By 2025, how difficult will it be to land a well-paying healthcare job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Rory Lewis



By 2025, how difficult will it be to land a well-paying healthcare job?

A better question will be, how experienced or expert can you be by the year 2025?

The ability to get a high paying job in the healthcare setting will always depend on a person's capabilities. His flexibility, adaptability, work attitude ...

It will be more difficult to be hired, even more difficult to obtain a well-paid position if the person does not have demonstrable effective capacities to carry out the responsibilities associated with the position for which you are applying!

It will be very easy if the person is competent and fully capable of doing the job ...

Not just in the United States. Look at any so-called developed country and you will see that the people who actually literally keep the wheels turning are the least paid.

The best paid are the useless short-term nonessentials.

Let's take a current example.

Truck driver versus politician.

If all the truckers disappeared tomorrow at 6:00 am, what would happen?

Stores would be empty in a few days, people would start starving, and society would collapse very quickly.

If politicians disappeared between 6 and 00 in the morning, it would not change much for a long time, if at all, as there is enough low-level administration to maintain

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Not just in the United States. Look at any so-called developed country and you will see that the people who actually literally keep the wheels turning are the least paid.

The best paid are the useless short-term nonessentials.

Let's take a current example.

Truck driver versus politician.

If all the truckers disappeared tomorrow at 6:00 am, what would happen?

Stores would be empty in a few days, people would start starving, and society would collapse very quickly.

If politicians disappeared between 6 and 00 in the morning, it wouldn't change much for a long time, if at all, as there is enough low-level management to keep the lights on.

In fact, let's lift the lid on the reality of so-called developed culture and you will see that our entire Western way of life has been channeled down a path that will implode itself due to the lack of people to perform basic functions.

Not only that, but the entire system is designed to eliminate these so-called low-grade jobs for the natives of the country and look down on the people who do them.

Yale and Harvard do not offer truck driving degrees that I know of, so America relies on successive waves of desperate immigrants to do the work that highly educated American citizens cannot or do not want to do.

Most countries do this, inviting successive waves of immigration and then trying to shed the resulting offspring who get smart and educated and try to take a slice of American Pie and compete with the natives.

This ass-on-face system works for a while until one day reality dawns and things start to fall apart because a day of reckoning is coming.

Eventually, those who actually do the work will have to charge far more than the minimum wage just to show up, and while the current inflation slump could be considered temporary, it will continue to accelerate now, as external influences and financial stimulus packages have done so. viable for grumpy workers to stay home from work and survive.

The other looming problem is that smarter nations like China have slowly absorbed manufacturing capacity from countries like the United States. They haven't been that stupid and have gradually taken over strategic manufacturing roles in things that were considered low-tech and not worth the hassle, like steel production and even something basic like making nuts and bolts.

Give said politician a truckload of iron ore or some steel rods and ask him to make some steel or some nuts and bolts and you will be waiting a long time for your products.

Is that important? Well, not right now because you can go to Costco and buy the ready-to-use products for just a few dollars.

However, wise because Chinese and American truck drivers and garbage collector tails are about to shake the dog that is the fat belly of what passes for developed society.

The bottom line is that those on the higher end will have to pay at some point. When, who knows, but it could be a good transition or a disastrous fall from a civilization-type collapse.

Edit: to avoid doubts. Take a look at what the US no longer produces. The US can no longer do what it really needs to do.

I'll suggest something based on your filters - high pay, minimal stress, most of the benefits - but I won't call it the "best" job (see the reasons at the end).

My suggestion:

  1. Take an elite MBA with a concentration in Healthcare (or an MHA - Master of Health Administration).
  2. Then spend over 2 years at a large consulting firm, seeking out and courting clients who are established names in healthcare (such as large hospital systems, pharmaceuticals, insurance companies, etc.)
  3. Expect a regulatory tailwind like MACRA (google it). If not, choose one of the waves of change emerging from Obamacare (such as the rise in commercial payment packages).
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I'll suggest something based on your filters - high pay, minimal stress, most of the benefits - but I won't call it the "best" job (see the reasons at the end).

My suggestion:

  1. Take an elite MBA with a concentration in Healthcare (or an MHA - Master of Health Administration).
  2. Then spend over 2 years at a large consulting firm, seeking out and courting clients who are established names in healthcare (such as large hospital systems, pharmaceuticals, insurance companies, etc.)
  3. Expect a regulatory tailwind like MACRA (google it). If not, choose one of the waves of change emerging from Obamacare (such as the rise in commercial payment packages). Note: This assumes that you spend your consulting time really understanding how the healthcare system works in this country.
  4. Once you get close to the hot topic that worries the industry, jump ship and join the executive team of one of your former clients with whom you have established relationships.
  5. Play the executive game: connect 24/7, provide high-level guidance while delegating the actual practical work, blaming the failures on external factors (market conditions, complex technology, bad regulations, etc. .), promote successes, collect your bonuses, age gracefully, retire comfortably.

Why do I suggest this:

  • You wanted 'high pay'. That rules out jobs that have direct patient care responsibilities. How to breastfeed.
  • You want it to be "just stressful." That rules out specialized careers like Surgery because reliance on individual skills and the constant risk of poor results will create stress. Low stress requires you to rank high in the administrative ranks. Further down the totem, there is always someone to answer to, which is a key stressor.
    • Some would say that being the commander-in-chief is stressful too, but that's only if you let it affect you that way.
    • How many times have you seen news about CXO abandoning a sinking ship (or letting go) and never finding the next gig? There is always another company willing to bathe in the light of your wisdom. Or a book to write. Or a speech to give. Or a consulting contract ...

Having said all that, I will not conclude that this route leads to the "best job in health." No one can claim to answer that. Only you know what is best for you. That too if you are lucky and smart enough to know yourself so well at an age when you are just entering the workforce.

Generally speaking, the "best" job in health care is what someone can do without regret, throughout their life. Healthcare careers tend to surprise people - they feel great on paper, but as the layers peel off, they start to get too real and raw. For example, I know too many doctors who 'wish they were in the XYZ race'. Don't be that person. Pick something that will make you jump out of bed every morning and feel excited about going to do it for the rest of the day.

Whatever it is, it will be the best healthcare job for you.

Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

Then why

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Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

So why doesn't everyone get the first job they apply for? (Perhaps these are clearer questions that get to the heart of what you are asking?)

One reason is that the hiring is broken. It is largely a guessing game. The resume is an imperfect tool for demonstrating the critical skills and experience that many jobs require; the interview doesn't measure those actual skills, it just asks you to talk about them; And hiring managers are not hiring experts, they are usually experts in their field of choice.

Managers don't think critically about what they really need from an employee (they really need), and HR departments don't do a good job of helping them define (and make known) those skills and needs. That means that you, as an applicant, read a list of job titles and requirements, and you have to guess if you are fit or not. (So ​​you hedge your bets and apply for a bunch of jobs that you are not fit for, or just WANT to be fit for.)

Develop a resume that consists of a set of words that you have carefully selected and placed in a way that you think will be interesting to the person reading it, and it may or may not be. And you never really find out how it worked (unless you get an interview).

Interviewers ask a lot of questions that don't make sense or don't help them assess whether you would be a good employee or not. They ask stupid questions for which you have a predefined answer, or they ask questions that they should in no way trust your answer. Interviewers have “favorite” questions that they believe are divine “true” answers, but are actually trick questions that the interviewer interprets through their own biases and experience.

Interviews rarely give a candidate the opportunity to really demonstrate their expertise or ease in the skills they will use on the job. The interview is an artificial environment, and it is a scenario that hardly anyone will ever create again when doing their job. Candidates won't talk about what they do, they will. Interviews hire good storytellers.

There is also a strange imbalance of power in hiring. Companies seem to want to keep actual qualifications for the job secret. (This may be because they are very poorly defined and threats of legal action for some of the real reasons. Often times, critical skills for office jobs are work ethic, passion, drive, tact, self-motivation, independence, smart politics, etc., how do you interview someone for those things?) Most of the people you interview are rejected for rather minor reasons. "Cultural adjustment" is a big problem (what does that really mean?). Sometimes a question is answered in a bit of a roundabout way, but the hiring team places enormous importance on anything strange and they tend to exaggerate things. Full candidates are rejected on the mere suspicion of a hiring manager about a given answer! A suspicion!

Candidates often don't have enough information (or power) to ask meaningful questions in return. They have the company's website, Glassdoor, and maybe a friend or two to ask about what the job really entails, or what it's really like to work there, and then if they get an offer, they just accept it.

Interestingly, hiring managers almost always tell us that they don't want to accept the first candidate they interview. Even when that person is a perfect fit! They want to compare them to someone else! Now that's probably pretty understandable, in a way, but I guess hiring would be "easier" for about 15% of openings if the hiring manager hired that perfect first candidate without knowing anyone else. fifteen%!

Finally, some jobs are really complex. They really require what we call a "purple squirrel". It can be two jobs mixed into one and may require a strange combination of strange skills. Every company is different at any point in its history, and matching your current situation with the people who do your work can be tricky. The team you will join is also filled with unique people with their own abilities, flaws, political leanings, and finding the right mix to complement / fight / improve those people is somewhat tricky.

Entire books have been written on these challenges, but few accept the solutions that are offered. Solutions can be time consuming, expensive, and even add significant complexity to a process that you already consider "difficult." Maybe one day you'll be a hiring manager or in charge of hiring, and you can join me in trying to make things better!

It can be difficult for someone to find a high paying job while still in high school. After all, it can be difficult to find a high paying job with just a high school diploma! Some of the challenges in finding a high paying job while still in school include the following:
1. People are reluctant to hire young people
2. It can be difficult to schedule time to work while spending time in school
3. A student His skills are still being developed

However, there are some options to earn money, gain experience, and contribute to the learning process. After all, high school is a time when young people

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It can be difficult for someone to find a high paying job while still in high school. After all, it can be difficult to find a high paying job with just a high school diploma! Some of the challenges in finding a high paying job while still in school include the following:
1. People are reluctant to hire young people
2. It can be difficult to schedule time to work while spending time in school
3. A student His skills are still being developed

However, there are some options to earn money, gain experience, and contribute to the learning process. After all, high school is a time when young people not only learn in school, but also increase their interactions with society at large.

My advice is to follow your passions. This is actually good advice for anyone looking for a job, but it's particularly true for high school students. What I mean by this? If you love music, look for a job that involves music. On the other hand, if you love computers, go down that path. It is very unlikely that you will be able to make a lot of money in a company in which you have no interest.

Here are some possible work areas where age is not necessarily an obstacle, where there is no requirement to work fixed hours that would conflict with school, and where results are far more important than credentials:

1. Play Music - Believe it or not, you can make a pretty good hourly income by playing on the street. Pick a place where your town or city officials won't object, a time when there are lots of people walking, and a place where your music sounds good. Set up, place a basket or your music case for tips, and play with enthusiasm! Bonus: Have business cards and respond favorably to people who ask if you are available to play at parties, weddings, and other events.

2. Computers: programming, creating applications, tutoring others on how to use their nifty new devices. . . You say it! How to start? Offer free tutoring at your public library or senior center, and post your skills online on the many websites where people find freelancers.

3. Food: are you good at preparing food? Find out the rules in your community for selling prepared food at a local farmers market. Baked goods, sandwiches, salads, empanadas, samosas, or other street foods are all popular items. Spread the word that you can cook dinners for people who don't have time to cook. Deliver dinner once a week to individual clients.

4. Tutoring: are you good at math, chemistry, biology, writing? There are many students who could use your help and whose parents might be willing to pay you to help their children get those passing grades! Be professional, make good arrangements regarding time, your fees, and how the tutoring time will be spent. Then stick to them! Your reputation will spread and you will be able to charge a lot of money per hour.

This is just a small overview of what is possible. Sell ​​your art at a flea market or art festival, make jewelry and sell it through a consignment store, volunteer at a business after school for a semester, and find out if they offer you a part-time job in the summer. . . the list goes on.

I hope you see that young people have many skills. What it takes to make money is to be imaginative, confident and persistent. Do not be afraid to communicate to others what you can do, find out what needs people have and why they are willing to pay, and above all. . . Keep following your passion!

Let me tell you something, if you do something for the money, you will quit.

That is all.

In my opinion, you can earn a lot of money from almost any job, but what matters is not how much you earn, but how happy you are.

No matter what people tell you to do, if you don't love it, you won't invest 110% (which is almost a requirement).

I don't know what your values ​​are in life, but you need to figure out what you would love to do every day of your life and THEN find a way to earn money.

So the first step would be to find what you really love and want to do for the rest of your life. (And if you do not like it

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Let me tell you something, if you do something for the money, you will quit.

That is all.

In my opinion, you can earn a lot of money from almost any job, but what matters is not how much you earn, but how happy you are.

No matter what people tell you to do, if you don't love it, you won't invest 110% (which is almost a requirement).

I don't know what your values ​​are in life, but you need to figure out what you would love to do every day of your life and THEN find a way to earn money.

So the first step would be to find what you really love and want to do for the rest of your life. (And if you don't like it anymore, it's okay to switch and do something else.)

Step 2 would be to become irreplaceable. What I mean by that is that most employees tend to be good at only one field. Which makes them very easy to replace (and even more so if it's a competitive field!)

So the idea is to create a skills puzzle where you become the masterpiece of the company and can only climb at the top (if this is what you want).

When I was 16 and discovered that it was possible to make a lot of money online, I was in awe and really wanted to do it.

So I started working as a freelance translator at 17 at Fiverr. I was making some money, but the work was not good. In fact, it was very boring. I wasn't doing it because I loved it, but just for the money (which wasn't so much ahah).

I tried it over and over again for over a year, trying new ideas week after week, not finding anything that could bring me money. While reading about 5 hours a day, every day.

And even the last 2 years were full of failures, it allowed me to learn more than anyone.

Which finally gave me a job 2 months ago.

I started in June 2018 as an intern for 2 weeks, and now I am the COO of the company that gives me more money than 99.9% of people my age.

My work is fantastic and I really love it, it's remote, allowing me to travel the world while making money, and it's really cool.

There is no magic trick.

Do what you love, learn every day, become irreplaceable and be persistent until you get there.

The best career is the one you choose, not the one people tell you to follow. Become the best and you will win everything you want.

GENERAL INFORMATION: I am 17 years old and I live in Australia without a permanent residence. I need a quick job to help me financially support my family. Assuming that I will obtain my permanent residency this year (although it is unpredictable. Nobody is hopeful) and assuming that I will achieve an ATAR score of at least 90. I know that you should not seek a profession for your salary. , but in my case being a pharmacologist is out of my sight. I always dreamed of working in laboratories and making new discoveries and contributing to medical research, but for a farmer like me it is far from being a reality.

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GENERAL INFORMATION: I am 17 years old and I live in Australia without a permanent residence. I need a quick job to help me financially support my family. Assuming that I will obtain my permanent residency this year (although it is unpredictable. Nobody is hopeful) and assuming that I will achieve an ATAR score of at least 90. I know that you should not seek a profession for your salary. , but in my case being a pharmacologist is out of my sight. I always dreamed of working in laboratories and making new discoveries and contributing to medical research, but for a peasant like me it is far from the reach of my immigrant hands. Who am I to choose? But if there is something that I cannot give up, it is my dream in everything related to health. If I can't have pharmacology, I'm fine with a copycat version as long as it helps me financially to help my dying family and makes my dry heart feel a little better. Please help me and don't waste my time, I already have to pay my pending fees for wasting time. The best thing I can do for now is look for a health related job that pays well for 6 members and is achieved quickly. By fast, I mean the pace and length of the academic path that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I already have to pay my pending fees for wasting time. The best thing I can do for now is look for a health related job that pays well for 6 members and is achieved quickly. By fast, I mean the pace and length of the academic path that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I already have to pay my pending fees for wasting time. The best thing I can do for now is look for a health related job that pays well for 6 members and is achieved quickly. By fast, I mean the pace and length of the academic path that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks. I am referring to the pace and duration of the academic route that I must follow to get there. Thanks.

Life is not fair; I'm basically lazy and I got my high paying job very easily, and it's not really a job as I get paid to do my hobby. People contact me to solve their computer problems.

I went to University to study Chemical Engineering, I was introduced to computers, I got my degree, and I went straight into software development, and I never looked back. For the past 30 years or more, 90% of my work has been paid by the hour, and many times the national average. Yes, there have been a few lean years, but overall it has been easy.

Money is not everything; for the last 3 years and next year, I will have had world

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Life is not fair; I'm basically lazy and I got my high paying job very easily, and it's not really a job as I get paid to do my hobby. People contact me to solve their computer problems.

I went to University to study Chemical Engineering, I was introduced to computers, I got my degree, and I went straight into software development, and I never looked back. For the past 30 years or more, 90% of my work has been paid by the hour, and many times the national average. Yes, there have been a few lean years, but overall it has been easy.

Money is not everything; For the last 3 years and the next year, I will have had vacations around the world that lasted 4 months, 3 months and 5 months. Besides that, I have several international and local holidays with friends and family, for example visiting my son who lives in Tokyo.

I have Asperger's, who has problems (not so much for me as for those around me), and if they offered me a tablet to make me "normal", I would not take it. I am very happy with where I am. Asperger covers a variety of conditions, and for you, others, and families, I know YMMV.

As a web developer, I'm not so sure if it's going to change that much in 7 years. I mean that many things can change, but it also depends on the interests of the people.

In some countries, children are already getting started in programming or at least programming concepts. But if they are interested in continuing to program or start building websites, I don't know.

I think not much will change. Companies always need people with work experience and people with knowledge.

Teleconsultant, home care physician, nurses and others, patient experience management, healthcare related hardware and software technicians, physician assistants, consultant, radiologist, cardiologist, physical therapist, orthopedics and others, geriatric care, pulmonologist, dermatologist, cosmetologist, dental surgeon, ophthalmologist n some others.

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