a grain of salt. Tesla has a lot of rotation and they move fast. This means you have many opportunities to lead new initiatives and replace previous leaders. Can you be creative enough to create solutions before people ask you? If so, Tesla is the place for you.

Why not? This list is longer, but don't be too quick to ignore the previous two points. If you can think outside the box, the last two points will be invaluable to you.

  • The quality of the software simply does not exist. Have you just started your career? Well, you're out of luck. Turnover is high, so don't expect people to invest in you. A place like Google is like University 2.0. You have a great mentor ship and tons of resources at your disposal. Not so at Tesla: learning is a litmus test. If you manage, it's because you work hard, not smart. Anything you learn is a bonus (Granted, some people learn better this way).
  • Tesla is a maquiladora. If you want to change the world (and I mean * really * change the world, not just display emojis to a billion people), then you have to work for it. Google is heaven. How much does it cost to you to build electric vehicles?
  • Google pays better. Better. And the bonuses will be better. The action will be better. End of story. Don't work at Tesla for cash. You will not get a large amount of capital. You are not employee number ten.
  • Expect to stay at Tesla for two years or so. Did I mention that attrition is high? The closer you get to Elon, the shorter your stay will be. You will probably burn yourself. If you're the type to run out, join Tesla. You will prosper. I'm not sure Google will even allow you to get burned.
  • If you work closer to the hardware, you will learn more and it will be valuable. Do you want to be a software engineer of all kinds? Tesla will be worse for you. Anything to do with cloud services will be secondary to your mission (except in some circumstances where it is a bottleneck for them). Do you work on autopilot? Stay, you are very valuable to them. Work in a profit center, not a cost center, no matter where you go. Always stay as close to the main mission as possible

Well. I think I have rambled long enough. If you (or anyone else) have any further questions about this type of decision, please email me. I'd love to talk to you about it.

There are many ways to justify it with beautiful and noble language, but the reality is that they do it because they can get away with it. Like any other company (Google and Facebook included). No one will pay an employee $ 200k if he works for $ 100k.

<rant>

"Not wanting to hire people primarily motivated by money"? That is so embarrassing and the attitude is so abusive towards employees that if a Tesla recruiter contacts me (they have done it a few times) and says that to me, I would probably stop responding immediately.

“I want to join a company that wants to change the world and doesn't mind paying their

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There are many ways to justify it with beautiful and noble language, but the reality is that they do it because they can get away with it. Like any other company (Google and Facebook included). No one will pay an employee $ 200k if he works for $ 100k.

<rant>

"Not wanting to hire people primarily motivated by money"? That is so embarrassing and the attitude is so abusive towards employees that if a Tesla recruiter contacts me (they have done it a few times) and says that to me, I would probably stop responding immediately.

"I want to join a company that wants to change the world and does not mind paying its employees more than they are worth to get and retain the best employees." Do you see how it can be turned both ways?

If you're really only interested in creating great products and changing the world, why not pay your employees more so they don't have to worry so much about everyday life? Why not pay your employees more so they can live closer, have a shorter commute, and rest better? Why not pay your employees more so they don't have to worry about not sending enough money home to their family? Or should they put "changing the world" above their families too?

</rant>

There is nothing wrong with using the potential for impact to attract employees. That's what Google does too, especially in the higher research groups. But using it as an excuse to make employees feel bad (and not like engineers) for wanting a higher salary is abusive.

At Google, they don't just expect you to do your part to change the world. They also do their part by providing world-class compensation and benefits, so you can focus on doing your job and feeling appreciated.

It's true that most of Google's employees aren't doing really groundbreaking things.

That is also true for Tesla. As a company, they are doing a lot of cool things, like Google, but individually? Are all the employees doing cool things, running cool experiments, and blowing things up?

In short, I don't think Tesla is specifically targeting just one type of university. But let me develop a bit.

Tesla generally likes the following (and other companies are likely to feel the same way too)

  • They want you to join after your internship (as long as your performance is average or better). The time and effort to train an intern is really expensive and the company is always hiring. Honestly, what company would want to train someone, just to have them leave?
  • They like universities with programs that integrate industry expertise into the undergraduate / graduate curriculum. For example, many Canadian universities
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In short, I don't think Tesla is specifically targeting just one type of university. But let me develop a bit.

Tesla generally likes the following (and other companies are likely to feel the same way too)

  • They want you to join after your internship (as long as your performance is average or better). The time and effort to train an intern is really expensive and the company is always hiring. Honestly, what company would want to train someone, just to have them leave?
  • They like universities with programs that integrate industry expertise into the undergraduate / graduate curriculum. For example, many Canadian universities require students to complete CoOps before graduation. The ideal situation for Tesla would be if he did what it takes to cooperate after all his courses, but before graduation. So that once you complete the internship and perform well, they can extend an offer right away.
  • Usually they like third year, fourth year, masters, PhD students for their interns. You know enough to know what's going on, plus you'll be looking full time soon.
  • (For the sake of this point, I will choose MechEng.) Each school will have a different mechanical engineering program. For example, I know that Boston University graduate students and many go into industry. Its curriculum has manufacturing / supply chain courses. On the other hand, my school at UC San Diego is a research-based institution. We do not have a manufacturing / supply chain course. There are no MechEng graduates with exposure to manufacturing. Tesla doesn't visit UCSD that often. However, I still have an internship and I am a biomedical engineer.

In short, Tesla doesn't 'head' to schools for interns, so don't think so closed. They are looking for exceptional people who are potentially ideal for internships. Of course, it is easier to hire interns at certain schools like Canadian universities, but Tesla hires from all schools. They want to see passion, hard work, relevant experience, and if they would be willing to sit next to you for the next six months, etc.

See my other post on How to Get an Internship at Tesla.

I am not working on OpenAI, but I will try to give an answer (which is just my personal opinion.

1.

First of all, you will probably need some concrete contributions to the research community, for example publications.

OpenAI is one of the best research institutes and as any research institute would, they should evaluate people from their articles.

Since OpenAI's current interest is deep reinforcement learning, it would be better if your research was related to it in some way, but it may not be necessary or sufficient - OpenAI's ultimate goal is not limited to deep RL.

2.

Second, they will judge if you have real professionals.

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I am not working on OpenAI, but I will try to give an answer (which is just my personal opinion.

1.

First of all, you will probably need some concrete contributions to the research community, for example publications.

OpenAI is one of the best research institutes and as any research institute would, they should evaluate people from their articles.

Since OpenAI's current interest is deep reinforcement learning, it would be better if your research was related to it in some way, but it may not be necessary or sufficient - OpenAI's ultimate goal is not limited to deep RL.

2.

Second, they will judge whether you have real problem solving skills.

As OpenAI claims, their goal is to create "safe" and "beneficial" AI. This means that it is not enough to be able to invent new deep learning models or training algorithms:

Does your method scan and perform safely in a real environment outside of the lab? What security criteria should you consider (during training time and testing time) to maintain that you have built a “safe” AI and how can you achieve this? What does it mean to create “beneficial” AI and how can it be achieved? For example, what specific rewards or target actions should you give the AI ​​to make it behave in desirable ways?

All of these remain challenging open-ended problems, and solving them requires more than your computer skills.

In short, it's probably not about your connection or past experience. It really is about whether you can actually do something in OpenAI.

I know a friend who studied a degree in Mechanical Engineering in Lucknow and then went to the United States to get a master's degree in Engineering Management. He applied for a job in Tesla motors and now works there as an intern. Mainly, mechanical, electrical and electronic engineers have good chances to work at Tesla Motors. Tesla is currently working on mass production of the Model 3 and is facing many problems due to high public demand. Your goal is to build an electric car for the masses, which will require trained professionals in a variety of fields such as engineering management, plant automation, production.

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I know a friend who studied a degree in Mechanical Engineering in Lucknow and then went to the United States to get a master's degree in Engineering Management. He applied for a job in Tesla motors and now works there as an intern. Mainly, mechanical, electrical and electronic engineers have good chances to work at Tesla Motors. Tesla is currently working on mass production of the Model 3 and is facing many problems due to high public demand. Your goal is to build an electric car for the masses, which will require trained professionals in a variety of fields such as engineering management, plant automation, production management, supply chain and inventory management, quality assurance, etc.

Tesla also just revealed the SEMI, which is a semi-electric truck. They will also begin production of the semi in 2020 and are in expansion mode in the US.

Additionally, Tesla is working on autonomous and AI-enabled cars. Therefore, even computer science students with good knowledge of data science and artificial intelligence have a good chance of working at Tesla. All car companies will require data scientists, as cars connect to the internet and generate a large amount of data as they travel the world.

Elon Musk is also building the Gigafactory, which will be the world's largest lithium-ion battery production factory. Once up and running, it is expected to dramatically lower the cost of lithium-ion batteries and further lower the prices of electric vehicles. The reason electric cars are perceived to be expensive is the cost of the battery. Once the mass production of the lithium ion battery begins, it will be a game changer in the electric vehicle industry. A reason for electrical engineers to party !!!!

The hiring process at SpaceX is a bit crazy and actually ended up being a big problem for me as the whole time I was there I was unable to grow my team.

The last year I was there I had a permanent weekly meeting with the CIO and HR to filter a bunch of resumes. There were a bunch of hiring restrictions, like ITAR, and then we had our own internal rules on top of that for submitting resumes. So we would take the best of that vintage and program phone screens, usually starting with a basic cultural setting and then doing 3-5 more phone interviews, some with coding in place.

Yes, and

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The hiring process at SpaceX is a bit crazy and actually ended up being a big problem for me as the whole time I was there I was unable to grow my team.

The last year I was there I had a permanent weekly meeting with the CIO and HR to filter a bunch of resumes. There were a bunch of hiring restrictions, like ITAR, and then we had our own internal rules on top of that for submitting resumes. So we would take the best of that vintage and program phone screens, usually starting with a basic cultural setting and then doing 3-5 more phone interviews, some with coding in place.

If you got the go-ahead from everyone who examined you over the phone, we invite you to take a tour and then do approximately 6 consecutive interviews (usually ending with the CIO) in which two SpaceXers interrogate you differently. areas. Take most of the day seriously.

If someone votes no for the candidate, they will not be hired.

Now this is what hiring was like in my department specifically; culture may vary a bit within the company. However, even if everyone signs you, there is one more gateway. However, it is company-wide policy that all full-time hires must be approved by Gwynne and Elon.

It's a very intense process and while frustrating at times, it got me working with some of the most talented amazing people!

In my opinion, your best bet would be to walk in the door with a contract or an internship, where the requirements are not that strict, and then prove yourself with your work once you are there. That's what I ended up doing!

Oh, and someone in another answer had mentioned that SpaceX has its own ice cream bar, which is half true; it's really one frozen yogurt bar (and there are two!). There are also baristas and kitchen staff for the restaurant.


Disclaimer: I am a former SpaceX employee, nothing I say should be construed as a statement or opinion by or on behalf of SpaceX and / or Tesla Motors. For official press inquiries, please email: media@spacex.com or press@teslamotors.com

I can't speak to Tesla specifically, but this is how I would approach it.

  1. I would connect to the company on purpose. This means meeting people who work at Tesla. As many people as you can, in the jobs they have. The idea is to build an internal network within Tesla of people who know you and support your candidacy.
  2. I would study the company and during my networking, I would learn everything I can. You want to be able to articulate the pain the hiring manager is feeling and why you are the pain medicine.
  3. Use social media to your advantage. Join the forums and gr
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I can't speak to Tesla specifically, but this is how I would approach it.

  1. I would connect to the company on purpose. This means meeting people who work at Tesla. As many people as you can, in the jobs they have. The idea is to build an internal network within Tesla of people who know you and support your candidacy.
  2. I would study the company and during my networking, I would learn everything I can. You want to be able to articulate the pain the hiring manager is feeling and why you are the pain medicine.
  3. Use social media to your advantage. Join forums and groups that Tesla hiring managers are likely to be a part of and get involved. Share your knowledge, ask interesting questions, and help others. Build a strong social media presence that amplifies your strengths and shows you have the skills and experience to be a pain remedy.
  4. Align your social media apps: Linked In, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Quora, and others should be in sync with your resume and job board posts.
  5. Volunteer at charity events Tesla supports. This is a great opportunity to meet people who work at Tesla and have them introduce you to other people who work at Tesla.
  6. Attend conferences that Tesla employees in your field of interest attend.
  7. Hang out at the lunch spots Tesla employees are likely to frequent. As your internal Tesla network grows, you will likely recognize people you have met before and have the opportunity to introduce you to other people.
  8. Become a master at informational interviewing and networking.
  9. Networking is a two-way street. Ask how you can help.

Hope this helps you.

The short answer is no, on both counts.

If you look at Glassdoor, you'll find that the median salary is significantly higher than the national averages for almost everything; yes, Tesla generally doesn't pay as much as the big Bay Area tech companies you know. Apples, Googles, and Microsofts pay about 10% more to full-time employees.

Also, when I worked at Tesla, no one on my team worked overtime. That's correct, nobody. I worked a total of 3 overtime hours (just accumulated an additional 10 minutes here and there for 3.5 months) I think. However, there are teams that are incredibly pressured

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The short answer is no, on both counts.

If you look at Glassdoor, you'll find that the median salary is significantly higher than the national averages for almost everything; yes, Tesla generally doesn't pay as much as the big Bay Area tech companies you know. Apples, Googles, and Microsofts pay about 10% more to full-time employees.

Also, when I worked at Tesla, no one on my team worked overtime. That's correct, nobody. I worked a total of 3 overtime hours (just accumulated an additional 10 minutes here and there for 3.5 months) I think. However, there are teams that are incredibly pressed for time. There are interns who have worked 80 hours a week but it was only a week or two at the most. Still, by paying 1.5 times for every hour over 40, you can only imagine how much they were paid. The current salary for interns is around 27 / hr, so I would earn around $ 2,700 a week.

You mentioned that the work would be interesting and you are right. But there's more than that. All Tesla employees are working to help create a world with sustainable transportation, and for me, personally, there is little to compete with the satisfaction that comes from that.

In short, I wouldn't trade my intern experience for anything except a Model S ...

Thank you for reading!

Try to be as specific as possible about some of the problems that you have worked on or solved.

If you are interviewing for a technical position especially, try to be as detailed as possible. No matter who you interview (manager or vice president), everyone will want to know that you've been in the bush with your job.

A good way to think about this is to pick a topic that you have worked on and think about the things that you did which were:

  1. Better / more innovative than is typical in the industry
  2. Faster / more rudimentary than is typical in the industry

Lastly, show passion for the renewable energy company and spa.

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Try to be as specific as possible about some of the problems that you have worked on or solved.

If you are interviewing for a technical position especially, try to be as detailed as possible. No matter who you interview (manager or vice president), everyone will want to know that you've been in the bush with your job.

A good way to think about this is to pick a topic that you have worked on and think about the things that you did which were:

  1. Better / more innovative than is typical in the industry
  2. Faster / more rudimentary than is typical in the industry

Finally, show passion for the company and the renewable energy space. It's very important to Tesla and it's a big part of getting the job.

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